University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Mellon Book Talk: “Sea Change: Ottoman Textiles Between the Mediterranean and Indian Oceans"

Talk by Amanda Philips

Friday, October 14, 2022  | 10am ET (New York time) 

Register Here.

African Photography: The Ethics of Looking and Collecting in the Age of Restitution 

A symposium event presented by the Department of Art, University of Virginia, the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, Co-sponsored by the IHGC

Friday, November 11, 2022  | 9am - 4pm ET (New York time) 

Information and Registration

Futurities Lecture Series

The year-long IHGC lecture series features humanists, scientists, writers, artists, and policy experts who explore burning questions about our unfolding futures.

Learn more

Human/ties

Humanities Week 2022
Learn More

Annual Report 2021-22

VIEW

About the Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures

The Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) offers a vision at once local and global, and a mission both academic and socially engaged.

LEARN MORE

 

News & Announcements

Fri Oct 14
Amanda Phillips, Mellon Book Talk, “Sea Change: Ottoman Textiles Between the Mediterranean and Indian Oceans”

Amanda Phillips, Mellon Book Talk, “Sea Change: Ottoman Textiles Between the Mediterranean and Indian Oceans”

Register here. 

Amanda Phillips is Associate Professor of Islamic Art and Material Culture, having joined the Department of Art in 2015 as Assistant Professor after positions at the University of Birmingham and the Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin. My first book, Everyday Luxuries, was published with the National Museums of Germany in 2016; it explored the circulation of art and objects in the Ottoman capital of Istanbul in the years between 1600 and 1800. The book argued, among other things, that the consumption habits of men and women in Istanbul drove the production of textiles, ceramics, metalware, woodwork, and other crafts, as well as the arts of the book. While these categories of objects form the bulk of many museum collections, they are often neglected by both scholars and curators. Everyday Luxuries proposed new ways of seeing, studying, and exhibiting them, also moving Islamic art history beyond its traditional focus on the uppermost elites. 

 

My second monograph, Sea Change, published in 2021 with the University of California Press, explored Ottoman textiles from both a global and interdisciplinary perspective, uniting the eastern Mediterranean with the Indian Ocean on one hand, and social and economic history with art history, technical studies, and global history on the other. It also insists on a more comprehensive history of textiles, arguing that the plain, the non-canonical, the well-worn, and the downright mediocre are necessary parts of an expanded topography, and deserve treatment on their own terms. Artisans made decisions as the worked, and the book also returns agency to the men and women earning their livings in the textile sector. It shows how they coped with economic hardship and technological change, as well as how they resisted regulations imposed by the central authorities.

 

As an active researcher whose scholarship relies on close analysis of objects, I continue to work in museums across the US, Europe, and the Middle East, with occasional visits to South and East Asia. Using collections in Greece, Turkey, the UK, and the US, my third project will focus on the global language of flowers in the golden age of botany, as seen in textiles and other crafts. It will draw a through-line from the high arts and literature of the Ottoman court to vernacular modes of decoration, with a focus on textiles made and used by women.  

 

My research has been supported by the Fulbright Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Max Planck and Marie Curie Foundations, the Gerda Henkel Stiftung, the British Academy, the Barakat Trust for Islamic Art, the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon, the Pasold Foundation for Textile Research, the Clarendon Bursary at the University of Oxford, and the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art in Honolulu, among other sponsors. 

 

At UVa, I am Affiliated Faculty at the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures and the director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Department of Art, and am currently teaching in the College Fellows Program, part of the Engagements curriculum for first year undergraduates. I continue to offer a comprehensive history of the art and architecture of the Islamic world in the spring of each year and occasionally advise Distinguished Major’s Papers. Students interested in graduate study of the material culture of the Islamic world, and the Ottoman Empire especially, are invited to email me to discuss admission to the doctoral program in Art and Architectural History.

[field_location]


10:00 am - 11:30 am | Online
Fri Oct 28
Geoff Mann (Simon Fraser University), “Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of our Planetary Future”

Geoff Mann (Simon Fraser University), “Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of our Planetary Future”

Register here. 

Geoff Mann, Professor, Geography, Simon Fraser University

My teaching and research concern the politics and political economy of capitalism. I am interested in everything about it, theoretically, empirically, and politically, in all its varieties, past, present and future. I teach courses in political economy and economic geography, and sometimes SFU’s human geography foundation class, Our World: Introducing Human Geography (GEOG 100).

 

Currently, my research has developed along two general, and increasingly intertwined, lines. The first is the historical development and future trajectory of macroeconomic governance (monetary, fiscal and regulatory policy) in the affluent global North. I am particularly interested in the ways that the state attempts to address political-economic and ecological crisis: the policies it develops, the ideas and politics that shape those policies, and the historical and political-economic conditions that make these ideas make sense. This is the focus of In the Long Run We Are All Dead: Keynesianism, Political Economy and Revolution (Verso, 2017), an examination of the past, present and future of Keynesianism and its origins in anxiety concerning the fate of “civilization”. From another angle, it is also the subject of Money and Finance after the Crisis: Critical Thinking for Uncertain Times, edited with Brett Christophers and Andrew Leyshon (of the Universities of Uppsala and Nottingham, respectively). The collection considers how we must rethink the role and meaning of money and finance in modern capitalism in light of the most recent run of crises.

 

Beyond SFU, I am a Senior Fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, and sit on the editorial/advisory boards of Theory & EventThe Journal of Cultural EconomyAntipode, & Historical Materialism, and the book series Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation (University of Georgia Press) and Economic Transformations (Agenda). At SFU, outside the Geography department, I am associated with the Centre for Global Political Economy, the School for International Studies, and the Morgan Centre for Labour Studies.

[field_location]


12:00 - 1:30 pm | Online
Fri Nov 04
Ricardo Padrón, Mellon Book Talk, “The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West”

Ricardo Padrón, Mellon Book Talk, “The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West”

Register here:

Ricardo Padrón is a Professor of Spanish who studies the literature and culture of the early modern Hispanic world, particularly questions of empire, space, and cartography. His recently published monograph, The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West (Chicago 2020) examines the place of Pacific and Asia in the Spanish concept of “the Indies.”  His research for this book has taken him to China, Japan, and the Philippines, and has been sponsored by U.Va.’s Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Arts & Sciences at U.Va., and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has also published on early modern poetry and historiography, and on the mapping of imaginary worlds in modern times. Prof. Padrón is an active member of the Renaissance Society of America, and is currently serving as a member of its Board of Directors. He is also serving as Director of Graduate Studies in Spanish. During the Spring of 2022, Prof. Padrón will be on research leave, and will be spending part of that time as a visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.

[field_location]


10:00 - 11:30 am | Online
Fri Nov 11
African Photography: The Ethics of Looking and Collecting in the Age of Restitution

African Photography: The Ethics of Looking and Collecting in the Age of Restitution

Since the 1990s, exhibitions of African photographers such as Seydou Keïta have raised questions about the relationship of ownership to authorship, visibility to privacy. Concerns about the ethics of looking and collecting have grown more urgent with recent debates about the restitution of African cultural heritage. 

 

This online symposium draws together scholars, artists, and curators who explore the ethics of working with photographs and methods to decolonize the medium, and its histories. 

 

What rights do photographers have? In today's age of hypervisibility, can sitters claim their "right to opacity," to use Édouard Glissant's term? What is the future of collecting and curating photographs that originate in family and colonial archives on the continent? Can viewers embody “the active struggle of looking with,” in Tina Campt’s words - rather than observe passively - and can this engender new ways of seeing?  

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Keynote Temi Odumosu (University of Washington) 
Welcome David Freedberg (Columbia University) and Douglas Fordham (University of Virginia) 
Concluding Remarks Steven Nelson (National Gallery of Art) 

 

 

Presented by

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University
Department of Art, University of Virginia

 

With the generous support of

Buckner W. Clay Endowment for the Humanities, University of Virginia
Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, University of Virginia
UVA Arts & the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts
The Carter G. Woodson Institute, University of Virginia
The Institute of African Studies, Columbia University
The Department of African American & African Diaspora Studies, Columbia University
Photography Network   

 

And with a grant from

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

[field_location]


9:00 AM - 4:00 PM | Webinar
Thu Nov 17
Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

[field_location]


4:30 - 6:00 pm | TBD

News & Announcements

Fri Oct 14
Amanda Phillips, Mellon Book Talk, “Sea Change: Ottoman Textiles Between the Mediterranean and Indian Oceans”

Amanda Phillips, Mellon Book Talk, “Sea Change: Ottoman Textiles Between the Mediterranean and Indian Oceans”

Register here. 

Amanda Phillips is Associate Professor of Islamic Art and Material Culture, having joined the Department of Art in 2015 as Assistant Professor after positions at the University of Birmingham and the Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin. My first book, Everyday Luxuries, was published with the National Museums of Germany in 2016; it explored the circulation of art and objects in the Ottoman capital of Istanbul in the years between 1600 and 1800. The book argued, among other things, that the consumption habits of men and women in Istanbul drove the production of textiles, ceramics, metalware, woodwork, and other crafts, as well as the arts of the book. While these categories of objects form the bulk of many museum collections, they are often neglected by both scholars and curators. Everyday Luxuries proposed new ways of seeing, studying, and exhibiting them, also moving Islamic art history beyond its traditional focus on the uppermost elites. 

 

My second monograph, Sea Change, published in 2021 with the University of California Press, explored Ottoman textiles from both a global and interdisciplinary perspective, uniting the eastern Mediterranean with the Indian Ocean on one hand, and social and economic history with art history, technical studies, and global history on the other. It also insists on a more comprehensive history of textiles, arguing that the plain, the non-canonical, the well-worn, and the downright mediocre are necessary parts of an expanded topography, and deserve treatment on their own terms. Artisans made decisions as the worked, and the book also returns agency to the men and women earning their livings in the textile sector. It shows how they coped with economic hardship and technological change, as well as how they resisted regulations imposed by the central authorities.

 

As an active researcher whose scholarship relies on close analysis of objects, I continue to work in museums across the US, Europe, and the Middle East, with occasional visits to South and East Asia. Using collections in Greece, Turkey, the UK, and the US, my third project will focus on the global language of flowers in the golden age of botany, as seen in textiles and other crafts. It will draw a through-line from the high arts and literature of the Ottoman court to vernacular modes of decoration, with a focus on textiles made and used by women.  

 

My research has been supported by the Fulbright Commission, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Max Planck and Marie Curie Foundations, the Gerda Henkel Stiftung, the British Academy, the Barakat Trust for Islamic Art, the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon, the Pasold Foundation for Textile Research, the Clarendon Bursary at the University of Oxford, and the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art in Honolulu, among other sponsors. 

 

At UVa, I am Affiliated Faculty at the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures and the director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Department of Art, and am currently teaching in the College Fellows Program, part of the Engagements curriculum for first year undergraduates. I continue to offer a comprehensive history of the art and architecture of the Islamic world in the spring of each year and occasionally advise Distinguished Major’s Papers. Students interested in graduate study of the material culture of the Islamic world, and the Ottoman Empire especially, are invited to email me to discuss admission to the doctoral program in Art and Architectural History.

[field_location]


10:00 am - 11:30 am | Online
Fri Oct 28
Geoff Mann (Simon Fraser University), “Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of our Planetary Future”

Geoff Mann (Simon Fraser University), “Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of our Planetary Future”

Register here. 

Geoff Mann, Professor, Geography, Simon Fraser University

My teaching and research concern the politics and political economy of capitalism. I am interested in everything about it, theoretically, empirically, and politically, in all its varieties, past, present and future. I teach courses in political economy and economic geography, and sometimes SFU’s human geography foundation class, Our World: Introducing Human Geography (GEOG 100).

 

Currently, my research has developed along two general, and increasingly intertwined, lines. The first is the historical development and future trajectory of macroeconomic governance (monetary, fiscal and regulatory policy) in the affluent global North. I am particularly interested in the ways that the state attempts to address political-economic and ecological crisis: the policies it develops, the ideas and politics that shape those policies, and the historical and political-economic conditions that make these ideas make sense. This is the focus of In the Long Run We Are All Dead: Keynesianism, Political Economy and Revolution (Verso, 2017), an examination of the past, present and future of Keynesianism and its origins in anxiety concerning the fate of “civilization”. From another angle, it is also the subject of Money and Finance after the Crisis: Critical Thinking for Uncertain Times, edited with Brett Christophers and Andrew Leyshon (of the Universities of Uppsala and Nottingham, respectively). The collection considers how we must rethink the role and meaning of money and finance in modern capitalism in light of the most recent run of crises.

 

Beyond SFU, I am a Senior Fellow at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, and sit on the editorial/advisory boards of Theory & EventThe Journal of Cultural EconomyAntipode, & Historical Materialism, and the book series Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation (University of Georgia Press) and Economic Transformations (Agenda). At SFU, outside the Geography department, I am associated with the Centre for Global Political Economy, the School for International Studies, and the Morgan Centre for Labour Studies.

[field_location]


12:00 - 1:30 pm | Online
Fri Nov 04
Ricardo Padrón, Mellon Book Talk, “The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West”

Ricardo Padrón, Mellon Book Talk, “The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West”

Register here:

Ricardo Padrón is a Professor of Spanish who studies the literature and culture of the early modern Hispanic world, particularly questions of empire, space, and cartography. His recently published monograph, The Indies of the Setting Sun: How Early Modern Spain Mapped the Far East as the Transpacific West (Chicago 2020) examines the place of Pacific and Asia in the Spanish concept of “the Indies.”  His research for this book has taken him to China, Japan, and the Philippines, and has been sponsored by U.Va.’s Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Arts & Sciences at U.Va., and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has also published on early modern poetry and historiography, and on the mapping of imaginary worlds in modern times. Prof. Padrón is an active member of the Renaissance Society of America, and is currently serving as a member of its Board of Directors. He is also serving as Director of Graduate Studies in Spanish. During the Spring of 2022, Prof. Padrón will be on research leave, and will be spending part of that time as a visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.

[field_location]


10:00 - 11:30 am | Online
Fri Nov 11
African Photography: The Ethics of Looking and Collecting in the Age of Restitution

African Photography: The Ethics of Looking and Collecting in the Age of Restitution

Since the 1990s, exhibitions of African photographers such as Seydou Keïta have raised questions about the relationship of ownership to authorship, visibility to privacy. Concerns about the ethics of looking and collecting have grown more urgent with recent debates about the restitution of African cultural heritage. 

 

This online symposium draws together scholars, artists, and curators who explore the ethics of working with photographs and methods to decolonize the medium, and its histories. 

 

What rights do photographers have? In today's age of hypervisibility, can sitters claim their "right to opacity," to use Édouard Glissant's term? What is the future of collecting and curating photographs that originate in family and colonial archives on the continent? Can viewers embody “the active struggle of looking with,” in Tina Campt’s words - rather than observe passively - and can this engender new ways of seeing?  

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Keynote Temi Odumosu (University of Washington) 
Welcome David Freedberg (Columbia University) and Douglas Fordham (University of Virginia) 
Concluding Remarks Steven Nelson (National Gallery of Art) 

 

 

Presented by

The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America, Columbia University
Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University
Department of Art, University of Virginia

 

With the generous support of

Buckner W. Clay Endowment for the Humanities, University of Virginia
Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, University of Virginia
UVA Arts & the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts
The Carter G. Woodson Institute, University of Virginia
The Institute of African Studies, Columbia University
The Department of African American & African Diaspora Studies, Columbia University
Photography Network   

 

And with a grant from

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

[field_location]


9:00 AM - 4:00 PM | Webinar
Thu Nov 17
Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame), "Frameworks for the Future: the environment, climate change and the Anthropocene"

[field_location]


4:30 - 6:00 pm | TBD

The Institute of the Humaities and Global Cultures is pleased to have offered dissertation prospectus development fellowships for three graduate stduents working across departments in the College of Arts & Sciences: Brittany AcorsIsabelle Ostertag, and Rebekah K. Latour.

Brittany Acors (PhD student, Religious...

For the 2022-23 academic year, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures is pleased to welcome Elizabeth Shanks Alexander (Religious Studies) and Oludamini Ogunnaike (Religious Studies) as faculty fellows! Learn More

The IHGC is excited to support three working groups from 2022 to Fall 2023: the Environmental Humanities (EH) working group, Global Histories and Transgender Studies in the Humanities, and a multi-disciplinary and multi-school group to understand listening on individual, interpersonal, and systemic levels. Learn More

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

Learn More

Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

Learn More