University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Post-Humanism in the Anthropocene

IHGC Mellon Symposium 
December 2, 2016

Amitav Ghosh

Distinguished Writer in Residence
April 24-30, 2017

1% Privilege in a Time of Global Inequality

Photography Exhibit curated by Time Magazine photographer Myles Little
March - May 2017

Social Movements

Public Lecture by Prof. Michael Hardt
April 11, 2017

Excavating Contemporary Capitalism

Public Lecture by Prof. Sandro Mezzadra
April 10, 2017

Humanities Week 2017

Living (In)Equality
April 17-23, 2017

Global South: A Colloquium

November 16-19, 2016

News & Announcements

Fri Sep 15
10:00 am - 1:00 pm | Wilson 142
Mellon Fellows Symposium

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Fri Sep 15


Fri Sep 22
9:00 am | Gibson Room Cocke Hall
Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

Fri Sep 22


Sat Sep 23
Music and the Inner World

Music and the Inner World

Sat Sep 23


The conference will address a range of issues related to music and “the inner world,” a phrase open to various interpretations. The program of invited speakers brings together different psychological/psychoanalytic orientations and different scholarly or professional relations to music. There will be nine half-hour presentations, each followed by a half hour of discussion, along with a keynote presentation. Conference sessions will take place all day Saturday, September 23, and on Sunday morning, ending at 12:30 PM.

 

The keynote speaker, Francis Grier, based in London, is a distinguished composer and performer, as well as a practicing psychoanalyst. Other presenters include Diane Austin (NYU; music therapist, author of a book on uses of voice in therapy); Seth Brodsky (University of Chicago; author of a recent book about Lacan and musical modernism); Nomi Dave (University of Virginia; research on music, politics, and pleasure); Marion Guck (University of Michigan; recent research on psychoanalytic concepts as models for the music-listener relationship); Erin Johnson and Cara Marinucci (Integrative Music Institute, Charlottesville private practice therapists and trainers of The Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music); Fred Maus (University of Virginia; recent work on object relations psychoanalysis and music); Jenny Johnson (Wellesley College; composer and author of publications about music and trauma); Mitchell Morris (UCLA; author of a book about 70s popular music and pleasure; influenced by Klein and Winnicott); and Michael Puri (University of Virginia; author of a book on Ravel and other publications that draw on psychoanalysis).

 

Conference events on Saturday and Sunday are free and open to the public. Potential attendees from outside Charlottesville should be aware that hotel accommodations often fill up because of visitors to the University, especially on weekends, and should plan ahead.

Mon Sep 25
9:00 am | Wilson 142
Television Studies in the Global South

Television Studies in the Global South

Mon Sep 25


Thu Oct 05
10:00 am | Wilson 142
Global Political Thought Workshop

Global Political Thought Workshop

Thu Oct 05


Mellon Global South Initiative

Mellon Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences will match the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

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Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

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Project Summary:  This project investigates the impact of the trade of silks from the Indian Ocean into the territories of the Ottoman Empire and specifically into Istanbul during the early modern period. Some South Asian silks brought to Istanbul were both novel and popular among Istanbulites, which in turn spurred local weavers to imitate them. In this way, both Ottoman artisans and...

Project Summary:  I am in the midst of working on a book on the development of clean water and sanitation for the developing world. As of now I am concentrating on two things: first, the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the World Health Organization (WHO) sponsored International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade that ran from 1978 to 1990. The...

Project Summary:  My research examines the importance of what used to be known as 'English Coloured Books' to the conceptualization and visualization of the British Empire. A great many of these images were produced in the medium of aquatint, a tonal intaglio process that encouraged certain types of visual themes, historical narratives, and viewer responses. Three ambitious and...

Project Summary: Training a critical, historical lens on these issues, my current book project, Inventing Informality, traces how the bidonville––a term first coined in the 1920s to describe an area on the periphery of Casablanca distinguished by the rapid construction of unauthorized dwellings by recent rural migrants to the city––came to be understood...

Project Summary:  Located at the juncture of Italian Studies and ecocriticism, my project aims to explore a selection of texts (in an Italian landscape considered at once in its cultural and topological, semiotic and geographical dimensions), in which the boundaries between what is human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic become blurred and indistinct, and ultimately...