University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Puzzle Poetry

Puzzle Poesis

UVa's Puzzle Poetry working group was launched in the fall of 2017 by Neal Curtis and
Brad Pasanek as an experimental and collaborative endeavor. The group seeks to treat
poems as puzzles, isolate the substance of prosody, and apprehend shape as a medium. 
They are makers, coders, and subformalists. 

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Ghosh

Amitav Ghosh

A Conversation on The Great Derangement:
Climate Change and the Unthinkable 
(2016)

WATCH THE LECTURE

Lisa Parks banner

Lisa Parks

IHGC Fall Distinguished Visiting Speaker
“Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror from 9/11 to Trump”
Wilson Hall 142 | 4:30 - 6:00 pm

WATCH THE LECTURE

Achille Mbembe

Achille Mbembe Lecture

"Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism" | September 18, 2017

WATCH THE LECTURE

              

          

Log In!  Humanities Week | April 1 - 5, 2019   Full Schedule Coming Soon

Alexander Galloway

IHGC Spring Distinguished Visiting Speaker
"The Concept of the Digital"
March 18, 2019 | Wilson Hall 142 | 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

CHCI

Humanities Informatics

Consortium of Humanities Centers & Institutes 2018 Annual Meeting | June 13-17, 2018
A conference on Humanities Informatics showcasing the power of the humanities
to address the urgent questions about the ‘human’ in our information age.

WATCH CHCI 2018

Global Map

Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major
humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts &
Sciences
 has matched the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

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Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC)

About

The Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) offers a vision at
once local and global, and a mission both academic and socially engaged. 

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Asian Cosmopolitanisms

Asian Cosmopolitanisms

A new IHGC lab on Asian Cosmopolitanisms aiming to reconceptualize the study of Asia
across the disciplines of the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

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News & Announcements

Mon Mar 25
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm | Nau Hall 101
Amitav Ghosh: Reading and Conversation on upcoming novel Gun Island

Amitav Ghosh: Reading and Conversation on upcoming novel Gun Island

Mon Mar 25


Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of ReasonThe Shadow LinesIn An Antique LandDancing in CambodiaThe Calcutta ChromosomeThe Glass PalaceThe Hungry Tide, and the three volumes of The Ibis Trilogy; Sea of PoppiesRiver of Smoke and Flood of Fire.The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award.

 

Amitav Ghosh’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and he has served on the Jury of the Locarno Film Festival (Switzerland) and the Venice Film Festival (2001). Amitav Ghosh’s essays have been published in The New YorkerThe New Republic and The New York Times. His essays have been published by Penguin India (The Imam and the Indian) and Houghton Mifflin USA (Incendiary Circumstances). He has taught in many universities in India and the USA, including Delhi University, Columbia, Queens College and Harvard.  In January 2007 he was awarded the Padma Shri, one of India’s highest honors, by the President of India. In 2010, Amitav Ghosh was awarded honorary doctorates by Queens College, New York, and the Sorbonne, Paris. Along with Margaret Atwood, he was also a joint winner of a Dan David Award for 2010. In 2011 he was awarded the International Grand Prix of the Blue Metropolis Festival in Montreal. 

 

Thu Mar 28
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm | TBD
Aihwa Ong (UC Berkeley), "The China Flight: Territorializing Rights in Global Platforms

Aihwa Ong (UC Berkeley), "The China Flight: Territorializing Rights in Global Platforms

Thu Mar 28


Bio: As a foreign-born anthropologist, Aihwa Ong has always approached research from vantage points outside or athwart the United States. This angle of inquiry unsettles and troubles stabilized viewpoints and units of analysis in the social sciences.  From her early work on Muslim factory women in Malaysia, to the experiences of migrant Chinese and Cambodian refugees in California; from the selective deployment of neoliberal norms to the rise of biotech projects in Asia, Ong explores how the interaction between global forms and situated politics and cultures shape emerging globalized contexts. 

 

Ong's inter-disciplinary approach and her ideas -- "flexible citizenship," "graduated sovereignty," "global assemblages," among others _ are featured in debates on globalization and modernity. She has lectured internationally and been invited to the World Economic Forum. Her awards include grants from the MacArthur Foundation and the National Science Foundation, and some book prizes.

Thu Apr 04
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM | Wilson Hall 142
Panel on Climate Change & Historical Method | Amitav Ghosh, Julia Adeney Thomas, Ian Baucom

Panel on Climate Change & Historical Method | Amitav Ghosh, Julia Adeney Thomas, Ian Baucom

Thu Apr 04


 

Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of ReasonThe Shadow LinesIn An Antique LandDancing in CambodiaThe Calcutta ChromosomeThe Glass PalaceThe Hungry Tide, and the three volumes of The Ibis Trilogy; Sea of PoppiesRiver of Smoke and Flood of Fire.The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award. Amitav Ghosh’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and he has served on the Jury of the Locarno Film Festival (Switzerland) and the Venice Film Festival (2001). Amitav Ghosh’s essays have been published in The New YorkerThe New Republic and The New York Times. His essays have been published by Penguin India (The Imam and the Indian) and Houghton Mifflin USA (Incendiary Circumstances). He has taught in many universities in India and the USA, including Delhi University, Columbia, Queens College and Harvard.  In January 2007 he was awarded the Padma Shri, one of India’s highest honors, by the President of India. In 2010, Amitav Ghosh was awarded honorary doctorates by Queens College, New York, and the Sorbonne, Paris. Along with Margaret Atwood, he was also a joint winner of a Dan David Award for 2010. In 2011 he was awarded the International Grand Prix of the Blue Metropolis Festival in Montreal. 

 

Bringing critical theory to bear on questions of power in modern societies, Julia Adeney Thomas (University of Notre Dame) investigates concepts of nature in Japanese political ideology, the impact of the climate crisis on historiography, and photography as a political practice.  Her book, Reconfiguring Modernity: Concepts of Nature in Japanese Political Ideology, received the John K. Fairbank Prize from the American Historical Association in 2002 and her essay on wartime memory in Japan, "Photography, National Identity, and the 'Cataract of Times:' Wartime Images and the Case of Japan" in the American Historical Review received the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians' Best Article of the Year Award in 1999.  She brings her research interests into the classroom teaching courses that range from Neolithic Japan to politics and the environment, from comparative fascism to contemporary questions of photography's relationship with suffering.

 

Ian Baucom came to the University of Virginia after serving 17 years in Duke University’s Department of English as a professor and as the director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Since arriving at UVA in the summer of 2014, Dean Baucom has led a series of initiatives within the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. He earned his undergraduate degree in political science from Wake Forest University and holds a master's degree in African studies and a doctorate in English, both from Yale University. Baucom is the author of Out of Place: Englishness, Empire and the Locations of Identity, and Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History. He is the co-editor of Shades of Black: Assembling Black Arts in 1980s Britain.

 

 

 

 

Fri Apr 05
9:30 am | Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Hotel A
Decolonizing the Digital Humanities: Indigenous Arts, Histories, and Knowledges from the Material to the Screen

Decolonizing the Digital Humanities: Indigenous Arts, Histories, and Knowledges from the Material to the Screen

Fri Apr 05


Since the advent of “humanities computing” in the 1940s, known today as “digital humanities” (DH), the field has defined itself as a convergence of technologies and methods that shed light on areas of humanistic inquiry – that is, the study of human experience and expression as mediated through art, history, music, literature, performance, philosophy, and religion, among other frames (Klein and Gold 2012, 2016). Over the years, DH has redefined itself in response to the “ongoing churn of digital innovation” (Reid 2012: 354) and changing scholarly paradigms, from sound studies, new media, and graphic writing systems to intersectional feminism, critical race theory, and Global South studies. As DH practitioners work to diversify and decolonize the field, we confront tensions between DH mantras and the beliefs of communities we work with. These tensions are laid bare in 2019, UNESCO's declared year of Indigenous Languages. Artists and scholars from historically marginalized communities do not approach decolonization in the same ways. African-American writers have used DH tools as an “ethos of recovery” to document their histories of creative work (Gallon 2016), while Indigenous artists and scholars in Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada, and the US have developed policies of data sovereignty that regulate recovery and revelation to outsiders. Policies and practices in Indigenous communities of Latin America diverge from those enacted in the "first-world English-speaking (US and Canada) context)" (Duarte 2017: 5).

 

This conference thus brings together leading scholars and artists from Australia, Latin America, and the US to explore the possibilities and limits of digital decolonization within the context of Indigenous artwork, histories, and knowledges. All events -- panel presentations, keynote address, reception, and roundtable -- are free and open to the public, thanks to funding from the Page-Barbour Foundation, Buckner W. Clay Endowment at the University of Virginia Institute of Humanities & Global Cultures, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Center for the Americas, and McIntire Department of Art.

 

Register for this conference at this link

Wed Apr 10
TBD | Wilson Hall 142
Global Novel Symposium (co-sponsored by New Literary History)

Global Novel Symposium (co-sponsored by New Literary History)

Wed Apr 10


IHGC Symposium on 

The Global Novel: Contemporary Perspectives

Co-sponsored by New Literary History

 

Convener: Debjani Ganguly

 

April 10-11, Venue Wilson 142

 

The looming presence of the novel in world literary studies is unmistakable. More than any other literary genre, the novel is perceived as future-oriented and open-ended, ready to absorb within its polymorphous ambit the indeterminacy of the present, a genre that, in Bakhtin’s words, ‘has a living contact with the unfinished, still evolving contemporary reality.’ It not only travels well, but is also, arguably, the genre par excellence of the mutating lifeworld of global capitalism. Recent world literary approaches to novel studies have ranged from theories of comparative morphology (Moretti); of the mutual shaping of the world novel and human rights discourse (Slaughter); of born-translated works that have an aspiration for cross-lingual circulation embedded in their crafting (Walkowitz); of formal adaptation to the visual stimulation of our new media age, global wars after 1989 and the proliferation of genres of witnessing (Ganguly), and of the novel's planetary scale in works of speculative fiction on climate change (Heise), to name only a few.    

 

This workshop will bring together scholars with expertise in various literary regions – South Africa, South Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, North America, Southern Europe and East Asia – to examine the transformation of the novel across these cultural zones. It will explore recent theories of the novel and compare their relative provenance across multiple novelistic traditions. Offering close readings of works across various vectors – historical, political, cultural, ethical, technological and planetary – the workshop aims to generate new comparative perspectives on the global novel in the twenty-first century. 

 

Speakers:

 

Rebecca Walkowitz (Rutgers)

On Not Knowing: Lahiri, Tawada, Ishiguro

 

Daniel Kim (Brown)

Translations and Ghostings of History: The Novels of Han Kang 

 

Ranjana Khanna (Duke)

“Touch, Water, Death: Affect and The Corpse Washer”

 

Sarah Nuttall (Witwatersrand)

Pluvial Time, Ocean Ontologies and the Heterochronicity of the Present

 

Baidik Bhattacharya (CSDS, Delhi)

Does the Global Novel have a Democratic future? Reading Orham Pamuk and J.M. Coetzee

 

Ignacio Sanchez Prado (Washington University)

Transculturation and the Necropolitical: The Theory of the Novel from Latin America.

 

Debjani Ganguly (University of Virginia)

Catastrophic Form and Planetary Realism: Reading James George and Amitav Ghosh

 

 

Mellon Global South Initiative

Mellon Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences will match the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

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Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

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Jarrett Zigon. "Moral-Political Subjectivity in the Global HIV/AIDS Pandemic"

Project Summary: Throughout the course of the year I would like to ask the following question: what kinds of politico-moral persons are constituted in institutional contexts that combine human rights and personal responsibility approaches to health, and how these kinds of subjectivities relate to local, national, and global forms of the politico-moral represented in health policies?...

Map of Afghanistan during the Safavid and Moghul Empires

Project Summary: My current research project explores the fashioning of a cosmopolitan Persian Indian intellectual culture in early modern South Asia at the hands of the Mughal Empire (r. 1526-1857). Specifically, this project focuses upon the particular phenomenon of "translation," both of texts and of broader religio-cultural worlds. The Mughal court devoted considerable resources...

Windows

Project Summary: This project will examine the reception of thermodynamics within the media theory and practice of the 1920s German avant-garde. In the nineteenth century, the science of thermodynamics placed energy, rather than matter, at the center of a new understanding of the physical universe. As the quintessential science of the industrial revolution, thermodynamics was...

Bird's eye view of Manila

Project Summary:  Following on the heels of my newest book, which explores the form and function of the Pacific Rim in the early modern Spanish geopolitical imagination, The Boxer Codex: Frameworks for Analysis studies cultural contact between Asians and Europeans in early colonial Manila. The Boxer Codex is a lengthy manuscript describing the peoples of East and Southeast...

Matthew Hedstrom, "Religion of Humanity: Spirituality, Politics and the United Nations"

Project Summary:  My year as a Mellon Fellow will support work on a book in progress, called The Religion of Humanity: Spirituality, Politics, and the United NationsThe Religion of Humanity explores the religious history of world government, going back into the nineteenth century and forward to the late twentieth, though centrally concerned with the UN and its...

Fractal Wallpaper

Project Summary:  The Internet once promised the free and open flow of data across borders, but the demands of national sovereignty are increasingly limiting the movement of data between countries. Nowhere is the tension between the free movement and the regulation of data flows more significant than in the Sino-US relationship. Through analyses of corporate case studies, Chinese data...

Jennifer Rubenstein, "The Politics of Emergency Claim-Making and it Alternatives"

Project Summary: The contemporary world is rife with what might be called “emergency claim-making.” Public officials, journalists, scientists, citizen activist groups and others claim that particular situations are emergencies. In so doing, they seek to direct attention and resources to particular groups or issues, justify exceptions to normal rules and procedures, and/or...

35mm Film Grain

Project Summary:  I plan to spend my fellowship year developing my second major research project, whose working title is South by South / West Asia: Transregional Cartographies of Cinematic Action Genres. This project arises out of my broader interests in histories of “world cinema” along South-South axes, namely Middle East - South Asia circulation histories of...