University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Post-Humanism in the Anthropocene

IHGC Mellon Symposium 
December 2, 2016

1% Privilege in a Time of Global Inequality

Photography Exhibit curated by Time Magazine photographer Myles Little
March - May 2017

Extractive Capital

Public Lecture by Prof. Sandro Mezzadra
April 10, 2017

Social Movements

Public Lecture by Prof. Michael Hardt
April 11, 2017

Amitav Ghosh

Distinguished Writer in Residence
April 24-30, 2017

Humanities Week

April 17-23, 2017

Global South: A Colloquium

November 16-19, 2016

News & Announcements

Tue Mar 28
5:30 pm - 7:00 pm | Nau 101
"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

Tue Mar 28


This talk will explore the demands of criticism at the present moment, assessing a number of recent calls for new methods, including those that seek to promote a new mood for criticism. The arguments of my recent book, Bleak Liberalism, will be discussed in relation to these larger debates, and a case will be made for the importance of the tradition of normative critical theory to the challenges we face both inside and outside the academy.  
 

Biography

 

Amanda Anderson joined the Brown faculty in 2012 as the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English and became Director of the Cogut Center for the Humanities in 2015. She is a literary scholar and theorist who has written on nineteenth-century literature and culture as well as on contemporary debates in the humanities. Her books include Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (Princeton, 2006), The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (Princeton, 2001), and Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture (Cornell, 1993).  From 2008-2014, she served as the director of an interdisciplinary summer institute, the School of Criticism and Theory, which is hosted by Cornell University. Prior to joining the Brown faculty, she taught at Johns Hopkins University, where she served as department chair from 2003-2009.

 

In her latest work, Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), Professor Anderson asks: Why is liberalism so often dismissed by thinkers from both the left and the right? To those calling for wholesale transformation or claiming a monopoly on “realistic” conceptions of humanity, liberalism’s assured progressivism can seem hard to swallow. Bleak Liberalism makes the case for a renewed understanding of the liberal tradition, showing that it is much more attuned to the complexity of political life than conventional accounts have acknowledged.

Amanda Anderson examines canonical works of high realism, political novels from England and the United States, and modernist works to argue that liberalism has engaged sober and even stark views of historical development, political dynamics, and human and social psychology. From Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Hard Times to E. M. Forster’s Howards End to Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook, this literature demonstrates that liberalism has inventive ways of balancing sociological critique and moral aspiration. A deft blend of intellectual history and literary analysis, Bleak Liberalism reveals a richer understanding of one of the most important political ideologies of the modern era.

Thu Mar 30
8:00 pm | Old Cabell Hall
Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

Thu Mar 30


Click here for tickets ($12 general / free for students)

 

A series of curricular, co-curricular, creative, and academic events around a movie screening of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc presented with live music by the Orlando Consort. Visit the main page for a full schedule of activities. 
 

Voices Appeared: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc and the Orlando Consort

“Voices Appeared: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc and the Orlando Consort” is a live multimedia performance and historical reconstruction of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc. “Voices Appeared” features live musical accompaniment to the film, curated and performed by the Orlando Consort. Inspired by Joan of Arc’s gnomic description of angels appearing before her, “Voices Appeared” reconciles the silent film medium with Joan’s narrative experience of hearing voices. The project uses vocal works from the early part of the fifteenth century, when Joan was alive and active, providing historical context as well as musical commentary on her psyche while in captivity, especially as a gender and religious minority figure.
 

Cited as “simultaneously ravishing and reverential” by the Los Angeles Times and “enthralling” by The London Evening Standard, the Orlando Consort, formed in 1988 by the Early Music Network of Great Britain, is one of Europe’s most expert and consistently challenging groups performing repertoire from the years 1050 to 1550. Their work successfully combines captivating entertainment and fresh scholarly insight. The unique imagination and originality of their programming, together with their superb vocal skills, has marked the Consort out as the outstanding leaders of their field. More infomation at http://www.orlandoconsort.com/
 

 

Fri Mar 31
10:30 am - 7:30 pm | Nau 101
The Global/Contemporary Symposium

The Global/Contemporary Symposium

Fri Mar 31


What is gained and what is lost, what is revealed and what is obscured by understanding the moment in which we live as global? This one-day symposium at the University of Virginia will explore the alignment of two dominant terms within the academy, the “contemporary” and the “global,” to question, challenge, and expand the relationship between them. We hope to interrogate the ways in which the phenomena that draw the attention of scholars of the contemporary—the rise of digital media, an increasingly inter- and supra-national economy, technologies of migration and communication, far-reaching environmental degradation, and political unrest—have become the prominent reference points for writing about our current moment. While the time in which we live is inarguably global, this schema can obscure alternate ones and allow us to forget that the characteristics marking our era as “global” have long and complex histories of their own. Inviting a vibrant group of scholars, we hope that this symposium might lead to longer-term collaborations and an intellectual community that will supplement the ties we hold to our own departments and institutions—indeed, to create a wider-reaching and even global network of discourse surrounding this subject. For more information, visit the Global/Contemporary Symposium website.

Thu Apr 06
Political Thinking at the Margins

Political Thinking at the Margins

Thu Apr 06


Conference Conveners: Lawrie Balfour, Murad Idris, Sandhya Shukla 

 

Funded by the Clay Foundation, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, the Page-Barbour Foundation, the Center for Global Innovation and Inquiry, and the Department of Politics

 

Speakers: 
Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers), Adom Getachew (University of Chicago), Barnor Hesse (Northwestern), Juliet Hooker (University of Texas-Austin), Desmond Jagmohan (Princeton), Hagar Kotef (SOAS), Aishwary Kumar (Stanford), Joseph Massad (Columbia), Robert Nichols (University of Minnesota), Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton), Aziz Rana (Cornell), Andrew Sartori (NYU), Alicia Schmidt-Camacho (Yale), Chris Taylor (University of Chicago), and Megan Thomas (University of California-Santa Cruz); and Vijay Prashad (Trinity) will deliver a keynote address on the opening night.
 

Sat Apr 08
8:30 am | Wilson 142
Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

Sat Apr 08


For more information, visit the official event page

Mellon Global South Initiative

Mellon Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences will match the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

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Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

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Project Summary:  This project investigates the impact of the trade of silks from the Indian Ocean into the territories of the Ottoman Empire and specifically into Istanbul during the early modern period. Some South Asian silks brought to Istanbul were both novel and popular among Istanbulites, which in turn spurred local weavers to imitate them. In this way, both Ottoman artisans and...

Project Summary:  I am in the midst of working on a book on the development of clean water and sanitation for the developing world. As of now I am concentrating on two things: first, the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the World Health Organization (WHO) sponsored International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade that ran from 1978 to 1990. The...

Project Summary:  My research examines the importance of what used to be known as 'English Coloured Books' to the conceptualization and visualization of the British Empire. A great many of these images were produced in the medium of aquatint, a tonal intaglio process that encouraged certain types of visual themes, historical narratives, and viewer responses. Three ambitious and...

Project Summary: Training a critical, historical lens on these issues, my current book project, Inventing Informality, traces how the bidonville––a term first coined in the 1920s to describe an area on the periphery of Casablanca distinguished by the rapid construction of unauthorized dwellings by recent rural migrants to the city––came to be understood...

Project Summary:  Located at the juncture of Italian Studies and ecocriticism, my project aims to explore a selection of texts (in an Italian landscape considered at once in its cultural and topological, semiotic and geographical dimensions), in which the boundaries between what is human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic become blurred and indistinct, and ultimately...