University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Civil Resistance

Humanities Week | April 2-7, 2018

See Full Schedule Here

Asian Cosmopolitanisms

A new IHGC lab on Asian Cosmopolitanisms aiming to reconceptualize the study of Asia
across the disciplines of the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

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Humanities Informatics

Consortium of Humanities Centers & Institutes 2018 Annual Meeting | June 13-17, 2018
A conference on Humanities Informatics showcasing the power of the humanities
to address the urgent questions about the ‘human’ in our information age.

WATCH CHCI 2018

Puzzle Poesis

UVa's Puzzle Poetry working group was launched in the fall of 2017 by Neal Curtis and
Brad Pasanek as an experimental and collaborative endeavor. The group seeks to treat
poems as puzzles, isolate the substance of prosody, and apprehend shape as a medium. 
They are makers, coders, and subformalists. 

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Amitav Ghosh

A Conversation on The Great Derangement:
Climate Change and the Unthinkable 
(2016)

WATCH THE LECTURE

Achille Mbembe Lecture

"Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism" | September 18, 2017

WATCH THE LECTURE

Lisa Parks

IHGC Fall Distinguished Visiting Speaker
“Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror from 9/11 to Trump”
Wilson Hall 142 | 4:30 - 6:00 pm

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About

The Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) offers a vision at
once local and global, and a mission both academic and socially engaged. 

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Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major
humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts &
Sciences
 has matched the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

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News & Announcements

Fri Oct 26
9:00 am | Alderman Library 421
Puzzles, Bots & Poems: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Poetics, Structure, Design, and Constraint

Puzzles, Bots & Poems: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Poetics, Structure, Design, and Constraint

Fri Oct 26


Puzzles, Bots, and Poetics

A Symposium hosted by the Puzzle Poetry Group and Scholars' Lab

 

Friday, October 26

 

9 AM - Kate Compton, Generative Art Workshop 

http://galaxykate.com/

 

2 PM - Tony Veale, University College Dublin 

"Game of Tropes II: A Clash of Symbols"

 

3 PM - Sarah Tindal Kareem, UCLA

"Chasing Daedalus"

 

4 PM - Louis Bury, CUNY Hostos

"'Rats Build Their Labyrinths': On the Psychology and Aesthetics of Puzzles"

 

 

Saturday, October 27

 

10 AM - Dennis Tenen, Columbia University

"Techniques of Industrial Modernism: Plot Robot"

 

11 AM - Whitney Sperrazza, University of Kansas 

"Blazonic (Un)making: Margaret Cavendish's 

Recipe Poems as Early Modern Maker Labs"

 

1 PM - Herbert Tucker, University of Virginia

Riddle Poems: A Discussion

 

2 PM - Bret Rothstein, Indiana University

"Secret Hardware Handshakes"

 

This event made possible by the support of the 

Page-Barbour Committee and UVa's IHGC

Thu Nov 01
4:00 pm | Wilson Hall 142
Heekyoung Cho, “Rethinking World Literature through the Relations between Russian and East Asian Literatures”

Heekyoung Cho, “Rethinking World Literature through the Relations between Russian and East Asian Literatures”

Thu Nov 01


Bio: Dr. Heekyoung Cho completed her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, writing a dissertation on the translation and adaptation of Russian literature in early twentieth-century Korea. She is the author of Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature (Harvard University Asia Center, 2016). Dr. Cho's other areas of interest include translation and the formation of national literature, modern Korean literature and its historiography, and Korean-Japanese-Russian cultural relations. At the UW, Dr. Cho teaches courses in Korean literature, culture, film, and language.

Fri Nov 02
10:30 am | Wilson Hall 142
Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jarrett Zigon & Aynne Kokas)

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jarrett Zigon & Aynne Kokas)

Fri Nov 02


Mellon Fellows Symposium

November 2

Wilson 142

 

 

 

10.30-11.30am

Jarrett Zigon, William & Linda Porterfield Chair in Biomedical Ethics and Professor of Anthropology

"A War on People: Dying-with and the Relational Ethics and Politics of Community"

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Aynne Kokas, Assistant Professor, Department of Media Studies

"The New Cybersovereigns: Power, Control, and Data Between China and the United States"

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Jarrett Zigon's interests include the anthropology of moralities and ethics; the intertwining of humans, worlds and situations; political activity and theory; the intersection of anthropology and philosophy; the drug war; artificial intelligence and ethics; and data ethics. These interests are taken up from the perspective of an anthropology strongly influenced by post-Heideggerian continental philosophy and critical theory, the theoretical articulation of which he names critical hermeneutics.

 

Aynne Kokas is an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Virginia. Kokas’ work focuses on the intersections between Chinese and US media and technology industries. Her book, Hollywood Made in China (University of California Press 2017), examines the cultural, political and economic implications of US media investment in China as it becomes the world’s largest film market. Hollywood Made in China has been profiled or cited publications in seven languages and forty-two countries. Kokas’ research on China’s media industry has also appeared or is forthcoming in publications including PLOS OneGlobal Media and CommunicationThe Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Communication, and In Media Res

Fri Nov 02
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm | Wilson Hall 142
Leila Neti (Occidental College), “Global Fictions of History: Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone and the Kohinoor Diamond”

Leila Neti (Occidental College), “Global Fictions of History: Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone and the Kohinoor Diamond”

Fri Nov 02


Bio: Professor Leila Neti's teaching and research interests focus on postcolonial and transnational literature, theory, and film, nineteenth century British literature, and cultural studies.  In particular, her courses examine film and literature with reference to the larger cultural, political, and social formations within which these works are produced and consumed. 

Fri Nov 02
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | Gibson Room, Cocke Hall
Joshua August “Gus” Skorburg (Duke University), "What Counts as Research in Data Science?"

Joshua August “Gus” Skorburg (Duke University), "What Counts as Research in Data Science?"

Fri Nov 02


Bio: Joshua August Skorburg completed his PhD in Philosophy at the University of Oregon. His research is in applied ethics (bioethics, neuroethics, data ethics), moral psychology (virtue theory and feminist ethics), and the philosophy of cognitive science. In addition to the MIDS program, he is affiliated with the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke. He is currently working on a number of theoretical and empirical projects about the nature of self and identity.

Mellon Global South Initiative

Mellon Global South Initiative

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Virginia $3.47 million to launch a major humanities initiative dedicated to the study of the Global South. The College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences will match the grant, making the initial five-year investment to launch the initiative about $7 million.

Clay Endowments & Grants

Clay Endowments & Grants

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures (IHGC) invites proposals for funding from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment to support innovative work in the global humanities at the University of Virginia. The Endowment provides an ambitious basis of support for faculty and student research and teaching to be conducted under the auspices of the IHGC. Faculty and students from across all schools and disciplines at the university are welcome and encouraged to apply. 

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Bologna

Summer School in Global Studies and Critical Theory

The Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory is a new research entity jointly promoted by the University of Virginia, Duke University and the University of Bologna. It is conceived as an intellectual space for scholars coming from different research fields and geographical regions to work together on the redefinition of the humanities in a global age.

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Project Summary: Throughout the course of the year I would like to ask the following question: what kinds of politico-moral persons are constituted in institutional contexts that combine human rights and personal responsibility approaches to health, and how these kinds of subjectivities relate to local, national, and global forms of the politico-moral represented in health policies?...

Project Summary: My current research project explores the fashioning of a cosmopolitan Persian Indian intellectual culture in early modern South Asia at the hands of the Mughal Empire (r. 1526-1857). Specifically, this project focuses upon the particular phenomenon of "translation," both of texts and of broader religio-cultural worlds. The Mughal court devoted considerable resources...

Project Summary: This project will examine the reception of thermodynamics within the media theory and practice of the 1920s German avant-garde. In the nineteenth century, the science of thermodynamics placed energy, rather than matter, at the center of a new understanding of the physical universe. As the quintessential science of the industrial revolution, thermodynamics was...

Project Summary:  Following on the heels of my newest book, which explores the form and function of the Pacific Rim in the early modern Spanish geopolitical imagination, The Boxer Codex: Frameworks for Analysis studies cultural contact between Asians and Europeans in early colonial Manila. The Boxer Codex is a lengthy manuscript describing the peoples of East and Southeast...

Project Summary:  My year as a Mellon Fellow will support work on a book in progress, called The Religion of Humanity: Spirituality, Politics, and the United NationsThe Religion of Humanity explores the religious history of world government, going back into the nineteenth century and forward to the late twentieth, though centrally concerned with the UN and its...

Project Summary:  The Internet once promised the free and open flow of data across borders, but the demands of national sovereignty are increasingly limiting the movement of data between countries. Nowhere is the tension between the free movement and the regulation of data flows more significant than in the Sino-US relationship. Through analyses of corporate case studies, Chinese data...

Project Summary: The contemporary world is rife with what might be called “emergency claim-making.” Public officials, journalists, scientists, citizen activist groups and others claim that particular situations are emergencies. In so doing, they seek to direct attention and resources to particular groups or issues, justify exceptions to normal rules and procedures, and/or...

Project Summary:  I plan to spend my fellowship year developing my second major research project, whose working title is South by South / West Asia: Transregional Cartographies of Cinematic Action Genres. This project arises out of my broader interests in histories of “world cinema” along South-South axes, namely Middle East - South Asia circulation histories of...