University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

News

"Poetry and the World" Symposium

April 6, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

"Poetry and the World" Symposium

April 6, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

"POETRY AND THE WORLD" SYMPOSIUM

Friday, April 6, 2018

10am-5pm, Nau Hall Auditorium (Nau 101)

Nau Hall Auditorium (Nau 101)

Free Admission

10am-5pm

 

SCHEDULE:

10am - Noon - Panel 1
     Janet Neigh
         “Oral Memory in Digital Territories” 
     Yasser Elhariry
         “Strait, Sea, Poem: Emmanuel Hocquard" 
     Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak
         “Persian Poetry in the Persianate World and Beyond” 
    
Noon - 1:30pm - Lunch Break

1:30pm - 3:30pm - Panel 2
     Eric Hayot
          "Blazon: Between the Who and the What"
     Juliana Spahr
          "Poetry’s Stubborn Nationalism in the World"
     Susan Stewart
          "Poetry and the (Natural) World"
    
4:00pm - 5:00pm - Daljit Nagra

Deborah Baker, "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative"

April 3, 2018

Solarium of the Colonnade Club | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Deborah Baker, "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative"

April 3, 2018

Solarium of the Colonnade Club | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a reading with Deborah Baker, who is one of the special highlights of the IHGC’s annual 2018 Humanities Week (April 2-6).

 

On Tuesday, April 3 at 5:00 p.m in the Solarium of the Colonnade Club, Baker will deliver a lecture entitled "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative." She will also be reading from her current book, The Last Englishmen.

 

About Deborah Baker

 

Deborah Baker’s first full-length book, a biography of the American modernist poet Laura Riding, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1994. After many years as a book editor in various New York publishing houses, she wrote A Blue Hand, an account of Allen Ginsberg’s travels in India that also traced the idea of India in the American imagination.  While a Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, she researched and wrote The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award in Non-fiction. Her current book, The Last Englishmen, for which she received support from the Guggenheim and Whiting Foundations. will be published by Graywolf Press this summer.

Humanities Week 2018

April 2, 2018

Humanities Week 2018

April 2, 2018

Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) at the University of Virginia

Humanities Week 2018: Civil Resistance, April 2 – 7

The theme of the IHGC’s annual, student-produced Humanities Week 2018—“Civil Resistance”—was inspired by a desire to respond to the neo-fascist, ‘Unite the Right’ rally last summer here in Charlottesville. The violence of August 11-12, 2017, awakened our community’s awareness of racism and extremist beliefs and violence, and spurred a variety of positive, constructive responses on approaching prejudice, injustice, and inequality. This student-produced Humanities Week 2018 includes presentations, workshops, games, poetry, art exhibits, and other activities planned by a diverse group of students, faculty, and community members who are challenging the status quo to bring awareness and change through peaceful resistance. We’ll explore the many ways that these movers and shakers are using art, literature, music, dance, and other tools of the humanities to express their sentiments and declare their rights.

Monday, April 2

  • 5:00-6:30pm @ Brooks Hall Commons, “Revealing Unsung Heroes to Inspire Change,” a panel discussion with filmmaker Chris Farina and 3rd-year students Isabella Ciambotti and Emma Hendrix.
  • 7:00 – 8:30pm @ Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge (room 229A), “Because Everything is Terrible,” a poetry reading by Paul Guest, sponsored by the Disability Studies Initiative.

 

Tuesday, April 3

  • 11am – 1pm @ the UVA Amphitheater, “Constructing Dissent,” UVA’s Puzzle Poetry Group diplays their largest puzzle yet.
  • 5:00pm-6:30pm @ the Colonnade Club Solarium, “Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative,” a reading by Deborah Baker.

 

Wednesday, April 4

  • 7:00pm-8:30pm in Diane D’Costa’s Lawn Room, “Artistic Expression workshop,” with UVA 4th-year and lawn resident Diane D’Costa.

 

Thursday, April 5

  • 11:30am-12:30pm in Wilson 142, “Civility, Civil Rights, and Civil Resistance: Exploring the Charlottesville Syllabus and Direct Action from Grounds,” with Sophie Abramowitz, Maya Hislop, Eva Latterner, and Marc Mazique in association with the Graduate Student Coalition for Liberation (GSCL).

 

Friday, April 6

  • 4:30 – 7pm, Campbell 160 and the Fralin Art Museum, “Art of Protest,” presentations & a panel discussion with Emily Monaghan, Samuel Johnson, Charlotte Hennessy, Susannah Townes, University Museum Interns, & others.

Global Knowledges, Local Universities

March 22, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 8:45 am

Global Knowledges, Local Universities

March 22, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 8:45 am

 

The Global Studies Program has organized a conference to engage local, national, and international scholars in the field of Global Studies to examine the debates over the meaning of 'the global,' to outline prospects and challenges for Global Scholarship, and to imagine the contribution of Global Studies to an emerging 21st century university.

 

With six panels in two days, the conference will feature 22 scholars as they discuss topics such as: Meanings of Globalism in Contemporary Academia, Global Studies in Liberal Arts, Global Political Economy, Global Studies and Area Studies, Global South, and Local Meets the Global: Engaging with the Community. 

 

Click here for more information. 

Bologna Academy Graduate Conference, "Race and Division of Labor in Global Western Empires, 1791-1888"

March 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:30 am - 5:30 pm

Bologna Academy Graduate Conference, "Race and Division of Labor in Global Western Empires, 1791-1888"

March 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:30 am - 5:30 pm

Geoff Eley, "Fascism and Antifascism, 1920-2020"

February 19, 2018

Newcomb Hall Gallery | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Geoff Eley, "Fascism and Antifascism, 1920-2020"

February 19, 2018

Newcomb Hall Gallery | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

 

Geoff Eley is the Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He works on modern German and European History, nationalism, fascism, film and history, and historiography. His earliest works were Reshaping the German Right: Radical Nationalism and Political Change after Bismarck (1980, 1991) and The Peculiarities of German History (with David Blackbourn, 1980, 1984). More recent books include Forging Democracy: The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000 (2002), A Crooked Line: From Cultural History to the History of Society (2005), The Future of Class in History (with Keith Nield, 2007), and Nazism as Fascism: Violence, Ideology, and the Ground of Consent in Germany, 1930-1945 (2013). Eley's edited or co-edited books include The Goldhagen Effect: History, Memory, Nazism (2000), Citizenship and National Identity in Twentieth-Century Germany (with Jan Palmowski, 2007), German Colonialism in a Global Age (2014), and German Modernities from Wilhelm to Weimar: A Contest of Futures (2016). He is currently writing a general history of Europe in the twentieth century.

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Nizar Hermes, Christina Mobley, Murad Idris)

February 16, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Nizar Hermes, Christina Mobley, Murad Idris)

February 16, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday February 16, 2018

9:30am - 1:30pm

 

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Nizar Hermes, Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures

"Ibn Sharaf (d. 1067)’s Elegy for the City of Qayrawan"

 

10:30 am - 11:30 am

Christina Mobley, Assistant Professor of History

"Vodou History: the Kongo History of the Haitian Revolution"

 

11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Murad Idris, Assistant Professor of Politics

"Reading Ibn Tufayl in the Modern Middle East: Philosophy, Colonialism, and Political Fantasies"

 

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch

Oceans of Exchange: Art, Indigeneity, and the 21st Century Museum

February 2, 2018

Harrison Small Auditorium | 10:00 am - 2:30 pm

Oceans of Exchange: Art, Indigeneity, and the 21st Century Museum

February 2, 2018

Harrison Small Auditorium | 10:00 am - 2:30 pm

Joshua Reeves, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance & Media Escalation

February 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 6:00 pm

Joshua Reeves, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance & Media Escalation

February 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 6:00 pm

Please join us for the first Surveillance and Infrastructure research group, part of the Humanities and Informatics lab, lecture by Joshua Reeves. His talk, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance and Media Escalation" will take place in Wilson 142 at 6:00 next Thursday, Feb. 1st. This is followed by a workshop where we'll discuss chapters from his book, Citizen Spy, on Friday at noon over lunch in Wilson 142. 

Isabel Hofmeyr, Workshop on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

November 17, 2017

Wilson 142 | 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Isabel Hofmeyr, Workshop on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

November 17, 2017

Wilson 142 | 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
presents a workshop with
Professor Isabel Hofmeyr (NYU and Witswatersrand)
on
Indian Ocean Worlds

 

Program

 

12.00-1.00pm: Lunch

 

1.00-1.15pm: Introduction

 

1.15-1.45pm: Isabel Hofmeyr on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

 

1.45-2.00pm: Fahad Bishara (respondent)

 

2.00-2.15pm: Maya Boutaghou (respondent)

 

2.15-3.30pm: Discussion  and Q & A 

 

Bio: Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor of African Literature and Indian Ocean Cultures at the University of the Witswatersand. Her research interests include postcolonialism; African literature; Southern African literary studies; oral history and literature; John Bunyan; seventeenth century studies; textual transnationalism; Africa-India interactions; Indian Ocean studies; histories of the book and print culture; and histories of reading and writing. Her current work focuses on Africa and its intellectual trajectories in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Her earlier scholarship examined ways of historicising oral literature and its interactions with literacy. As South Africa’s transition opened the country up to democracy and globalisation, Hofmeyr turned her attention to themes of transnationalism and textual circulation. More recently she has explored textual circulation in the Global South with a focus on the Indian Ocean. Her work addresses questions of Africa’s intellectual place in the world and the material and aesthetic history of texts and their transnational circulation. She is the author of Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (Harvard, 2013), The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History of The Pilgrim's Progress (Princeton, 2004), We Spend Our Years As a Tale that is Told: Oral Historical Narrative in a South African Chiefdom (Heinemann, 1994).

Religious and Cultural Appropriation, Then and Now: Round Table Workshop

November 10, 2017

Rouss Hall 223 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Religious and Cultural Appropriation, Then and Now: Round Table Workshop

November 10, 2017

Rouss Hall 223 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspective | Workshop with Sarah Nuttall

November 7, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspective | Workshop with Sarah Nuttall

November 7, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

The Institute for the Humanities and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a workshop with Sarah Nuttall, Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Director of the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. 

 

On Monday, November 6 at 5:00 p.m, Professor Nuttall will deliver her lecture entitled "The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art" in the Bryan Hall faculty lounge. There is no registration required for this event.

 

And on Tuesday, November 7, from 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m, Professor Nuttall will offer a workshop, "Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspectives." The workshop will be held in Wilson Hall 142. Faculty and students who wish to participate in the workshop should register here. Three workshop readings are available through the registration form. Coffee and refreshments will be available at the beginning of the event.

 

About Sarah Nuttall

 

Sarah Nuttall is Director of the Wits Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg. A literary scholar by training, Sarah’s varied research interests and prolific publication record have established her as a leading cultural commentator and critic in South Africa as well as one of the leading scholars of her generation. She has lectured at the University of Stellenbosch and has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard, Yale and Duke. Sarah has edited several path-breaking books. Her influential monograph, Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Post-apartheid, explores mutuality, transgression and embodiment in contemporary South Africa.Sarah has published in various journals including in Cultural Studies, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Journal of South African Studies, Public Culture, Third Text and Social Dynamics. She is a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Southern African Studies, Humanity, Cultural Studies, Social Dynamics, English Studies in Africa, and English Academy Review. She serves on the advisory board of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory. 

Sarah Nuttall, “The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art”

November 6, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Sarah Nuttall, “The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art”

November 6, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Bio: Sarah Nuttall is Director of the Wits Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg. A literary scholar by training, Sarah’s varied research interests and prolific publication record have established her as a leading cultural commentator and critic in South Africa as well as one of the leading scholars of her generation. She has lectured at the University of Stellenbosch and has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard, Yale and Duke. Sarah has edited several path-breaking books. Her influential monograph, Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Post-apartheid, explores mutuality, transgression and embodiment in contemporary South Africa.Sarah has published in various journals including in Cultural Studies, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Journal of South African Studies, Public Culture, Third Text and Social Dynamics. She is a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Southern African Studies, Humanity, Cultural Studies, Social Dynamics, English Studies in Africa, and English Academy Review. She serves on the advisory board of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory. 

Poulomi Saha, "Dropped Stitches: Fabrics of Life & the Gendered Production of Postcolonial Bangladesh"

November 3, 2017

Wilson 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Poulomi Saha, "Dropped Stitches: Fabrics of Life & the Gendered Production of Postcolonial Bangladesh"

November 3, 2017

Wilson 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Poulomi Saha is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley, where she teaches courses in postcolonial studies, gender and sexuality theory, and ethnic American literature.

 

Her research and teaching agenda spans eastward and forward from the late 19th century decline of British colonial rule in the Indian Ocean through to the Pacific and the rise of American global power and domestic race relations in the 20th century. Professor Saha is interested in developing an expansive view of empire and of what constitutes Anglophone literature, routed not primarily through Great Britain and Western Europe but rather through circuits of affiliation and encounter between Asia and the Americas.

 

She is currently completing her first monograph, An Empire of Touch: Feminine Political Labor & The Fabrication of East Bengal, 1905-2015, which turns attention to East Bengal, the historical antecedent of Bangladesh, today an international exemplar of development driven by gender-targeted foreign aid. An Empire of Touch recounts a new narrative of female political labor under empire, spanning from anticolonial nationalism to neoliberal globalization, through text and textile. It follows the historical traces of how women have claimed their labor, making what has been customarily seen as “merely” intimate and domestic into appreciable political acts.

 

Her work has been published in differences and The Journal of Modern Literature.

Cities of the Global South Symposium

November 1, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Cities of the Global South Symposium

November 1, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Michael Dobson, "Accents Yet Unknown: Nationalisms, National Theaters & The Return of Julius Caesar"

October 30, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm

Michael Dobson, "Accents Yet Unknown: Nationalisms, National Theaters & The Return of Julius Caesar"

October 30, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm

Nicholas Kristof, "Sanctuary and Belonging: Overcoming a Divided America"

October 23, 2017

Nau Hall 101 | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Nicholas Kristof, "Sanctuary and Belonging: Overcoming a Divided America"

October 23, 2017

Nau Hall 101 | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

 

Remapping the Urban Workshop (with Sheila Crane)

October 20, 2017

Wilson 142 | 1:00 pm

Remapping the Urban Workshop (with Sheila Crane)

October 20, 2017

Wilson 142 | 1:00 pm

Remapping the Urban:

Everyday Practices of Adaptation & the Politics of Presence

20 October 2017

 

Wilson Hall 142

 

1:00–1:15             Welcome & introduction, Sheila Crane, Associate Professor & Chair, Architectural History,

                                                University of Virginia

 

1:15–2:15                Anne-Maria Makhulu, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Anthropology & African

                                                and African-American Studies, Duke University

                                “Lessons from the Apartheid and Post-Apartheid City”

 

2:15–3:15                William Bissell, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Lafayette College

                                TBA (film & media in Zanzibar)

 

3:15–3:30             Coffee break

 

3:30–4:30               Katarzyna Pieprzak, Chair & Professor of Francophone Literature, French Language, and

                                                Comparative Literature, French & Africana Studies, Williams College

                                “In Praise of Surface Readings: The Art and Politics of Urban Whitewashing in the

                                Casablanca-based work of Hassan Darsi and Yto Barrada”

 

4:30–5:00             Concluding discussion

Ongoing Mahfil: The Urdu Ghazal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Ongoing Mahfil: The Urdu Ghazal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

A Night of Sufi Music and Ghazals

October 15, 2017

Old Cabell Hall Auditorium | 7:00 pm

A Night of Sufi Music and Ghazals

October 15, 2017

Old Cabell Hall Auditorium | 7:00 pm

Global Intellectual & Political Thought

October 5, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:15 am

Global Intellectual & Political Thought

October 5, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:15 am

Global Political Thought

Perspectives from South Asia and the Middle East

 

October 5, 2017

Wilson 142

 

9.15am: Welcome and Introduction

Debjani Ganguly
 

9.30am-10.30am

Dilip Menon, University of the Witswatersrand

“Colonial Cosmopolitanisms, Literary Modernism and Deep History: The Essays of Kesari Balakrishna Pillai”

 

10.30am-11.00am: Coffee
 

11.00am-12.00pm

Aditya Nigam, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi

“Ambedkar, Micropower and Marxism”

 

12.00-1.00pm

Aishwary Kumar, Stanford University

“A War without End: Ambedkar and the Dispositif of Cruelty.”

 

1.00pm-2.00pm: Lunch
 

2.00pm-3.00pm

Murad Idris, University of Virginia

“Luthers of the Orient: Colonists, Reformers, and Tactical Identifications”

 

3.00pm-4.00pm

Marwa Elshakry, Columbia University

“In Search of a Golden Age: Universal Histories of Science, Islam and the Arabs.”

 

4.00pm-4.30pm: coffee
 

4.30pm-5.30pm

Prathama Banerjee, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi

“Equality: Ontology of an Idea”

 

5.30pm-6.00pm: Concluding Remarks

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jessica Andruss, Michael Allen, Andrej Petrovic)

September 22, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jessica Andruss, Michael Allen, Andrej Petrovic)

September 22, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:00 pm

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday September 22, 2017

9:30am - 1:30pm

 

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Michael Allen, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

"On Weakness of Will: A Nyāya Approach to the Environmental Humanities"

 

10:30 am - 11:30 am

Jessica Andruss, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

"An Arabic Poetics of the Hebrew Bible: Thinking About Metaphor in Medieval Jerusalem"

 

11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Andrej Petrovic, Professor of Classics

"Concept of Belief in Greek Religion"

 

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch

Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

September 22, 2017

Gibson Room Cocke Hall | 9:30 am

Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

September 22, 2017

Gibson Room Cocke Hall | 9:30 am

Achille Mbembe, "Critique of Black Reason" Workshop

September 18, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

Achille Mbembe, "Critique of Black Reason" Workshop

September 18, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

The Institute for the Humanites and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a workshop by Professor Achille Mbembe (U of Witwatersrand). Both events will feature Mbembe's new book, Critique of Black Reason (2017 - Duke UP). Other workshop panelists include Laurent Dubois (Duke), Juan Obarrio (Johns Hopkins) and Christina Mobley (UVA). 

 

In order to foster an intimate conversation, faculty and graduate students who wish to participate in the workshop (9/18, Wilson 142, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) should register here. Workshop readings drawn from Critique of Black Reason are available through the registration form. Space is limited, and refreshments and lunch will be available.

 

Professor Mbembe will deliver his lecture entitled "Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism" in Wilson Hall 142, from 5-6:30. There is no registration required for this event.

 

About the book:

 

In Critique of Black Reason eminent critic Achille Mbembe offers a capacious genealogy of the category of Blackness—from the Atlantic slave trade to the present—to critically reevaluate history, racism, and the future of humanity. Mbembe teases out the intellectual consequences of the reality that Europe is no longer the world's center of gravity while mapping the relations among colonialism, slavery, and contemporary financial and extractive capital. Tracing the conjunction of Blackness with the biological fiction of race, he theorizes Black reason as the collection of discourses and practices that equated Blackness with the nonhuman in order to uphold forms of oppression. Mbembe powerfully argues that this equation of Blackness with the nonhuman will serve as the template for all new forms of exclusion. With Critique of Black Reason, Mbembeoffers nothing less than a map of the world as it has been constituted through colonialism and racial thinking while providing the first glimpses of a more just future. 

 

About Achille Mbembe

 

Achille Mbembe is Research Professor in History and Politics at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He is coeditor of Johannesburg: The Elusive Metropolis, also published by Duke University Press, and the author of On the Postcolony as well as several books in French.

Achille Mbembe, "Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism"

September 18, 2017

Wilson 142 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Achille Mbembe, "Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism"

September 18, 2017

Wilson 142 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The Institute for the Humanites and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a workshop by Professor Achille Mbembe (U of Witwatersrand). Both events will feature Mbembe's new book, Critique of Black Reason (2017 - Duke UP). Other workshop panelists include Laurent Dubois (Duke), Juan Obarrio (Johns Hopkins) and Christina Mobley (UVA). 

 

In order to foster an intimate conversation, faculty and graduate students who wish to participate in the workshop (9/18, Wilson 142, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.) should register here. Workshop readings drawn from Critique of Black Reason are available through the registration form. Space is limited, and refreshments and lunch will be available.

 

Professor Mbembe will deliver his lecture entitled "Negative Messianism in the Age of Animism" in Wilson Hall 142, from 5-6:30. There is no registration required for this event.

 

About the book:

 

In Critique of Black Reason eminent critic Achille Mbembe offers a capacious genealogy of the category of Blackness—from the Atlantic slave trade to the present—to critically reevaluate history, racism, and the future of humanity. Mbembe teases out the intellectual consequences of the reality that Europe is no longer the world's center of gravity while mapping the relations among colonialism, slavery, and contemporary financial and extractive capital. Tracing the conjunction of Blackness with the biological fiction of race, he theorizes Black reason as the collection of discourses and practices that equated Blackness with the nonhuman in order to uphold forms of oppression. Mbembe powerfully argues that this equation of Blackness with the nonhuman will serve as the template for all new forms of exclusion. With Critique of Black Reason, Mbembeoffers nothing less than a map of the world as it has been constituted through colonialism and racial thinking while providing the first glimpses of a more just future. 

 

About Achille Mbembe

 

Achille Mbembe is Research Professor in History and Politics at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. He is coeditor of Johannesburg: The Elusive Metropolis, also published by Duke University Press, and the author of On the Postcolony as well as several books in French.

Pages