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"Humanities Informatics," CHCI Annual Conference

June 13, 2018

University of Virginia |

"Humanities Informatics," CHCI Annual Conference

June 13, 2018

University of Virginia |

2018 Annual Meeting
 

Humanities Informatics

Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia
June 13-17, 2018

 

Big data is now ubiquitous across myriad domains: politics, war, security, environment, health, media, art, culture and finance. New frontiers in information sciences have expanded our understanding of the human through advances in genetics and artificial intelligence (AI). Google and Facebook are at the forefront of research on AI. Historically linked to the rise of cybernetics in the 1950s, the penetration of big data and machine learning in our lives through advances in social media, cloud computing, robotics, epigenetics and cyber surveillance, have transformed our understanding of social belonging, political agency, knowledge production, privacy and autonomy.

 

Humanities Informatics is emerging as a new field in response to these developments. There are clear connections here to the work done in digital humanities, including the manipulation and visualization of data. But humanities informatics is less concerned with the actual computation of data than it is with the ways in which data structures and algorithms inform political economy, humanistic cultural production, human scientific endeavors, and studies of the evolution of human life itself.

 

Is new media technology making democratic politics impossible? What are the implications for the university of knowledge and information explosion unleashed by large corporations such as Google? How has social life been transformed by new media technologies? What transformations have emerged in art and performative cultures with the impact of interactive media technologies? Should we view the digital as a step-change in the technologies of communication and in epistemology? As the equivalent of the invention of the printing press? When algorithms make decisions, is there any room for discretion? How has our understanding of the ‘human’ been transformed by advances in genetic engineering and artificial intelligence?

 

A CHCI conference on Humanities Informatics will showcase the power of the humanities to address these urgent questions about the ‘human’ in our information age.

A special panel entitled, ‘#Charlottesville: August 11 & 12’ will focus on the eruption of neo-fascist violence in contemporary America. Charlottesville, the location of the conference, is also the site of neo-Nazi and white supremacist violence that shook the United States in the summer of 2017 and garnered global media attention. The panel will revisit the legacies of slavery, the civil war, the history of confederate monuments, and white supremacist movements in Virginia, a historic region that exists on the fault-line of a deep racial division that was foundational to the establishment of the United States as a nation. Speakers include Kirt Von Daacke, Chair of the UVA Presidential Commission on Slavery, and Deborah McDowell, Director, The Carter Woodson Institute of African and African-American Studies.

 

Visit the CHCI website for more information. 

Irrationality and the Contemporary

May 4, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am

Irrationality and the Contemporary

May 4, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am

 

"Irrationality & the Contemporary" is a one-day symposium, scheduled for Friday, May 4, 2018, in Wilson Hall 142. In light of the ongoing climate of skepticism and other signs of the retreat of liberalism around the world, our panels and keynote presentation will consider the play between rationality and irrationality in the post-1945 period and especially in our public discourse, bringing together scholars from diverse disciplines to reflect on forms of irrationality that appear in our politics, new media, the university, and neoliberal institutions. Professor Wendy Chun (Modern Culture and Media, Brown University) will deliver our keynote lecture. Cumulatively, the symposium strives to illuminate conditions constitutive of the contemporary moment, as well as historical forces that may be contributing to the incremental dissolution of infrastructures that support liberal democracy. 

 

This event is made possible by generous support from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, New Literary History, the Department of Politics, the Department of English, and the Food, Fuels, and Forests Working Group.

 

Tentative Lineup:

Wendy Chun, Modern Culture and Media, Brown

Jonathan Flatley, English, Wayne State

Deborah Lawrence, Environmental Science, University of Virginia

Jennifer Fleissner, English, Indiana University

Bradley Pasanak, English, University of Virginia

Elizabeth Losh, English and American Studies, William & Mary

Lisa Friedman, Reporter, The New York Times

Austin Hetrick, English (PhD Candidate, event organizer), University of Virginia

Jap-Nanak Makkar, English (PhD Candidate, event organizer), University of Virginia

Amitav Ghosh in Conversation with Roy Scranton

April 27, 2018

Robertson Hall 120 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh in Conversation with Roy Scranton

April 27, 2018

Robertson Hall 120 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Friday, April 27 | 4:30 - 6:00 p.m, Robertson Hall 120: Amitav Ghosh will be in conversation with Roy Scranton, author of Learning to Die in the Anthropocene.

 

About Amitav Ghosh

 

Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of ReasonThe Shadow LinesIn An Antique LandDancing in CambodiaThe Calcutta ChromosomeThe Glass PalaceThe Hungry Tide, and the three volumes of The Ibis Trilogy; Sea of PoppiesRiver of Smoke and Flood of Fire.The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award.

 

Amitav Ghosh’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and he has served on the Jury of the Locarno Film Festival (Switzerland) and the Venice Film Festival (2001). Amitav Ghosh’s essays have been published in The New YorkerThe New Republic and The New York Times. His essays have been published by Penguin India (The Imam and the Indian) and Houghton Mifflin USA (Incendiary Circumstances). He has taught in many universities in India and the USA, including Delhi University, Columbia, Queens College and Harvard.  In January 2007 he was awarded the Padma Shri, one of India’s highest honors, by the President of India. In 2010, Amitav Ghosh was awarded honorary doctorates by Queens College, New York, and the Sorbonne, Paris. Along with Margaret Atwood, he was also a joint winner of a Dan David Award for 2010. In 2011 he was awarded the International Grand Prix of the Blue Metropolis Festival in Montreal. 

The future of literary history: Mass-digitized collections, literary data, and American fiction in the Antipodes

April 24, 2018

Brooks Hall Commons (Anthropology Building) | 4:00 - 5:30pm followed by a DH Mixer from 5:30 - 7pm

The future of literary history: Mass-digitized collections, literary data, and American fiction in the Antipodes

April 24, 2018

Brooks Hall Commons (Anthropology Building) | 4:00 - 5:30pm followed by a DH Mixer from 5:30 - 7pm

Background

In the 19th century, newspapers were the main publishers of fiction in Australia; in the 21st century, the National Library of Australia’s Trove database represents the largest collection of mass-digitized historical newspapers internationally. These conditions present an opportunity to explore the capacity of mass-digitized collections to transform how we approach and understand literary history. Analyzing Trove uncovered more than 21,000 novels, novellas, and short stories published in Australian newspapers between 1865 and 1914. This fiction encompasses canonical works, alongside many hundreds of previously unrecorded titles, and represents titles from around the world, with extensive publication of British, Australian, and American stories, significant amounts of French and German literature in translation, as well as fiction from as far afield as Austria, Canada, Holland, Japan, South Africa, Sweden, Russia, and beyond.

Bode’s research considers the new insights into past literary cultures, as well as the new practices for present and future literary history, that mass-digitized collections enable. She first explores how these discoveries expand the transnational history of American literature, by investigating the publication and reception of American fiction in 19th-century Australia. Bode then suggests new research practices that mass-digitized collections necessitate and enable for literary history. In her lecture, she will focus on the approaches to data required of literary history in the digital age, as well as the new collaborations and publics for literary history that data-rich research makes possible.

About Katherine Bode

Katherine Bode is Associate Professor of Literary and Textual Studies in the School of Literature, Languages, and Linguistics at the Australian National University in Canberra. She has published extensively in literary studies, digital humanities, and book history, and her latest monograph, A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History, is forthcoming with University of Michigan Press in July 2018.

All are welcome to attend both the talk and DH Mixer following, with or without registering here. We ask you to register so we can get a rough count for the caterer. Thank you!

 

Amitav Ghosh, "The Great Uprooting: Migration and Movement in the Age of Climate Change"

April 23, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh, "The Great Uprooting: Migration and Movement in the Age of Climate Change"

April 23, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

About Amitav Ghosh

 

Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of ReasonThe Shadow LinesIn An Antique LandDancing in CambodiaThe Calcutta ChromosomeThe Glass PalaceThe Hungry Tide, and the three volumes of The Ibis Trilogy; Sea of PoppiesRiver of Smoke and Flood of Fire.The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award.

 

Amitav Ghosh’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and he has served on the Jury of the Locarno Film Festival (Switzerland) and the Venice Film Festival (2001). Amitav Ghosh’s essays have been published in The New YorkerThe New Republic and The New York Times. His essays have been published by Penguin India (The Imam and the Indian) and Houghton Mifflin USA (Incendiary Circumstances). He has taught in many universities in India and the USA, including Delhi University, Columbia, Queens College and Harvard.  In January 2007 he was awarded the Padma Shri, one of India’s highest honors, by the President of India. In 2010, Amitav Ghosh was awarded honorary doctorates by Queens College, New York, and the Sorbonne, Paris. Along with Margaret Atwood, he was also a joint winner of a Dan David Award for 2010. In 2011 he was awarded the International Grand Prix of the Blue Metropolis Festival in Montreal. 

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Charlotte Rogers, Christopher Krentz, William Hitchcock)

April 20, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Charlotte Rogers, Christopher Krentz, William Hitchcock)

April 20, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium

April 20

Wilson 142

 

 

 

9.30-10.30am

Charlotte Rogers. Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese

El ciclón: An Ecocritical Approach to the Hurricane in Gabriel García Márquez’s The Autumn of the Patriarch. 

 

10.30-11.30am

William Hitchcock, Corcoran Department of History

“Constructing Refugees:The Hungarians of 1956.”

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Christopher Krentz, Department of English

“War, Neoliberalism, and Disability Human Rights in Two Chris Abani Novels”

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Romanticism, Now and Then

April 20, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:00 am

Romanticism, Now and Then

April 20, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:00 am

Romanticism, Now and Then: 

New Literary History Workshop

April 20-21, 2018

University of Virginia

This intensive two-day workshop will bring together literary historians, musicologists, and art historians to reflect on the present, past, and future of Romanticism, as an interpretive project and a field of interdisciplinary inquiry. Hosted by New Literary History and the Institute of the Humanities & Global Culture at the University of Virginia, the workshop begins with opening remarks on Friday, April 20 at 1:00, and concludes with a discussion on Saturday, April 21, from 5:00-5:30. The event is free and open to the public. How has the Romanticist interpretive project developed in recent decades, particularly in dialogue with literary theory and historiography? In this bicentennial era of the Romantic period, what connections and modes of remembering obtain, and to what ends? In what senses does Romanticism imply a method, a form, a politics? What are the abiding keywords, concepts, and challenges of Romanticism within and across disciplines, and what questions or arenas of thought have ceased to be central? What futures do you see for Romanticism as a conceptual and/or professional field?

  

Friday April 20

Institute of the Humanities & Global Culture

Wilson Hall Room 142

 

1:00-1:15

Opening remarks

Bruce Holsinger and Andrew Stauffer

New Literary History and Department of English, University of Virginia

 

1:15-2:15

“Romantic Difficulty”

Anahid Nersessian

Department of English, UCLA

 

2:30-3:30

Le romantisme en Haïti: History, Historiography, Form”

Marlene Daut

Program in American Studies & Carter G. Woodson Institute for 

African-American and African Studies, University of Virginia

 

3:45-4:45

“The Question of Sensibility”

James Chandler

Department of English, University of Chicago

 

Saturday April 21

Institute of the Humanities & Global Culture

Wilson Hall Room 142

 

9:30-10:30

“The Arabesque from Kant to Comics”

Cordula Grewe 

Department of Art History, Indiana University

 

10:45-11:45

 “Romantic Musical Aesthetics and the Transmigration of Soul”

Holly Watkins

Department of Musicology, Eastman School of Music and

University of Rochester

 

1:30-2:30

“Romantic Subjects and Iambic Laws:

Episodes in the Early History of Contract Negotiations”

Jerome McGann

Department of English, University of Virginia

 

2:45-3:45

“Kindred Spirits: Transatlantic Romantic Poetics”

Virginia Jackson

Departments of English and 

Comparative Literature, UC-Irvine

 

4:00-5:00

“Romanticism and the Avowal of Coevalness”

Tristram Wolff

Departments of English and Comparative 

Literature, Northwestern University

 

5:00-5:30

Closing discussion

 

The Humanities and Everyday Life: An afternoon of celebrating the Public Humanities

April 13, 2018

Wilson 142 | 2:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The Humanities and Everyday Life: An afternoon of celebrating the Public Humanities

April 13, 2018

Wilson 142 | 2:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The Humanities and Everyday Life

An afternoon of celebrating the Public Humanities

 

Inflammatory Objects: What We Keep and Why

2:00-3:30pmFriday April 13

Wilson 142

 

The Art in Public Working Group invites you to participate in a panel and discussion

that will explore the public and private lives of racially and/or politically charged objects, as well as the practices surrounding their collection, curation, and exhibition. The panel will consist of several short presentations about specific objects and practices meant to provoke a lively discussion amongst panelists and participants. The panel will be followed by coffee and snacks.

 

Panelists include:

Molly Schwartzburg (Special Collections)

Lara Musser (English)

Kelli Shermeyer (English)

Catherine Addington (Spanish)

Benjamin Romero Salado (Spanish)

Pasuth Thothaveesansuk (History and Statistics)

 

Coffee Break and Meet the Lab

3:30-4:30pmFriday April 13

Wilson 142

 

The IHGC Graduate Student Public Humanities Lab invites you to grab a snack and meet the 2017-2018 lab members. At 4:00pm there will be a brief reporting session where attendees can learn about the initiatives accomplished by this year’s working groups and learn about how they can apply to the lab for the 2018-2019 academic year.

 

The Humanities and Everyday Life: An Open Forum with Michael Levenson

4:30-5:30pmFriday April 13

Wilson 142

 

The IHGC Public Humanities Lab concludes the afternoon with an open discussion of Professor Michael Levenson's book The Humanities and Everyday Life (Oxford 2017). The book investigates the many points of contact and exchange between the academic humanities and its "everyday" others: Wikipedia entry editing, family genealogy, and museum-going, for example. Illuminating their shared and divergent histories, the book invites us to explore the fecundity of these others in order to shed light on the basic questions driving humanities research.

 

In Chapter 5, "Places to Think," Professor Levenson addresses the popularity of personal collecting and museum-making. Our discussion will begin by responding to the presentations given earlier in the afternoon on the panel "Inflammatory Objects." Collecting, preserving, and remembering are deeply humanistic acts, but they often create as many problems as they attempt to solve. Together, we'll ask how the academic humanities can inform such practices and what they tell us about the organization of knowledge on highly local, personal scales. We will also focus on chapter 3, which considers the role of "Experts and Expertise" in everyday life.

 

The first fifteen participants to sign up for the discussion will receive a free copy of Professor Levenson's book. Participants are free to read and raise questions or comments about other parts of the book; this brief description is but a starting point.

 

Please e-mail DeVan Ard (dda8xx) with questions or if you'd like to be part of the discussion.

 

Closing Reception

5:30-6:30pm

Wilson 117 and Wilson Lobby

 

All are welcome!

 

Enduring Questions, New Methods

April 12, 2018

Minor Hall 110 | 4:00 pm

Enduring Questions, New Methods

April 12, 2018

Minor Hall 110 | 4:00 pm

THURSDAY, 12 APRIL

 

4:00-5:30PM – Haiti and the Digital Humanities
Minor Hall 110

Nathan H. Dize, Julia Gaffield,  Marlene L. Daut
– moderated by Kaiama L. Glover

 

5:45PM – Welcome Remarks 
Deborah McDowell

Clark 107

 

6:00-7:30PM – Building Programs for Haitian Studies in the United States

Cécile Accilien, Laurent Dubois, Claudine Michel, Jean Eddy Saint-Paul
– moderated by Robert Fatton, Jr.

 

7:30PM – Reception

 

FRIDAY, 13 APRIL

Minor Hall 110

 

9:30-11:00AM – Politics and Intellectual History

Jean Casimir, Sara Johnson, Délide Joseph, Matthew Smith
– moderated by Marlene L. Daut

 

COFFEE

 

11:15AM-12:30PM – Translating Haitian Literature

Kaiama L. Glover, Deborah Jenson, Nadève Ménard
– moderated by Njelle Hamilton

 

LUNCH

 

2:00-3:30PM  – Thinking Vodou: Faith, the Archive, the Law

Kyrah Malika Daniels, Colin Dayan, Christina Mobley, Kate Ramsey
–moderated by Gina Athena Ulysse

 

COFFEE

 

3:45-5:00PM – Haitian Kreyòl

Michel DeGraff, Mariana Past, Jacques Pierre
– moderated by Christina Mobley

 

5:00-5:30PM Closing Remarks

 

For more information: http://enduringquestions.net

Sanctuary and Belonging Conference

April 11, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 6:00 pm

Sanctuary and Belonging Conference

April 11, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 6:00 pm

"Poetry and the World" Symposium

April 6, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

"Poetry and the World" Symposium

April 6, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

"POETRY AND THE WORLD" SYMPOSIUM

Friday, April 6, 2018

10am-5pm, Nau Hall Auditorium (Nau 101)

Nau Hall Auditorium (Nau 101)

Free Admission

10am-5pm

 

SCHEDULE:

10am - Noon - Panel 1
     Janet Neigh
         “Oral Memory in Digital Territories” 
     Yasser Elhariry
         “Strait, Sea, Poem: Emmanuel Hocquard" 
     Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak
         “Persian Poetry in the Persianate World and Beyond” 
    
Noon - 1:30pm - Lunch Break

1:30pm - 3:30pm - Panel 2
     Eric Hayot
          "Blazon: Between the Who and the What"
     Juliana Spahr
          "Poetry’s Stubborn Nationalism in the World"
     Susan Stewart
          "Poetry and the (Natural) World"
    
4:00pm - 5:00pm - Daljit Nagra

Deborah Baker, "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative"

April 3, 2018

Solarium of the Colonnade Club | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Deborah Baker, "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative"

April 3, 2018

Solarium of the Colonnade Club | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

The Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a reading with Deborah Baker, who is one of the special highlights of the IHGC’s annual 2018 Humanities Week (April 2-6).

 

On Tuesday, April 3 at 5:00 p.m in the Solarium of the Colonnade Club, Baker will deliver a lecture entitled "Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative." She will also be reading from her current book, The Last Englishmen.

 

About Deborah Baker

 

Deborah Baker’s first full-length book, a biography of the American modernist poet Laura Riding, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 1994. After many years as a book editor in various New York publishing houses, she wrote A Blue Hand, an account of Allen Ginsberg’s travels in India that also traced the idea of India in the American imagination.  While a Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, she researched and wrote The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award in Non-fiction. Her current book, The Last Englishmen, for which she received support from the Guggenheim and Whiting Foundations. will be published by Graywolf Press this summer.

Humanities Week 2018

April 2, 2018

Humanities Week 2018

April 2, 2018

Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures (IHGC) at the University of Virginia

Humanities Week 2018: Civil Resistance, April 2 – 7

The theme of the IHGC’s annual, student-produced Humanities Week 2018—“Civil Resistance”—was inspired by a desire to respond to the neo-fascist, ‘Unite the Right’ rally last summer here in Charlottesville. The violence of August 11-12, 2017, awakened our community’s awareness of racism and extremist beliefs and violence, and spurred a variety of positive, constructive responses on approaching prejudice, injustice, and inequality. This student-produced Humanities Week 2018 includes presentations, workshops, games, poetry, art exhibits, and other activities planned by a diverse group of students, faculty, and community members who are challenging the status quo to bring awareness and change through peaceful resistance. We’ll explore the many ways that these movers and shakers are using art, literature, music, dance, and other tools of the humanities to express their sentiments and declare their rights.

Monday, April 2

  • 5:00-6:30pm @ Brooks Hall Commons, “Revealing Unsung Heroes to Inspire Change,” a panel discussion with filmmaker Chris Farina and 3rd-year students Isabella Ciambotti and Emma Hendrix.
  • 7:00 – 8:30pm @ Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge (room 229A), “Because Everything is Terrible,” a poetry reading by Paul Guest, sponsored by the Disability Studies Initiative.

 

Tuesday, April 3

  • 11am – 1pm @ the UVA Amphitheater, “Constructing Dissent,” UVA’s Puzzle Poetry Group diplays their largest puzzle yet.
  • 5:00pm-6:30pm @ the Colonnade Club Solarium, “Tricks of Perspective: Reimagining the Second World War Narrative,” a reading by Deborah Baker.

 

Wednesday, April 4

  • 7:00pm-8:30pm in Diane D’Costa’s Lawn Room, “Artistic Expression workshop,” with UVA 4th-year and lawn resident Diane D’Costa.

 

Thursday, April 5

  • 11:30am-12:30pm in Wilson 142, “Civility, Civil Rights, and Civil Resistance: Exploring the Charlottesville Syllabus and Direct Action from Grounds,” with Sophie Abramowitz, Maya Hislop, Eva Latterner, and Marc Mazique in association with the Graduate Student Coalition for Liberation (GSCL).

 

Friday, April 6

  • 4:30 – 7pm, Campbell 160 and the Fralin Art Museum, “Art of Protest,” presentations & a panel discussion with Emily Monaghan, Samuel Johnson, Charlotte Hennessy, Susannah Townes, University Museum Interns, & others.

Global Knowledges, Local Universities

March 22, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 8:45 am

Global Knowledges, Local Universities

March 22, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 8:45 am

 

The Global Studies Program has organized a conference to engage local, national, and international scholars in the field of Global Studies to examine the debates over the meaning of 'the global,' to outline prospects and challenges for Global Scholarship, and to imagine the contribution of Global Studies to an emerging 21st century university.

 

With six panels in two days, the conference will feature 22 scholars as they discuss topics such as: Meanings of Globalism in Contemporary Academia, Global Studies in Liberal Arts, Global Political Economy, Global Studies and Area Studies, Global South, and Local Meets the Global: Engaging with the Community. 

 

Click here for more information. 

Bologna Academy Graduate Conference, "Race and Division of Labor in Global Western Empires, 1791-1888"

March 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:30 am - 5:30 pm

Bologna Academy Graduate Conference, "Race and Division of Labor in Global Western Empires, 1791-1888"

March 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:30 am - 5:30 pm

Geoff Eley, "Fascism and Antifascism, 1920-2020"

February 19, 2018

Newcomb Hall Gallery | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Geoff Eley, "Fascism and Antifascism, 1920-2020"

February 19, 2018

Newcomb Hall Gallery | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

 

Geoff Eley is the Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He works on modern German and European History, nationalism, fascism, film and history, and historiography. His earliest works were Reshaping the German Right: Radical Nationalism and Political Change after Bismarck (1980, 1991) and The Peculiarities of German History (with David Blackbourn, 1980, 1984). More recent books include Forging Democracy: The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000 (2002), A Crooked Line: From Cultural History to the History of Society (2005), The Future of Class in History (with Keith Nield, 2007), and Nazism as Fascism: Violence, Ideology, and the Ground of Consent in Germany, 1930-1945 (2013). Eley's edited or co-edited books include The Goldhagen Effect: History, Memory, Nazism (2000), Citizenship and National Identity in Twentieth-Century Germany (with Jan Palmowski, 2007), German Colonialism in a Global Age (2014), and German Modernities from Wilhelm to Weimar: A Contest of Futures (2016). He is currently writing a general history of Europe in the twentieth century.

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Nizar Hermes, Christina Mobley, Murad Idris)

February 16, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Nizar Hermes, Christina Mobley, Murad Idris)

February 16, 2018

Wilson 142 | 9:30 am - 1:30 pm

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday February 16, 2018

9:30am - 1:30pm

 

9:30 am - 10:30 am

Nizar Hermes, Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures

"Ibn Sharaf (d. 1067)’s Elegy for the City of Qayrawan"

 

10:30 am - 11:30 am

Christina Mobley, Assistant Professor of History

"Vodou History: the Kongo History of the Haitian Revolution"

 

11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Murad Idris, Assistant Professor of Politics

"Reading Ibn Tufayl in the Modern Middle East: Philosophy, Colonialism, and Political Fantasies"

 

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch

Oceans of Exchange: Art, Indigeneity, and the 21st Century Museum

February 2, 2018

Harrison Small Auditorium | 10:00 am - 2:30 pm

Oceans of Exchange: Art, Indigeneity, and the 21st Century Museum

February 2, 2018

Harrison Small Auditorium | 10:00 am - 2:30 pm

Joshua Reeves, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance & Media Escalation

February 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 6:00 pm

Joshua Reeves, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance & Media Escalation

February 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 6:00 pm

Please join us for the first Surveillance and Infrastructure research group, part of the Humanities and Informatics lab, lecture by Joshua Reeves. His talk, "Killer Apps: Military Surveillance and Media Escalation" will take place in Wilson 142 at 6:00 next Thursday, Feb. 1st. This is followed by a workshop where we'll discuss chapters from his book, Citizen Spy, on Friday at noon over lunch in Wilson 142. 

Isabel Hofmeyr, Workshop on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

November 17, 2017

Wilson 142 | 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Isabel Hofmeyr, Workshop on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

November 17, 2017

Wilson 142 | 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
presents a workshop with
Professor Isabel Hofmeyr (NYU and Witswatersrand)
on
Indian Ocean Worlds

 

Program

 

12.00-1.00pm: Lunch

 

1.00-1.15pm: Introduction

 

1.15-1.45pm: Isabel Hofmeyr on "Indian Ocean Worlds"

 

1.45-2.00pm: Fahad Bishara (respondent)

 

2.00-2.15pm: Maya Boutaghou (respondent)

 

2.15-3.30pm: Discussion  and Q & A 

 

Bio: Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor of African Literature and Indian Ocean Cultures at the University of the Witswatersand. Her research interests include postcolonialism; African literature; Southern African literary studies; oral history and literature; John Bunyan; seventeenth century studies; textual transnationalism; Africa-India interactions; Indian Ocean studies; histories of the book and print culture; and histories of reading and writing. Her current work focuses on Africa and its intellectual trajectories in the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Her earlier scholarship examined ways of historicising oral literature and its interactions with literacy. As South Africa’s transition opened the country up to democracy and globalisation, Hofmeyr turned her attention to themes of transnationalism and textual circulation. More recently she has explored textual circulation in the Global South with a focus on the Indian Ocean. Her work addresses questions of Africa’s intellectual place in the world and the material and aesthetic history of texts and their transnational circulation. She is the author of Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading (Harvard, 2013), The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History of The Pilgrim's Progress (Princeton, 2004), We Spend Our Years As a Tale that is Told: Oral Historical Narrative in a South African Chiefdom (Heinemann, 1994).

Religious and Cultural Appropriation, Then and Now: Round Table Workshop

November 10, 2017

Rouss Hall 223 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Religious and Cultural Appropriation, Then and Now: Round Table Workshop

November 10, 2017

Rouss Hall 223 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspective | Workshop with Sarah Nuttall

November 7, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspective | Workshop with Sarah Nuttall

November 7, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

The Institute for the Humanities and Global Cultures cordially invites students and faculty to attend a lecture and a workshop with Sarah Nuttall, Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Director of the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. 

 

On Monday, November 6 at 5:00 p.m, Professor Nuttall will deliver her lecture entitled "The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art" in the Bryan Hall faculty lounge. There is no registration required for this event.

 

And on Tuesday, November 7, from 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m, Professor Nuttall will offer a workshop, "Spaces and Subjectivities: South African Perspectives." The workshop will be held in Wilson Hall 142. Faculty and students who wish to participate in the workshop should register here. Three workshop readings are available through the registration form. Coffee and refreshments will be available at the beginning of the event.

 

About Sarah Nuttall

 

Sarah Nuttall is Director of the Wits Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg. A literary scholar by training, Sarah’s varied research interests and prolific publication record have established her as a leading cultural commentator and critic in South Africa as well as one of the leading scholars of her generation. She has lectured at the University of Stellenbosch and has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard, Yale and Duke. Sarah has edited several path-breaking books. Her influential monograph, Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Post-apartheid, explores mutuality, transgression and embodiment in contemporary South Africa.Sarah has published in various journals including in Cultural Studies, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Journal of South African Studies, Public Culture, Third Text and Social Dynamics. She is a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Southern African Studies, Humanity, Cultural Studies, Social Dynamics, English Studies in Africa, and English Academy Review. She serves on the advisory board of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory. 

Sarah Nuttall, “The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art”

November 6, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Sarah Nuttall, “The Planetary and the Posthuman: Perspectives from African Theory, Fiction and Art”

November 6, 2017

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Bio: Sarah Nuttall is Director of the Wits Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg. A literary scholar by training, Sarah’s varied research interests and prolific publication record have established her as a leading cultural commentator and critic in South Africa as well as one of the leading scholars of her generation. She has lectured at the University of Stellenbosch and has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard, Yale and Duke. Sarah has edited several path-breaking books. Her influential monograph, Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Post-apartheid, explores mutuality, transgression and embodiment in contemporary South Africa.Sarah has published in various journals including in Cultural Studies, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Journal of South African Studies, Public Culture, Third Text and Social Dynamics. She is a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Southern African Studies, Humanity, Cultural Studies, Social Dynamics, English Studies in Africa, and English Academy Review. She serves on the advisory board of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory. 

Poulomi Saha, "Dropped Stitches: Fabrics of Life & the Gendered Production of Postcolonial Bangladesh"

November 3, 2017

Wilson 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Poulomi Saha, "Dropped Stitches: Fabrics of Life & the Gendered Production of Postcolonial Bangladesh"

November 3, 2017

Wilson 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Poulomi Saha is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley, where she teaches courses in postcolonial studies, gender and sexuality theory, and ethnic American literature.

 

Her research and teaching agenda spans eastward and forward from the late 19th century decline of British colonial rule in the Indian Ocean through to the Pacific and the rise of American global power and domestic race relations in the 20th century. Professor Saha is interested in developing an expansive view of empire and of what constitutes Anglophone literature, routed not primarily through Great Britain and Western Europe but rather through circuits of affiliation and encounter between Asia and the Americas.

 

She is currently completing her first monograph, An Empire of Touch: Feminine Political Labor & The Fabrication of East Bengal, 1905-2015, which turns attention to East Bengal, the historical antecedent of Bangladesh, today an international exemplar of development driven by gender-targeted foreign aid. An Empire of Touch recounts a new narrative of female political labor under empire, spanning from anticolonial nationalism to neoliberal globalization, through text and textile. It follows the historical traces of how women have claimed their labor, making what has been customarily seen as “merely” intimate and domestic into appreciable political acts.

 

Her work has been published in differences and The Journal of Modern Literature.

Cities of the Global South Symposium

November 1, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Cities of the Global South Symposium

November 1, 2017

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:30 pm - 6:00 pm

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