University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

News

Mellon Fellows Symposium (Matthew Hedstrom and Jennifer Rubenstein)

April 19, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium (Matthew Hedstrom and Jennifer Rubenstein)

April 19, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

 

 

10.30-11.30am

Matthew Hedstrom, Associate Professor, Religious Studies and American Studies

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Jennifer Rubenstein, Associate Professor, Department of Politics

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Matthew Hedstrom teaches in the Department of Religious Studies and the Program in American Studies at the University of Virginia. As a historian he specializes in religion and culture in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His central questions probe the intersections of American modernity and Protestant and post-Protestant religious modernity in the United States. He also has longstanding and ongoing interests in the history of the book, especially as it applies to American religious history. Race, religion and psychology, the history of spirituality, mass culture, religious liberalism, cosmopolitanism and internationalism all figure into hisresearch and teaching. 
 

Jennifer Rubenstein is an associate professor of politics at the University of Virginia specializing in political theory. Her interests include the political role and ethical responsibilities of non-governmental organizations; global justice; non-ideal theory; democratic theory (especially theories of non-electoral representation and advocacy that attend to global inequalities); theories of office, and the role of imagination and experience in politics. She has published or forthcoming articles in Journal of Politics, Journal of Political Philosophy, Journal of Social Philosophy, and the British Journal of Political Science, as well as chapters in several edited volumes. She is currently finishing a book manuscript about the political ethics of international non-governmental humanitarian organizations, entitled Between Samaritans and States: the Political Ethics of Humanitarian INGOs. Before coming to UVa she was the Cotsen-Link post-doctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows at Princeton University. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago.

Global Novel Symposium

April 10, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am

Global Novel Symposium

April 10, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am

Details forthcoming. April 10-11, 2019 

Alexander Galloway (NYU, Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication)

March 18, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Alexander Galloway (NYU, Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication)

March 18, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Alexander R. Galloway is a writer and computer programer working on issues in philosophy, technology, and theories of mediation. He is author of several books on digital media and critical theory, including The Interface Effect (Polity, 2012). His collaboration with Eugene Thacker and McKenzie Wark, Excommunication: Three Inquiries in Media and Mediation, has recently been published by the University of Chicago Press. With Jason E. Smith, Galloway co-translated the Tiqqun book Introduction to Civil War (Semiotext[e], 2010). For ten years he worked with RSG on CarnivoreKriegspiel and other software projects. Galloway's newest project is a monograph on the work of François Laruelle, published in October 2014.

 

Galloway has given over two hundred talks both across the U.S. and in ten countries around the world. His writings have been translated into eleven languages. He is recipient of a number of grants and awards including a Creative Capital grant (2006) and a Golden Nica in the 2002 Prix Ars Electronica (Linz, Austria). The New York Times has described his practice as "conceptually sharp, visually compelling and completely attuned to the political moment."

 

A member of the NYU faculty since 2002, Galloway has also held visiting posts at the University of Pennsylvania (Spring 2012) and Harvard University (Fall 2016).

 

 

 

Mellon Fellows Symposium (Shankar Nair and Ricardo Padrón)

March 1, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium (Shankar Nair and Ricardo Padrón)

March 1, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

 

 

10.30-11.30am

Shankar Nair, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Ricardo Padrón, Associate Professor of Spanish

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Shankar Nair's general field of interest is the religious and intellectual history of the Indian subcontinent, particularly as it relates to broader traditions of Sufism and Islamic philosophy, Qur'anic exegesis, and Hindu philosophy and theology (especially Advaita Vedanta and other forms of Hindu non-dualism).

 

Ricardo Padrón is an Associate Professor of Spanish who studies the literature and culture of the early modern Hispanic world, particularly questions of empire, space, and cartography.  Currently, he is completing a monograph about the transpacific imagination in sixteenth century Spanish imperialism. Provisionally entitled ReOrienting the Indies: Spain, the Pacific, and Asia, 1513-1609, the book will be published by the University of Chicago Press.  His research for this book has taken him to China, Japan, and the Philippines, and has been sponsored by U.Va.’s Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation, Arts & Sciences at U.Va., and the National Endowment for the Humanities.  He has also published on early modern poetry and historiography, and on the mapping of imaginary worlds in modern times.  Prof. Padrón is an active member of the Renaissance Society of America, in which he has served as Disciplinary Representative for the Americas section, and of the Latin American Studies Association.

Beyond Dreamings Symposium | Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection

February 21, 2019

Harrison Small Auditorium |

Beyond Dreamings Symposium | Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection

February 21, 2019

Harrison Small Auditorium |

 

In 1988, the exhibition Dreamings: The Art of Aboriginal Australia at the Asia Society in New York City catapulted Indigenous Australian art onto the world stage. Thirty years later, Beyond Dreamings explores the legacies of this important exhibition, revealing the ways in which Indigenous Australian artists have forged one of the most globally significant art movements of our time.

 

Curated by nine graduate students at UVA, Beyond Dreamings features key artworks from the original 1988 exhibition, alongside recent works that show the continuing diversity and dynamism of Indigenous Australian art.

 

Elizabeth Paravisini-Gebert (Vassar College)

January 23, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Elizabeth Paravisini-Gebert (Vassar College)

January 23, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Elizabeth Paravisini-Gebert works in the fields of literature, ecocriticism and environmental history, art history, and cultural studies, specializing in the multidisciplinary, comparative study of the Caribbean. Growing up in native Puerto Rico, she became fascinated by the many cultural connections between Caribbean peoples despite our different histories and languages and have made that the subject of my research and teaching. Professor Paravisini-Gebert is based in the Hispanic Studies Department at Vassar College and is a member of the Programs in Environmental Studies, Latin American Studies, International Studies, and Women’s Studies. She is currently working on The Amazon Parrots of the Caribbean: An Environmental Biography, a new book project, and on a translation of Dominican author Pedro Vergés’ 1982 novel, Solo cenizas hallarás with her friend and colleague Margarite Fernández Olmos.

Jerome McGann (UVA), “Colonial Exceptionalism on Native Grounds: American Literature before American Literature”

November 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Jerome McGann (UVA), “Colonial Exceptionalism on Native Grounds: American Literature before American Literature”

November 16, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

The lecture collates material from the opening and closing chapters of my recently completed American Literature before American Literature. The book takes off from Constance Rourke’s insight into what she called “the roots of American culture”: that nearly all the cultural work of the British colonial period has a decisively “practical” focus. Equally decisive was the pressure point for the period’s practical issues: Contact between two radically different civilizations and their conflicted values, the one Early Modern, the other Neolithic. That “Exceptional” experience established a set of tense cultural norms and demands that prevail in American literature and culture to the present. 

 

Bio: Jerome McGann, the John Stewart Bryan University Professor, has been working primarily in American Studies for the past six years, though his interest in Romantic and post-Romantic poetry and poetics continues. He is preparing a study of American writing from 1790 to 1945, the sequel to American Literature before American Literature.

Ken Liu, "Betrayal with Integrity: Conformance and Estrangement in Translating Chinese Science Fiction"

November 8, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 5:00 PM

Ken Liu, "Betrayal with Integrity: Conformance and Estrangement in Translating Chinese Science Fiction"

November 8, 2018

Nau Hall 101 | 5:00 PM

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jarrett Zigon & Aynne Kokas)

November 2, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Jarrett Zigon & Aynne Kokas)

November 2, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium

November 2

Wilson 142

 

 

 

10.30-11.30am

Jarrett Zigon, William & Linda Porterfield Chair in Biomedical Ethics and Professor of Anthropology

"A War on People: Dying-with and the Relational Ethics and Politics of Community"

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Aynne Kokas, Assistant Professor, Department of Media Studies

"The New Cybersovereigns: Power, Control, and Data Between China and the United States"

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Jarrett Zigon's interests include the anthropology of moralities and ethics; the intertwining of humans, worlds and situations; political activity and theory; the intersection of anthropology and philosophy; the drug war; artificial intelligence and ethics; and data ethics. These interests are taken up from the perspective of an anthropology strongly influenced by post-Heideggerian continental philosophy and critical theory, the theoretical articulation of which he names critical hermeneutics.

 

Aynne Kokas is an assistant professor of media studies at the University of Virginia. Kokas’ work focuses on the intersections between Chinese and US media and technology industries. Her book, Hollywood Made in China (University of California Press 2017), examines the cultural, political and economic implications of US media investment in China as it becomes the world’s largest film market. Hollywood Made in China has been profiled or cited publications in seven languages and forty-two countries. Kokas’ research on China’s media industry has also appeared or is forthcoming in publications including PLOS OneGlobal Media and CommunicationThe Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Communication, and In Media Res

Leila Neti (Occidental College), “Global Fictions of History: Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone and the Kohinoor Diamond”

November 2, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Leila Neti (Occidental College), “Global Fictions of History: Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone and the Kohinoor Diamond”

November 2, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Bio: Professor Leila Neti's teaching and research interests focus on postcolonial and transnational literature, theory, and film, nineteenth century British literature, and cultural studies.  In particular, her courses examine film and literature with reference to the larger cultural, political, and social formations within which these works are produced and consumed. 

Joshua August “Gus” Skorburg (Duke University), "What Kinds of Data Science Research are Subject to Ethical Review?"

November 2, 2018

Gibson Room, Cocke Hall | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Joshua August “Gus” Skorburg (Duke University), "What Kinds of Data Science Research are Subject to Ethical Review?"

November 2, 2018

Gibson Room, Cocke Hall | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Bio: Joshua August Skorburg completed his PhD in Philosophy at the University of Oregon. His research is in applied ethics (bioethics, neuroethics, data ethics), moral psychology (virtue theory and feminist ethics), and the philosophy of cognitive science. In addition to the MIDS program, he is affiliated with the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke. He is currently working on a number of theoretical and empirical projects about the nature of self and identity.

Heekyoung Cho, “Rethinking World Literature through the Relations between Russian and East Asian Literatures”

November 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 pm

Heekyoung Cho, “Rethinking World Literature through the Relations between Russian and East Asian Literatures”

November 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 pm

Bio: Dr. Heekyoung Cho completed her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, writing a dissertation on the translation and adaptation of Russian literature in early twentieth-century Korea. She is the author of Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature (Harvard University Asia Center, 2016). Dr. Cho's other areas of interest include translation and the formation of national literature, modern Korean literature and its historiography, and Korean-Japanese-Russian cultural relations. At the UW, Dr. Cho teaches courses in Korean literature, culture, film, and language.

Puzzles, Bots & Poems: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Poetics, Structure, Design, and Constraint

October 26, 2018

Alderman Library 421 | 9:00 am

Puzzles, Bots & Poems: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Poetics, Structure, Design, and Constraint

October 26, 2018

Alderman Library 421 | 9:00 am

Puzzles, Bots, and Poetics

A Symposium hosted by the Puzzle Poetry Group and Scholars' Lab

 

Friday, October 26

 

9 AM - Kate Compton, Generative Art Workshop 

http://galaxykate.com/

 

2 PM - Tony Veale, University College Dublin 

"Game of Tropes II: A Clash of Symbols"

 

3 PM - Sarah Tindal Kareem, UCLA

"Chasing Daedalus"

 

4 PM - Louis Bury, CUNY Hostos

"'Rats Build Their Labyrinths': On the Psychology and Aesthetics of Puzzles"

 

 

Saturday, October 27

 

10 AM - Dennis Tenen, Columbia University

"Techniques of Industrial Modernism: Plot Robot"

 

11 AM - Whitney Sperrazza, University of Kansas 

"Blazonic (Un)making: Margaret Cavendish's 

Recipe Poems as Early Modern Maker Labs"

 

1 PM - Herbert Tucker, University of Virginia

Riddle Poems: A Discussion

 

2 PM - Bret Rothstein, Indiana University

"Secret Hardware Handshakes"

 

This event made possible by the support of the 

Page-Barbour Committee and UVa's IHGC

Lisa Parks (MIT), “Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror from 9/11 to Trump”

October 18, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Lisa Parks (MIT), “Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror from 9/11 to Trump”

October 18, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Lisa Parks is a media scholar and a 2018 MacArthur Fellow whose research focuses on three areas: satellite technologies and media cultures; critical studies of media infrastructures; and media, militarization and surveillance. Parks is the author of Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual (Duke UP, 2005), Rethinking Media Coverage: Vertical Mediation and the War on Terror (Routledge, 2018), and Mixed Signals: Media Infrastructures and Cultural Geographies (in progress). She is co-editor of: Life in the Age of Drone Warfare (Duke UP, 2017), Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures (U of Illinois, 2015), Down to Earth: Satellite Technologies, Industries and Cultures (Rutgers UP, 2012), Undead TV (Duke UP, 2007), and Planet TV: A Global Television Reader (NYU, 2003). Parks has held visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin, McGill University, University of Southern California, and the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been a PI on major research grants from the National Science Foundation and the US State Department, and has collaborated with artists and computer scientists. She is committed to exploring how greater understanding of media systems can inform and assist citizens, scholars and policymakers in the US and abroad to advance campaigns for technological literacy, creative expression, social justice, and human rights. Before joining the CMS/W faculty, Parks was Professor and former Department Chair of Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara, where she also served as Director of the Center for Information Technology and Society.

 

Paul Vierthaler Workshop (University of Leiden), "Visualizing Stylometric and Intertextual Relationships in Large Textual Corpora"

October 12, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Paul Vierthaler Workshop (University of Leiden), "Visualizing Stylometric and Intertextual Relationships in Large Textual Corpora"

October 12, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Talk:

“Where Did All These Rumors Come From? Computationally Identifying Intertextuality and Machine-Classifying Its Source in a Late Imperial Chinese Corpus” – October 11, 4pm – 7pm -- Lecture (4 - 5:30) & DH Mixer (5:30 - 7:00) in Wilson 142

Workshop: 

“Visualizing Stylometric and Intertextual Relationships in Large Textual Corpora” – October 12, 12pm-1:30pm, Wilson 142

 

Paul Vierthaler is a University Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of the Digital Humanities at Leiden University in the Netherlands. In his current monograph project, he analyzes how historical events are represented in “quasi-histories" written in late imperial China. In this work, he studies how information transforms in genre- and time-dependent ways across thousands of semi- to un-trustworthy texts. In order to facilitate rapid and rigorous research, Paul is interested in developing and adapting computational methods to analyze and visualize large natural language corpora. In his other work, he has been developing machine learning models to study the authorship of the famous late-Ming novel the Plum in the Golden Vase. Additionally, as a continuation of past work on quantitative bibliographic analysis, Paul is developing an extensible and mineable bibliographic database on public domain Chinese texts, which will be deployed in late 2018 or early 2019. In 2015-2016, Paul was a Visiting Assistant Professor and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Humanities at Boston College. Prior to that, he was an An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. In 2014, he was awarded a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures from Yale University.

 

Muhsin Al-Musawi (Columbia U), "The City in the Medieval and Modern Arabic Narrative"

October 12, 2018

Wilson Hall 301 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Muhsin Al-Musawi (Columbia U), "The City in the Medieval and Modern Arabic Narrative"

October 12, 2018

Wilson Hall 301 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Bio: Professor Muhsin al-Musawi is a literary critic and a scholar of classical and modern Arabic literature and comparative cultural studies. He taught for over two decades at universities in the Arab world before moving to Columbia University. He is the author of twenty-eight books (including four novels) and over sixty scholarly articles. He has been the editor of the Journal of Arabic Literature [ Brill Academic Publishers] since 2000.

 

Professor al-Musawi's teaching and research interests span several periods, trends, and genres. His books include: Scheherazade in England (1981); The Society of One Thousand and One Nights (2000); Anglo-Orient: Easterners in Textual Camps (2000); The Postcolonial Arabic Novel: Debating Ambivalence (2003); Arabic Poetry: Trajectories of Modernity and Tradition (2006); Reading Iraq: Culture and Power in Conflict (2006); The Islamic Context of the Thousand and One Nights (Columbia University Press, 2009); and Islam in the Street: The Dynamics of Arabic Literary Production (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009). He is also the editor of and a contributor to Arabic Literary Thresholds: Sites of Rhetorical Turn in Contemporary Scholarship (2009), and wrote the introduction and notes to the Barnes & Noble edition of The Thousand and One Nights, published in 2007. His most recent book is The Medieval Islamic Republic of Letters: Arabic Knowledge Construction (University of Notre Dame Press, April 2015). Professor al-Musawi was the recipient of the Owais Award in Literary Criticism in 2002.

Paul Vierthaler (University of Leiden), “Where Did All These Rumors Come From? Computationally Identifying Intertextuality and Machine-Classifying Its Source in a Late Imperial Chinese Corpus”

October 11, 2018

Brooks Hall Commons | 4:00 pm

Paul Vierthaler (University of Leiden), “Where Did All These Rumors Come From? Computationally Identifying Intertextuality and Machine-Classifying Its Source in a Late Imperial Chinese Corpus”

October 11, 2018

Brooks Hall Commons | 4:00 pm

“Where Did All These Rumors Come From? Computationally Identifying Intertextuality and Machine-Classifying Its Source in a Late Imperial Chinese Corpus” – October 11, 4pm – 7pm -- Lecture (4 - 5:30) & DH Mixer (5:30 - 7:00) in Wilson 142

 

Paul Vierthaler is a University Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of the Digital Humanities at Leiden University in the Netherlands. In his current monograph project, he analyzes how historical events are represented in “quasi-histories" written in late imperial China. In this work, he studies how information transforms in genre- and time-dependent ways across thousands of semi- to un-trustworthy texts. In order to facilitate rapid and rigorous research, Paul is interested in developing and adapting computational methods to analyze and visualize large natural language corpora. In his other work, he has been developing machine learning models to study the authorship of the famous late-Ming novel the Plum in the Golden Vase. Additionally, as a continuation of past work on quantitative bibliographic analysis, Paul is developing an extensible and mineable bibliographic database on public domain Chinese texts, which will be deployed in late 2018 or early 2019. In 2015-2016, Paul was a Visiting Assistant Professor and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Digital Humanities at Boston College. Prior to that, he was an An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. In 2014, he was awarded a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures from Yale University.

 

Poetry and Race Symposium

October 5, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Poetry and Race Symposium

October 5, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Poetry has long been a crucial space for constructing and deconstructing racial identities. What can we learn about race from poetry, and poetry from race? How do national and transnational conversations about poetry and race intersect and diverge? Representing a variety of specializations, distinguished poets and scholars including Lorna Goodison, the Poet Laureate of Jamaica, will compare insights into these and other questions.

 

"POETRY AND RACE"
Friday, October 5, 2018
Wilson Hall, Room 142
10am-5pm

 

Featured speakers include:
-J. Edward Chamberlin: http://www.english.utoronto.ca/facultystaff/emeritiretired/chamberlin.htm
-Lorna Goodison: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/lorna-goodison
-Tsitsi Jaji: https://english.duke.edu/people/tsitsi-ella-jaji
-Urayoán Noel: http://urayoannoel.com/
-Josephine Park: https://www.english.upenn.edu/people/josephine-park
-Evie Shockley: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/evie-shockley
-Nathan Suhr-Sytsma: http://www.english.emory.edu/home/people/faculty/faculty_pages/suhr_sytsma.html

 

For more information, go to http://poetryandpoetics.as.virginia.edu.

 

Please join us for the talks, discussion, and reception afterwards.

Alexa Joubin, “Can World Literature Go Beyond the Nation State? The Case of Global Shakespeare”

October 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:00 pm

Alexa Joubin, “Can World Literature Go Beyond the Nation State? The Case of Global Shakespeare”

October 1, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 3:00 pm
While postcolonial and world literature critics commonly privilege works that critique the role of Western hegemony, the meanings of Shakespeare in such places as South Africa, Brazil, and India are not always determined by colonial frames of reference. To further our understanding of Shakespeare in a post-national era, it is important to engage with hybrid cultural themes that inform many films and productions. Touring and intercultural Shakespeare thrive in a post-national space, particularly at international festivals in London, Craiova, Edinburgh, New York, Shanghai, Singapore, and other newly emerging and traditional metropolitan centers.
 
 

Contradictory myths are the foundation to many conversations about Shakespeare today. Supporting global performances are liberal political ideologies that work against bardolatry and yet condone other aspects of the Shakespeare myth.Two approaches are particularly conspicuous in the application of the global as a myth to Shakespearean performances: the construction of Shakespeare as a cosmopolitan brand and as an aggregate of overlapping localities—the notion that Shakespeare is everywhere in all localities. Site-specific epistemologies inform both approaches. In the process of myth making, multiple localities are brought together to create a deceivingly harmonious image of Shakespeare. The local is not always the antithesis to the global or an antidote to the hegemonic domination that has been stereotypically associated with the West. As such, Shakespearean myths are repositioned beyond national boundaries and traditionally understood colonial authority. 

"Cultural Constructicography": Daniel Shore (Georgetown U) Lecture, Workshop, and DH Mixer

September 27, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

"Cultural Constructicography": Daniel Shore (Georgetown U) Lecture, Workshop, and DH Mixer

September 27, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

"Cultural Constructicography," a discussion and workshop with Daniel Shore
Thursday, September 27, 2:30 - 4:30pm in Wilson 142
 

Workshop description: Come learn how digital archives and advanced search tools can help us revise our understanding of the history of language, the nature of the sign, and the "structure" of Structuralism. The session will begin with a short talk about the arguments of the recent book, Cyberformalism: Histories of Linguistic Forms in the Digital Archive, move to a demonstration of corpus-based research methods, and end with a workshop format where students can try out corpus methods on their own research topics and get coaching.
 

Bio: Daniel Shore, Provost's Distinguished Associate Professor of English at Georgetown University, is the author of Cyberformalism: Histories of Linguistic Forms in the Digital Archive (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018) and Milton and the Art of Rhetoric (Cambridge University Press, 2012), and of articles in journals including PMLA, Critical Inquiry, Modern Philology, Shakespeare Quarterly, Milton Studies and others. His research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, and he is the co-founder of the Six Degrees of Francis Bacon project.

Supriya Gandhi (Yale U), "A Tale of Two Translations: The Sirr-i akbar and its afterlives in South Asia"

September 20, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 pm

Supriya Gandhi (Yale U), "A Tale of Two Translations: The Sirr-i akbar and its afterlives in South Asia"

September 20, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 pm

In 1867, the Hindu reformist, Kanhaiya Lal Alakhdhari, completed an Urdu translation of fifty Upanishads. Alakhdhari, who later played a key role in establishing the Arya Samaj in the Punjab, expressed a concern that Hindus, unlike Muslims and Christians, were unfamiliar with their sacred texts. His translation was based on the Sirr-i akbar, an earlier Persian translation produced by the Mughal prince, Dara Shikoh, in 1657. Dara Shikoh argued that the Upanishads constituted a divinely revealed scripture, which held the key to the Quran’s mysteries. How did a seventeenth-century gesture of cross-cultural translation within an Islamic interpretive frame come to inform a sectarian Hindu project in the nineteenth-century? This talk examines these two moments of translation as a lens for exploring issues of scripture and language during the emergence of modern Hinduism. 

 

Supriya Gandhi works on the interface of Islam and Indic traditions in South Asia. She completed her doctorate at Harvard University, and has also studied in Delhi, Tehran, London and Damascus. She teaches in the department of Religious Studies at Yale University.

 

Digital Humanities Workshop with Giles Bergel (Oxford U) with DH@UVA

September 19, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Digital Humanities Workshop with Giles Bergel (Oxford U) with DH@UVA

September 19, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

"Computer Vision for DH," a workshop with Giles Bergel
Wednesday, September 19, 10am – 12pm in Wilson 142

 

Workshop description: Computer vision has made rapid progress in recent years. Computers can now reliably match the same image, find differences in similar images, and classify content within multiple images. Recently (and controversially) computers have also begun to be routinely used to identify people and places. This hands-on session will demonstrate how to install and use state-of-the-art open source software from the University of Oxford’s Visual Geometry Group<http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~vgg/>. Attendees will leave the session with knowledge of how to match, differentiate, classify, and annotate content within many kinds of images.
 

Requirements: a relatively recent laptop (not a tablet or phone), ideally one capable of running Docker<https://www.docker.com> (please install in advance). Online demos will be provided for those unable to install software. Demonstration data will be provided, but participants are encouraged to bring along (1) pairs of images exhibiting small differences, such as variant printings, restruck coins or altered photographs and (2) collections of images containing identical features, such as multiple images of buildings, duplicate photographs, or other printed images.

 

Bio: Giles Bergel<http://printing-machine.org> is a digital humanist and book historian based jointly in the Department of Engineering Sciences at the University of Oxford and the Department of Information Studies at University College London. He has been working on computer vision within the humanities since the creation of the Bodleian Library’s Broadside Ballads Online<http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk> resource in 2012, which implements a computer vision tool that is among several<http://www.robots.ox.ac.uk/~vgg/projects/seebibyte/software.html> that he now manages and supports. His other interests include bibliography, typography, and book design; the histories of copyright and media; text encoding; and digital library architecture.

Mellon Fellows Symposium | Samhita Sunya & Paul Dobryden

September 14, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium | Samhita Sunya & Paul Dobryden

September 14, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium

September 14

Wilson 142

 

 

 

10.30-11.30am

Samhita Sunya, Assistant Professor of Cinema, Department of Middle Easter & South Asian Languages & Cultures

"South by South/West Asia: Transregional Histories of Middle East/South Asia Cinemas"

 

11.30am-12.30pm

Paul Dobryden, Assistant Professor, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

"Hygiene on Screen: The Visual Rhetoric of Health in Weimar Cinema"

 

12.30-1.00pm - Lunch

 

Samhita Sunya completed her PhD at Rice University in 2014 and joined the American University of Beirut as an Assistant Professor of Visual Culture.  Her location in Lebanon for two years (2014 - 2016) complemented her earlier fieldwork at the National Film Archive of India, enabling her to further probe postwar circulation histories of Hindi film/songs across the Middle East.  Professor Sunya has been working on a manuscript titled Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema Via Bombay, which historicizes the emergence of “world cinema” as a category in the politics of the Cold War, and the manner in which Hindi film/songs negotiated this category.  Her interests span world film history; South / West Asian cinemas; intersections of audio-visual media and literature; and sound studies.  She also has a curatorial background in the collaborative administration of film series and festivals.  Professor Sunya teaches survey courses and specialized seminars in Middle East - South Asia film histories, in addition to Middle East - South Asia-focused thematic courses on topics such as cinephilia, adaptation, and genre; methods courses in areas such as film programming, sound studies, and film festival studies; among so many other possibilities that lie ahead! 

 

Paul Dobryden is Assistant Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures. 

"Humanities Informatics," CHCI Annual Conference

June 13, 2018

University of Virginia |

"Humanities Informatics," CHCI Annual Conference

June 13, 2018

University of Virginia |

2018 Annual Meeting
 

Humanities Informatics

Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia
June 13-17, 2018

 

Big data is now ubiquitous across myriad domains: politics, war, security, environment, health, media, art, culture and finance. New frontiers in information sciences have expanded our understanding of the human through advances in genetics and artificial intelligence (AI). Google and Facebook are at the forefront of research on AI. Historically linked to the rise of cybernetics in the 1950s, the penetration of big data and machine learning in our lives through advances in social media, cloud computing, robotics, epigenetics and cyber surveillance, have transformed our understanding of social belonging, political agency, knowledge production, privacy and autonomy.

 

Humanities Informatics is emerging as a new field in response to these developments. There are clear connections here to the work done in digital humanities, including the manipulation and visualization of data. But humanities informatics is less concerned with the actual computation of data than it is with the ways in which data structures and algorithms inform political economy, humanistic cultural production, human scientific endeavors, and studies of the evolution of human life itself.

 

Is new media technology making democratic politics impossible? What are the implications for the university of knowledge and information explosion unleashed by large corporations such as Google? How has social life been transformed by new media technologies? What transformations have emerged in art and performative cultures with the impact of interactive media technologies? Should we view the digital as a step-change in the technologies of communication and in epistemology? As the equivalent of the invention of the printing press? When algorithms make decisions, is there any room for discretion? How has our understanding of the ‘human’ been transformed by advances in genetic engineering and artificial intelligence?

 

A CHCI conference on Humanities Informatics will showcase the power of the humanities to address these urgent questions about the ‘human’ in our information age.

A special panel entitled, ‘#Charlottesville: August 11 & 12’ will focus on the eruption of neo-fascist violence in contemporary America. Charlottesville, the location of the conference, is also the site of neo-Nazi and white supremacist violence that shook the United States in the summer of 2017 and garnered global media attention. The panel will revisit the legacies of slavery, the civil war, the history of confederate monuments, and white supremacist movements in Virginia, a historic region that exists on the fault-line of a deep racial division that was foundational to the establishment of the United States as a nation. Speakers include Kirt Von Daacke, Chair of the UVA Presidential Commission on Slavery, and Deborah McDowell, Director, The Carter Woodson Institute of African and African-American Studies.

 

Visit the CHCI website for more information. 

Irrationality and the Contemporary

May 4, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am

Irrationality and the Contemporary

May 4, 2018

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am

 

"Irrationality & the Contemporary" is a one-day symposium, scheduled for Friday, May 4, 2018, in Wilson Hall 142. In light of the ongoing climate of skepticism and other signs of the retreat of liberalism around the world, our panels and keynote presentation will consider the play between rationality and irrationality in the post-1945 period and especially in our public discourse, bringing together scholars from diverse disciplines to reflect on forms of irrationality that appear in our politics, new media, the university, and neoliberal institutions. Professor Wendy Chun (Modern Culture and Media, Brown University) will deliver our keynote lecture. Cumulatively, the symposium strives to illuminate conditions constitutive of the contemporary moment, as well as historical forces that may be contributing to the incremental dissolution of infrastructures that support liberal democracy. 

 

This event is made possible by generous support from the Buckner W. Clay Endowment, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, New Literary History, the Department of Politics, the Department of English, and the Food, Fuels, and Forests Working Group.

 

Tentative Lineup:

Wendy Chun, Modern Culture and Media, Brown

Jonathan Flatley, English, Wayne State

Deborah Lawrence, Environmental Science, University of Virginia

Jennifer Fleissner, English, Indiana University

Bradley Pasanak, English, University of Virginia

Elizabeth Losh, English and American Studies, William & Mary

Lisa Friedman, Reporter, The New York Times

Austin Hetrick, English (PhD Candidate, event organizer), University of Virginia

Jap-Nanak Makkar, English (PhD Candidate, event organizer), University of Virginia

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