University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

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Mellon Fellows Seminar - Giulia Paoletti, "Decentralizing the Gaze: On the Origins of Photography in Senegal (1860-1910s)

April 17, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Giulia Paoletti, "Decentralizing the Gaze: On the Origins of Photography in Senegal (1860-1910s)

April 17, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Giulia Paoletti’s research examines nineteenth and twentieth century African art with a particular focus on the early histories of photography in West Africa. Based on two years of fieldwork, she is working on a book manuscript tracing the origins and early developments of photography in Senegal (1860-1960). The book is based on her dissertation that received the Arts Council of the African Studies Association’s 2017 Roy Sieber Award for Best Dissertation in African art (2013- 6). Besides Senegal, she did research in Mali, Nigeria, Benin, Cameroon and the Gambia where she has examined contemporary art practices.

Humanities Informatics - Symposium and Exhibition

April 3, 2020

TBD | TBD

Humanities Informatics - Symposium and Exhibition

April 3, 2020

TBD | TBD

Cristiana Facchini, "Questioning God: Jewish and Christian Theologies after Auschwitz"

April 1, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Cristiana Facchini, "Questioning God: Jewish and Christian Theologies after Auschwitz"

April 1, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | TBD

Cristiana Facchini is an Associate Professor at the University of Bologna and Fellow at the Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies of the University of Erfurt. She has studied in Bologna and specialized in Oxford and Jerusalem. She earned her PhD in Jewish Studies at University of Turin. She has been awarded many fellowship and grants, while pursuing her research in Paris, Budapest, New York and Berlin. She extensively wrote on history and theories of religions, with special regards both to Christianity and Judaism. In Bologna she has taught a wide range of courses, such as Theories of Religions, Comparative Religions, History of Judaism, Jewish Studies, Biblical Hebrew, Modern History, and  History of Western Christianity. In 2015 she was one of the keynote speakers of the XXI IAHR World Congress. In 2018 she received the Italian National Scientific Qualification (ASN) for Full Professor in Early Modern History (11/A2) and History of Christianity & Religious Studies (11/A4).

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Fotini Kondyli, "Citizen Participation and Urban Planning in Byzantine Athens"

March 20, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Fotini Kondyli, "Citizen Participation and Urban Planning in Byzantine Athens"

March 20, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Fotini Kondyli (Assistant Professor of Byzantine Art and Archaeology) is a Byzantine archaeologist who works on the Late Antique, Byzantine and Frankish periods. Her research interests include the construction of Byzantine spaces, communal identity, landscape and household archaeology and the archaeology of Byzantine non-elites. She also works on cultural, economic and political networks in the Eastern Mediterranean in the Late Byzantine period (13th- 15th c.). She is presently writing her first monograph on aspects of vulnerability and resilience of Late Byzantine rural societies, focusing on the spatial organization and socio-economic strategies of non-elite groups in response to economic and demographic crises. Her work brings together archaeology, archival research, spatial analysis, and the digital humanities.
 

Amitav Ghosh, Seminar & Workshop Series on "Indian Ocean and Climate Change"

March 16, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 |

Amitav Ghosh, Seminar & Workshop Series on "Indian Ocean and Climate Change"

March 16, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 |

The Indian Ocean in the Anthropocene

Seminar conveners: Amitav Ghosh and Debjani Ganguly

 

March 18 (Wed), 27(Fri)

April 2 (Thurs), 10 (Fri)

 

Hosted by the IHGC and the Mellon Global South Lab

 

Time/Venue: 3.00-5.00pm, Wilson 142

 

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Indian Ocean region, with its fast-accelerating economies, its innumerable oil and gas producers, its collapsing ecosystems, its vulnerable yet rapidly-increasing populations, and its swiftly-expanding carbon footprint, will be the theatre in which the future of the world will be decided. How will the ongoing changes affect the material and cultural lives of the region’s peoples, who are simultaneously drivers and victims of climate change? Many of the world’s major zones of conflict are already clustered around the Indian Ocean, and the region is also the theater of many accelerating arms races. How will these developments affect the global balance of power? What lessons might past climatic shifts offer for the future? These are some of the issues that will be discussed over the four two-hour sessions of this seminar. 

 

March 18: Indian Ocean Worlds and the Anthropocene  

March 27: The Little Ice Age in Tokugawa Japan and Mughal India: Early Modern Perspectives

April 2: The Arts of Living in a Precarious Age

April 10: Environmental Crisis and Security in the Indian Ocean

 

Visiting scholars Sunil Amrith (Harvard), Julia Adeney Thomas (Notre Dame) and Anand Pandian (Johns Hopkins) will participate in some of the sessions.

 

Approximately 3-4 readings will be assigned per session. The seminar will be capped at 25 participants, and readings will be circulated by the end of February to selected participants.  Please register here if you are interested. The call closes on February 24, 2020.

Deborah Baker, Seminar & Workshop on "Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism"

March 16, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 |

Deborah Baker, Seminar & Workshop on "Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism"

March 16, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 |

Spring Seminar with IHGC Distinguished Writer-in-Residence, Deborah Baker

 “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism”

 

March 16 (Mon), March 23 (Mon),

March 30 (Mon) and April 6 (Mon)

 

Time: 3.00-5.00pm

Venue: Wilson 142

(except for March 16 - Wilson 117)

 

We are living in a time of rising extremism and increasing polarization around the world.  This trend has been accompanied by acts of millenarian terror, generally committed by men who believe themselves and their identities and beliefs to be facing an existential threat.  What narrative strategies can be used to dramatize the conflict between those who want to destroy civil society, replacing civic norms with ones in which they are the unquestioned arbiters, and those who seek to protect the status quo? In this seminar we will look at works of fiction and narrative non-fiction that have captured this struggle in all its moral, political, and historical dimensions.

 

Reading list:

The Convert by Deborah Baker (narrative non-fiction)

One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway by Asne Sierstad  (narrative non-fiction)

American War by Omar el Akkad (futurist fiction)

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (speculative fiction)

Defying Hitler by Sebastien Haffner  (posthumous memoir)

  

The seminar will be capped at 20 participants, and the books will be provided to all, either as digital copies or in print, by the end of February 2020. The call will close on February 24.

  

Please register here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeTmkTo-rUiQnqu39exnL9O1-U-qM_S0u3QelZ1joJTrD2CVw/viewform

 

 

Bio: Deborah Baker was born in Charlottesville and grew up in Virginia, Puerto Rico and New England.  She attended the University of Virginia and the University of Cambridge.  Her first biography, written in college, was Making a Farm: The Life of Robert Bly, published by Beacon Press in 1982. After working a number of years as a book editor and publisher, in 1990 she moved to Calcutta where she wrote In Extremis; The Life of Laura Riding.  Published by Grove Press and Hamish Hamilton in the UK, it was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography in 1994.  Her third book, A Blue Hand: The Beats in India was published by Penguin Press USA and Penguin India in 2008. In 2008–2009 she was a Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis C. Cullman Center for Writers and Scholars at The New York Public Library.  There she researched and wrote The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, a narrative account of the life of an American convert to Islam, drawn on letters on deposit in the library’s manuscript division. The Convert, published by Graywolf and Penguin India, was a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award in Non-Fiction. In August 2018, Baker published her fifth work of non-fiction, The Last Englishmen: Love, War and the End of Empire. She has two children and is married to the writer Amitav Ghosh. They divide their time between Brooklyn and Goa.

CANCELLED: Sarah Nuttall, "Pluvial Time and the Novel Form"

March 16, 2020

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

CANCELLED: Sarah Nuttall, "Pluvial Time and the Novel Form"

March 16, 2020

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Sarah Nuttall is Professor of Literary and Image result for sarah nuttall"Cultural Studies and Director of WiSER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research) in Johannesburg, South Africa. She is the author of Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Postapartheid, editor of Beautiful/Ugly: African and Diaspora Aesthetics, and co-editor of many books including Negotiating the Past: The Making of Memory in South Africa; Senses of Culture; Johannesburg: The Elusive Metropolis and Loadshedding: Writing On and Over the Edge of South Africa. Recent essays include ‘Mandela’s Mortality’; ‘Secrecy’s Softwares’; ‘Surface, Depth and the Autobiographical Act’; ‘The Redistributed University’; and ‘The Earth as a Prison?’ She has given more than thirty keynote addresses around the world, and published more than sixty journal articles and book chapters. Her work is widely cited across many disciplines. She has taught at Yale and Duke Universities and in 2016 she was an Oppenheimer Fellow at the DuBois Institute at Harvard University. For seven years she has directed WiSER, the largest and most established Humanities Institute across the Global South.

Aswin Punathambekar, "Sound Art and Escape Routes to New Public Spheres"

February 28, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Aswin Punathambekar, "Sound Art and Escape Routes to New Public Spheres"

February 28, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Caroline Elkins, "The ‘Moral Effect’ of Legalized Lawlessness in the British Empire" (convened by Erik Linstrum)

February 27, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Caroline Elkins, "The ‘Moral Effect’ of Legalized Lawlessness in the British Empire" (convened by Erik Linstrum)

February 27, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Professor Elkins's first book,Caroline Elkins Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya, was awarded the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. It was also selected as one of the Economist's best history books for 2005, was a New York Times editor's choice, and was a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Award. She and her research were also the subjects of a 2002 BBC documentary titled, Kenya: White Terror, which was awarded the International Committee of the Red Cross Award at the Monte Carlos Film Festival. Professor Elkins is a contributor to The New York Times Book ReviewThe Atlantic, and The New Republic. She has also appeared on numerous radio and television programs including NPR's All Things Considered, BBC's The World, and PBS's Charlie Rose. Professor Elkins's current research interests include colonial violence and post-conflict reconciliation in Africa, and violence and the decline of the British Empire. She is currently working on two projects: one examining the effects of violence and amnesia on local communities and nation-building in post-independent Kenya; the other analyzing British counter-insurgency operations after the Second World War, with case studies including Palestine, Malaya, Kenya, Cyprus, and Nyasaland. Professor Elkins teaches courses on modern Africa, protest in East Africa, human rights in Africa, and British colonial violence in the 20th century.

Humanities Week 2020 | HistoREMIX

February 23, 2020

Humanities Week 2020 | HistoREMIX

February 23, 2020

HistoryREMIX is the theme of this year's Humanities Week, and undergraduate-led series of events sponsored by the IHGC. Visit the Humanities Week homepage for further details.

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Katelyn Hale Wood, "Listening Backwards: Archiving Laughter and Queer Sonic Intimacies"

February 7, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Katelyn Hale Wood, "Listening Backwards: Archiving Laughter and Queer Sonic Intimacies"

February 7, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Katelyn Hale Wood is a performance studies scholar and theatre historian whose research engages the intersections of critical race and queer theory, gender studies, and 20th/21st century comedic performance. Her first book project, tentatively titled Modalities of Freedom: Black Feminist Comedic Performance in 20th and 21st Century USA, argues how the work of Black feminist stand-up comedians have played vital roles in queer, feminist, and anti-racist community building. Her work has been published in Theatre Topics, QED: A Journal in GLTBQ Worldmaking, and Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, and has also been supported by the American Society for Theatre Research and the National Center for Institutional Diversity. 

Wood received her Ph.D. in Theatre History and Criticism with an emphasis in African American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin (2014). Prior to joining the faculty at UVA, she taught in the Theatre History and Theory program at Miami University. Alongside her scholarship, Wood is also a dramaturge. 

At UVA, Wood teaches courses in theatre history, performance theory, as well as interdisciplinary topics, such as race and performance in the Americas, queer and feminist performance in the U.S., and comedy as protest.

 

Information Session for 2020 Summer School of the Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory at the University of Bologna

February 7, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Information Session for 2020 Summer School of the Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory at the University of Bologna

February 7, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory at the University of Bologna

June 22 through July 3

A&S will fund program fees, airfare, lodging, and living expenses for a limited number of PhD students who are admitted to the 2020 Summer School of the Academy of Global Humanities and Critical Theory at the University of Bologna.  This year’s topic is Theory, Technology and the Political Imagination. Information for applicants is available at http://aghct.org/how-to-apply.  Applications must be submitted online by March 15th, 2020.  Applicants should indicate in their statements of purpose that they are applying for an institutional grant from the University of Virginia.  Applicants will be notified of selection results by April 6th

There is an information session on Feb. 7th in Wilson Hall 142 for students who wish to learn more about how to participate in this unique opportunity for intellectual and professional development.

Joan Wallach Scott, "Accounting for History: The Movements for Reparations for Slavery in the U.S."

January 30, 2020

The Dome Room, Rotunda | 4:00 PM

Joan Wallach Scott, "Accounting for History: The Movements for Reparations for Slavery in the U.S."

January 30, 2020

The Dome Room, Rotunda | 4:00 PM

Reviewing the long history of demands for reparations and looking closely at the current movements, Joan Scott will argue that although material compensation is certainly part of the effort, the demand for reparations is best understood as a critique of the conventional writing of American history.  It is an example of a critical politics that takes its aim at the way history represents the past.

 

Joan Scott is Professor Emerita in the School of Social Science in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ. Her groundbreaking work has challenged the foundations of conventional historical practice, including the nature of historical evidence and historical experience and the role of narrative in the writing of history. She is the author of numerous books that have been important for numerous disciplines and debates. These include Gender and the Politics of History (1988), Only Paradoxes to Offer: French Feminists and the Rights of Man (1996), Parité: Sexual Equality and the Crisis of French Universalism (2005), The Politics of the Veil (2007), The Fantasy of Feminist History (2011), Sex and Secularism (2017), and Knowledge, Power, and Academic Freedom (2018).

 

Prof. Scott’s visit is co-sponsored by the Institute for Humanities and Global Cultures, Political Theory: An International Journal of Political Philosophy, the Departments of Politics and of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, The Virginia Center for the Study of Religion, and the Power, Violence, and Inequality Collective.

Katherine Bode, "What's the Matter with Digital Literary Studies?"

January 22, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 5:30 pm - 7 pm

Katherine Bode, "What's the Matter with Digital Literary Studies?"

January 22, 2020

Wilson Hall 142 | 5:30 pm - 7 pm

Pluralizing Political Thought: Introducing The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Political Theory: Murad Idris, Leigh K. Jenco, and Megan C. Thomas in conversation with Ian Baucom, Roxanne L. Euben, and Lawrie Balfour

January 16, 2020

Harrison - Small Auditorium | 16:00

Pluralizing Political Thought: Introducing The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Political Theory: Murad Idris, Leigh K. Jenco, and Megan C. Thomas in conversation with Ian Baucom, Roxanne L. Euben, and Lawrie Balfour

January 16, 2020

Harrison - Small Auditorium | 16:00

On January 16, the Asian Cosmopolitanisms Lab are hosting 'Pluralizing Political Thought: Introducing The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Political Theory: Murad Idris, Leigh K. Jenco, and Megan C. Thomas in conversation with Ian Baucom, Roxanne L. Euben, and Lawrie Balfour' in the Harrison Small Auditorium. The event will take place at 4pm, and will be followed by a reception. 

David Nemer (UVA), "From Misinformation to Extremism: How WhatsApp Is Affording Radicalization in Brazil"

November 22, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

David Nemer (UVA), "From Misinformation to Extremism: How WhatsApp Is Affording Radicalization in Brazil"

November 22, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Talk description: During the 2018 Brazilian general election, WhatsApp became a potent tool for the spread of misinformation, especially for supporters of Bolsonaro. I began monitoring pro-Bolsonaro WhatsApp groups in March 2018- at the outset of the election, the social media app eventually helped Bolsonaro win and become the president of Brazil. I found that fake news spread in typical fashion, through a structure of groups that resembled a pyramid. Now, ten months into Bolsonaro’s presidency, WhatsApp is still serving as a largely hidden platform for the radicalization of right-wing Brazilians, even as Bolsonaro’s once-united base has splintered into separate, and often competing, factions. In this talk, I uncover hidden spaces of populism and misinformation on WhatsApp and detail the social infrastructure that is radicalizing the right in Brazil.

 
Bio: David Nemer is an Assistant Professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. His research and teaching interests cover the intersection of Science and Technology Studies (STS), ICT for Development (ICT4D), and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Nemer is an ethnographer whose fieldworks include the Slums of Vitória, Brazil; Havana, Cuba; Guadalajara, Mexico; and Eastern Kentucky, Appalachia. Nemer is the author of Favela Digital: The other side of technology (Editora GSA, 2013). He holds a Ph.D. in Computing, Culture, and Society from Indiana University and an M.Sc. in Computer Science from Saarland University. Nemer has written for The Guardian, El País, The Huffington Post (HuffPost), and The Intercept. 

 

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Ahmed al-Rahim, "Mobility and Knowledge in the Mongol Empire: The “Peripatetic School” (Madrasa-ye Sayyārā) of the Ilḫān Ūlǧāytū (r. 1304-16 A.D.)""

November 15, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Ahmed al-Rahim, "Mobility and Knowledge in the Mongol Empire: The “Peripatetic School” (Madrasa-ye Sayyārā) of the Ilḫān Ūlǧāytū (r. 1304-16 A.D.)""

November 15, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Ahmed H. al-Rahim works on Arabo-Islamic intellectual and religious history from Muhammad to Avicenna to Abū-Bakr al-Baghdādī. His research and teaching cut across the centuries, spanning the Arabic reception history of Avicennan philosophy during Islam’s so-called “dark ages,” from the eleventh to the fourteenth century, the development of Islamic ethics in the Middle Ages, and the ideologies of political Islam, also known as Islamism, in the Middle East in the early nineteenth to twenty-first century. Professor al-Rahim is currently working on a history of etiquette literature and manuals of practical virtue ethics (ādāb) in Islamicate civilization, and on a short introduction to modern Islamist ideologies. His publications include: Islamic Ethics: An Introduction to the Classical Tradition, New Islamic Surveys (Edinburgh University Press, Forthcoming); The Creation of Philosophical Tradition: Biography and the Reception of Avicenna’s Philosophy from the Eleventh to the Fourteenth Century A.D., Diskurse der Arabistik; XXI (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2018); and Before and After Avicenna: Proceedings of the First Conference of the Avicenna Study Group, co-edited with D.C. Reisman, Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science. Texts and Studies, LII (Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2003).

Crime, Security, and Citizenship: The Politics of Fingerprinting in China, 1920s - 1940s with Daniel Asen (Rutgers University)

November 15, 2019

Wilson 142 | 4:00PM - 5:30PM

Crime, Security, and Citizenship: The Politics of Fingerprinting in China, 1920s - 1940s with Daniel Asen (Rutgers University)

November 15, 2019

Wilson 142 | 4:00PM - 5:30PM

An event in the Asian Cosmopolitanisms Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Humanities Informatics' Surveillance and Infrastructure research group.

Modern practices of fingerprint identification were introduced into China during the first few decades of the 20th century and saw widespread use over the 1930s and 1940s, a period that saw the Nationalists’ brief unification of the country, the outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War, and a civil war between the Nationalists and Communists. While the earliest applications of modern fingerprinting had focused on the identification of repeat criminal offenders and forensic crime scene investigation, by the late 1940s the taking of fingerprints had become a much more common experience in urban China, one that was tied to the use of travel passes and identity documents during the Japanese occupation and, following the end of the Pacific War, a new regime of national identity documents implemented by the Nationalist government. This talk examines continuities and shifts in the techniques, applications, and politics of fingerprinting as it was utilized by local, national, and occupation regimes during these decades of political tumult and war.

Lucy Neave, "Environment Crisis, De-colonization and Signification in Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book

November 7, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Lucy Neave, "Environment Crisis, De-colonization and Signification in Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book

November 7, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book focuses on an Australian Aboriginal woman character named Oblivia, who emerges after a ten-year period of a trauma-induced ‘sleep’ in the ‘deep underground bowel of a giant eucalyptus tree’ where she writes ‘stanzas in ancient symbols’ (7). The setting of the novel is an imagined future of cataclysmic climate change, as well as an unresolved and ongoing settler past and present, in which First Nations people experience pervasive mental and affective colonization. Oblivia and other occupants of the polluted Northern Australian swamp where she lives, desire survival and connection with their ancestral lands.The novel’s narrative is inextricably bound up with images and texts pertaining to colonial pasts and also indigenous forms of storytelling. The swans who come to the swamp as refugees of climate change, exist as intertextual entities. This talk examines the extent to which the swans in the novel and Oblivia’s relationship with them dramatize questions around the ravages of settler colonialism and environmental crisis.

 

Biographical Note
Lucy Neave is conducting research for a book: Crisis, Kinship and the Animal in Twenty-First Century Literature (working title). She is the author of a series of papers on the representation of animals in contemporary literature, and a novel, Who We Were (Text Publishing, Melbourne, 2013), as well as short fiction. In spring 2019, she is a visiting scholar in the New York University department of English and Comparative Literature. She teaches creative writing and literary studies at the Australian National University.

Rotunda Planetarium: Public Symposium & Event

November 1, 2019

Rotunda Dome Room | 2:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Rotunda Planetarium: Public Symposium & Event

November 1, 2019

Rotunda Dome Room | 2:00 pm - 8:30 pm

 

Rotunda Planetarium Launch & Symposium
 

Announcing "Rotunda Planetarium: Science & Learning in the University of Virginia's First Library," a public symposium culminating in the unveiling of the Rotunda Planetarium sky map projection. The symposium will be held on Friday, 1 November, 2019 in the Rotunda's Dome Room from 2PM until 8:30PM. Dean and University Librarian John Unsworth will deliver opening remarks; Sara J. Schechner, David P. Wheatland Curator of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard, will give the keynote lecture at 6:30PM; and the launch of the sky map projection will follow at 7:30PM. Light snacks and beverages will be provided. Please feel free to circulate this announcement widely!

 

Registration preferred. To learn more or to register (optional), visit www.rotundaplanetarium.org/event/symposium/

 

Featured speakers include: Allison Bigelow, Max Edelson, Reed Gochberg, Ervin Jordan, Louis Nelson, Jalane Schmidt, Kirt von Daacke, & Richard Guy Wilson.

 

The first panel, "The Rotunda, Revisited," will begin at 2PM; the second panel, "Science & Learning in Early America," will follow at 3:45PM.

Virginia Film Festival: Middle Eastern & South Asian Sidebar

October 23, 2019

Various |

Virginia Film Festival: Middle Eastern & South Asian Sidebar

October 23, 2019

Various |

Link for viewing trailers, descriptions, and screening information, and for reserving tickets -https://virginiafilmfestival.org/filmcategory/middle-eastern-south-asian-sidebar/

 

The Contextual: A Rethinking of the Universal with Maria Heim (Amherst College)

October 14, 2019

Wilson 142 | 4:00PM - 6:00PM

The Contextual: A Rethinking of the Universal with Maria Heim (Amherst College)

October 14, 2019

Wilson 142 | 4:00PM - 6:00PM

An event in the Asian Cosmopolitanisms Lecture Series

A.K. Ramanujan’s classic essay, “Is there an Indian way of thinking?” contrasts what he says are the West’s universalist and classical India’s contextualist/particularist ways of thinking. Using this as a point of departure, I query the assumptions that inform this contrast: the universal and the particular can be read in alternative and dialectical ways such as in Pali Buddhist practices of treating textual contextualization as itself an expression of universalism. I do this by looking at the relationship between two conceptions, the Buddha’s omniscience and textual infinity.

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Njelle Hamilton, "The Time is Now: Ecocritical Futures and Creolized Time Travel in Rita Indiana's Tentacle"

October 11, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Njelle Hamilton, "The Time is Now: Ecocritical Futures and Creolized Time Travel in Rita Indiana's Tentacle"

October 11, 2019

Wilson Hall 142 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Njelle W. Hamilton is Assistant Professor in the departments of English and African-American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. She specializes in 20th and 21st century Caribbean literary and cultural studies, especially the impact of orality, music, and trauma on the Caribbean postcolonial novel. Her first monograph, Phonographic Memories: Popular Music and the Contemporary Caribbean Novel (Rutgers, 2019), investigates how Caribbean subjects turn to nation music when personal and cultural memory have been impacted by time, travel, or trauma. Her current project, tentatively titled Caribbean Chronotropes: The Politics, Physics, and Poetics of Time in Contemporary Fiction, reads recent time-bending novels through the lens of physics, phenomenology, and Caribbean theory. She serves on the editorial board of Caribbean in Transit: An Arts Journal, and her essays on sound studies and trauma theory have appeared in Anthurium, Journal of West Indian Literature, Critical Perspectives on Indo-Caribbean Women’s Literature, Wasafiri, and SX Salon. 

 

Jane Taylor, IHGC Distinguished Visitor Public Lecture, "Newes from the Dead"

October 4, 2019

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Jane Taylor, IHGC Distinguished Visitor Public Lecture, "Newes from the Dead"

October 4, 2019

Bryan Hall Faculty Lounge | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

IHGC Distinguished Visitor Public Lecture

 

 

Jane Taylor

Andrew W Mellon Chair of Aesthetic Theory and Material Performance

University of Western Cape

 

 

October 4

4.00-5.30pm

 

Faculty Lounge

Bryan Hall

 

 

“Newes from the Dead”

 

Abstract: An unnatural “Moment in the History of Natural Philosophy.” In 1650, a young woman was hanged in Oxford, England, for infanticide, and her body was given to the anatomists at the University for an anatomy lesson which was also a lesson in law, power, and patriarchy. This paper explores the remarkable circumstances surrounding her death. In 2011, following a commission from Renaissance scholar Stephen Greenblatt, Professor Taylor staged a theater work arising from this moment of history, in order to conceptualize, through performance, the relation between natural history, puppetry arts and the materiality of being. Professor Taylor’s talk will be based on her experience of this theatrical collaboration and larger questions about the history of biomedical sciences and changing attitudes to life, mortality, the infant and discourses on the woman’s body.

 

 

Bio: Professor Jane Taylor is Andrew W Mellon Chair of Aesthetic Theory and Material Performance at the University of Western Cape, South Africa. She has held numerous visiting positions at Harvard, Chicago, Cambridge, Leeds and elsewhere. A distinguished playwright, creative writer and scholar of performance theory, Professor Taylor leads several interdisciplinary projects on shifting conceptions of the human - biomedical, informatic, and geological - under conditions of late modernity. She engages with arts practitioners across visual representation and performance, activating a consideration of the ways in which the aesthetic defines and delimits the conditions of human existence. She has written several plays for puppets, working with artist William Kentridge and the Handspring Puppet Company, as well as a recent puppet play for Renaissance scholar Stephen Greenblatt – a work dealing with the early history of neurology. She has written a novel, The Transplant Men (2009), based on the life of Dr Christiaan Barnard, who performed the world’s first heart transplant surgery. She has recently published a monograph on William Kentridge’s production of The Nose, for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This study explores subject/object relations as well as aesthetic experiments associated with Soviet Constructionism. While at UVA, Professor Taylor will collaborate on a new IHGC Mellon Lab on Performance Cultures in the Global South.

Cinema, Architecture, Art: A Festival of Documentaries from India @ UVA

October 2, 2019

Various | 6:00 PM

Cinema, Architecture, Art: A Festival of Documentaries from India @ UVA

October 2, 2019

Various | 6:00 PM

 

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