University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

News

“Coasts in Crisis:” A Digital Exhibit of Art After Hurricanes Virtual Launch

November 12, 2021

“Coasts in Crisis:” A Digital Exhibit of Art After Hurricanes Virtual Launch

November 12, 2021

Kasey Jernigan, Workshop on Digital Storytelling & Indigenous Cultures

November 12, 2021

Kasey Jernigan, Workshop on Digital Storytelling & Indigenous Cultures

November 12, 2021

Book Seminar on South Asian Politics, History, and Culture (Featuring Prathama Banerjee & Rochona Majumdar

November 11, 2021

Book Seminar on South Asian Politics, History, and Culture (Featuring Prathama Banerjee & Rochona Majumdar

November 11, 2021

The seminar will feature talks and a discussion on two recent publications on South Asian political thought, history, and culture by the featured authors.

 

 

Prathama Banerjee, Elementary Aspects of the Political: Histories from the Global South

Duke University Press, 2020

https://www.dukeupress.edu/elementary-aspects-of-the-political

 

In Elementary Aspects of the Political Prathama Banerjee moves beyond postcolonial and decolonial critiques of European political philosophy to rethink modern conceptions of "the political" from the perspective of the global South. Drawing on Indian and Bengali practices and philosophies from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Banerjee identifies four elements of the political: the self, action, the idea, and the people. She examines selfhood in the light of precolonial Indic traditions of renunciation and realpolitik; action in the constitutive tension between traditional conceptions of karma and modern ideas of labor; the idea of equality as it emerges in the dialectic between spirituality and economics; and people in the friction between the structure of the political party and the atmospherics of fiction and theater. Banerjee reasserts the historical specificity of political thought and challenges modern assumptions about the universality, primacy, and self-evidence of the political

 

 

Rochona Majumdar, Art Cinema and India’s Forgotten Futures, Columbia University Press, 2021

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/art-cinema-and-indias-forgotten-futures/9780231201056

 

In this pioneering book, Rochona Majumdar examines key works of Indian art cinema to demonstrate how film emerged as a mode of doing history and that, in so doing, it anticipated some of the most influential insights of postcolonial thought. Majumdar details how filmmakers as well as a host of film societies and publications sought to foster a new cinematic culture for the new nation, fueled by enthusiasm for a future of progress and development. Good films would help make good citizens: art cinema would not only earn global prestige but also shape discerning individuals capable of exercising aesthetic and political judgment. During the 1960s, however, Satyajit Ray, Mrinal Sen, and Ritwik Ghatak—the leading figures of Indian art cinema—became disillusioned with the belief that film was integral to national development. Instead, Majumdar contends, their works captured the unresolvable contradictions of the postcolonial present, which pointed toward possible, yet unrealized futures.

 

Prathama Banerjee is Professor at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi, India, and author of Politics of Time: "Primitives" and History-Writing in a Colonial Society (2006) and Elementary Aspects of the Political: Histories from the Global South (2020).

 

Rochona Majumdar is Associate Professor in the Departments of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, and Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Marriage and Modernity: Family Values in Colonial Bengal (2009), Writing Postcolonial History (2010), and Art Cinema and India’s Forgotten Futures (2021).

 

Aswin Punathambekar is Associate Professor in the Department of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. He is the author of From Bombay to Bollywood: The Making of a Global Media Industry (2013), co-author of Media Industry Studies (2020), and co-editor of Global Bollywood (2008), Television at Large in South Asia (2013), and Global Digital Cultures: Perspectives from South Asia (2019). 

 

Samhita Sunya is Assistant Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Sirens of Modernity: World Cinema Via Bombay (in press,). Her interests span world film history, informal practices of media distribution across South / West Asia and the Indian Ocean, and intersections of audio-visual media and literary forms.

Ed Welch (University of Aberdeen), “Spatial Planning's Time Machine: Spaces of Speed in a Modernized France”

November 5, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am

Ed Welch (University of Aberdeen), “Spatial Planning's Time Machine: Spaces of Speed in a Modernized France”

November 5, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am

Spatial Planning's Time Machine: Spaces of Speed in a Modernized France

Edward Welch, University of Aberdeen

Register here

 

 

During the presidency of Charles de Gaulle (1958-1969), France’s look and feel began to be transformed by an extensive programme of spatial planning and modernization (aménagement du territoire). Unfolding over the subsequent decades, aménagement du territoire produced New Towns, holiday resorts, motorways, airports, rapid rail networks and other forms of infrastructure. Yet while modernized space was the most obvious outcome of their work, France’s aménageurs were perhaps even more preoccupied with time. More specifically, they were obsessed with the future. Even, on occasion, they gave the impression that planning was somehow from the future.

 

Writing in 1965, Oliver Guichard, director of the newly created DATAR spatial planning agency, suggested that ‘l’aménagement ne vit pas dans l’époque présent: il doit toujours la devancer, projeter sur l’avenir’ [spatial planning doesn’t live in the present: it must always be one step ahead, projecting into the future]. Being ahead of its time, planning’s job was to return to the present with insights from the future, and use them to propel the country towards its destiny. Guichard’s comment comes in his book Aménager la France, and is a moment of time-travelling brio in an otherwise relatively sober account of the aims and requirements of French spatial planning. It is also a glimpse of some of the more striking philosophies of time and history lurking beneath the planners’ administrative and technical discourse. In particular, it betrays the influence of the philosopher Gaston Berger, whose notion of la prospective as anticipatory thinking would guide their work during the 1960s and early 1970s.

 

This paper explores how France’s post-war spatial planners think about and negotiate time, and the complexities which emerge as they do so. At stake is their understanding of time, speed and acceleration, as well as the sorts of spaces they create, and how those spaces transform the lived experience of time. One of the key aims of aménagement was to improve circulation, mobility and productivity by means of infrastructure. Spatial planning thus became a form of machine designed to shrink the French hexagon by engineering time-space compression, and an example of how technocratic states sustained the ‘dromocratic revolution’ diagnosed by Paul Virilio (1977) as the driving force of western civilization. One of its most notable and visible outcomes was the development of France’s system of motorways (autoroutes). In order to think about the nature and consequences of modernized France’s infrastructure spaces, the paper explores the presence of motorways in some French texts and films, including Julio Cortázar and Carol Dunlop’s Les Autonautes de la cosmoroute (1983) and Agnès Varda’s Sans toit ni loi (1985), considering how they at once depict and interrogate the peculiar temporalities and modes of being motorways bring with them.

 

 

Biography

Edward Welch is Carnegie Professor of French at the University of Aberdeen. His research explores modernization, space, and change in post-war France, and their representation in literary and visual culture. Publications include France in Flux: Space, Territory and Contemporary Culture, co-edited with Ari Blatt (Liverpool University Press, 2019); Contesting Views: The Visual Economy of France and Algeria, co-authored with Joseph McGonagle (Liverpool University Press, 2013); and François Mauriac: The Making of an Intellectual (Rodopi, 2006). He is currently completing a book on spatial planning and modernization, provisionally entitled Making Space in Post-war France.

Professor China Scherz Manuscript Workshop

October 22, 2021

Wilson Hall 142 |

Professor China Scherz Manuscript Workshop

October 22, 2021

Wilson Hall 142 |

Empires in Global Context: A Symposium

October 15, 2021

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am - 6:30 pm

Empires in Global Context: A Symposium

October 15, 2021

Wilson Hall 142 | 9:00 am - 6:30 pm

Empires in Global Context”

A One-Day Workshop, sponsored by the Institute for the Humanities and Global Cultures

Co-organizers: Krishan Kumar (Sociology)  and Ted Lendon (History)

Friday, October 15, 2021, 9:00 am to 6:30 pm.  Room: Wilson 142

 

Program

(All participants from UVA except where shown)

9:00-9:15. Introduction to the workshop.

9:15-10:45. The Roman Empire in Global Context. Peter Fibiger Bang (University of Copenhagen, History)

                        Discussant: Ted Lendon (History)

10:45-11:00 Coffee Break

11:00-12:30. The French Empire in Global Context. Laurent Dubois (History)

Discussant: Marlene Daut (African-American and African Studies)

12:30-1:30 Lunch

1:30-2:45 The Ottoman Empire in Global Context. Dimitri Kastritsis (University of St. Andrews, History).      Discussant: Amanda Phillips (Art History)/Joshua White (History)

2:45-4:15 The British Empire in Global Context. Paul Halliday (History)

                        Discussant: Krishan Kumar (Sociology)

4:15-4:30 Tea Break

4:30-5:45 The Chinese Empire in Global Context. Ellen Zhang (History).

                        Discussant: Xiaoyuan Liu (History)

5:45-6:30 Concluding Discussion

Coastal Futures Festival Symposium

October 15, 2021

Webinar | 8:00 PM

Coastal Futures Festival Symposium

October 15, 2021

Webinar | 8:00 PM

The Coastal Futures Conservatory at the University of Virginia presents a symposium on sonification and expression of data and dreams, mediating and meditating upon coastal futures.

 

Friday, October 15, 2021, 8pm Eastern US Time (EDT)

The symposium is on line and open to the public.

https://virginia.zoom.us/j/91896921556?pwd=VkRrQzlEcXovdEd2M3ZGVnNURnNSZz09

Meeting ID: 918 9692 1556

Passcode: 152452

 

The Coastal Futures Conservatory at the University of Virginia presents a symposium featuring Chris Chafe & Greg Niemeyer, Joyce To & Louis Pena, Jeremy Muller, and the EcoSono Ensemble. The symposium will center around issues of coastal futures at play in The Metered Tide, a work by Chris Chafe and Greg Niemeyer using sonification of the California Coast. Chafe and Niemeyer will discuss sonification and their collaborative work on sea level rise, and EcoSono Ensemble will perform a new version of the piece. 

 

In addition, Joyce To and Louis Pena from Australia will perform Chorale, a piece based on coral reef data. We will welcome reflections from a team of scholars who will have just completed a three-day field residency at the VCR. 

 

The symposium will begin and end with movements from Matthew Burtner’s Glisten of Places, a contemplative piece for sonified, geotagged sites and field recordings performed by percussionist, Jeremy Muller.

Sharing and Planning Gathering on Practice-Based/Practice-Led Research in Arts, Culture, and Performance

October 8, 2021

Morven Farm |

Sharing and Planning Gathering on Practice-Based/Practice-Led Research in Arts, Culture, and Performance

October 8, 2021

Morven Farm |

Stealing time: photographs and the long inception of colonialism in southern Angola - Webinar led by Patricia Hayes

September 23, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 - 1:30pm

Stealing time: photographs and the long inception of colonialism in southern Angola - Webinar led by Patricia Hayes

September 23, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 - 1:30pm

Register Here

‘Stealing Time’ is an attempt to put the teleologies of colonization and progress on hold, to use the space-time compressions of photographs to pause and search for something else. It probes whether new modes of reading photographs might be able to connect us in unexpectedly rich ways with Africa’s more distant past. It explores the interpenetration of ‘sources’ and the durability of things surfacing in photographs that come from more remote histories. Periods of early encounter and the initiation of colonial rule are obviously dense in this regard but tend to be treated as overwhelmingly colonial and going in a certain temporal direction, inevitably foreclosing other eras. The either/or terminology of historical periodization (precolonial/colonial) confines us to a linear conception of time that shuts down other possibilities.

 

This lecture will concentrate on two separate photographic images from the Cuvelai floodplain located in what is now southern Angola and northern Namibia. In the early twentieth century it was a contested region between Portugal, Germany, several sizeable African kingdoms and later during World War 1, South Africa. The first photograph originates from an album of the Portuguese officer Velloso de Castro who participated in the 1907 military campaign against Cuamato. The second photograph is one of several group portraits emanating from the first official South African tour to Ovamboland in 1915 led by Major Pritchard. Both these images operate as a kind of prism to think about what might have converged in these spaces at that time, and the possible genealogies behind them. Given the ‘micro-levels at which we encounter the past’ through photographs, as well as the foreshortening of history that occurs by not taking ‘the precolonial’ seriously, can such photos help us to think about time differently and expand our spatial sense of Africa’s deeper pasts?  


Patricia Hayes is currently the NRF SARChI Chair in Visual History & Theory at the Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape. Her research background is in African history, and she engages extensively with photographic archives and their methodological challenges to bring together history and aesthetics. She is co-editor of the volume Ambivalent. Photography and Visibility in African History (2019), and the special issue on ‘Other Lives of the Image’ of the journal Kronos (2020).

 

“Immunity and Quarantine: The Biopolitics of Space-Making in Pandemics” - Lucerne-UVA-WISER Seminar

September 9, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

“Immunity and Quarantine: The Biopolitics of Space-Making in Pandemics” - Lucerne-UVA-WISER Seminar

September 9, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Immunity and Quarantine: The Biopolitics of Space-Making in Pandemics

 

Hosted by the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, University of Virginia &

Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Witwatersrand

Thursday 9 September, 16.00-18.00 (10.00-12.00 US Eastern Time)

 

 

“Immunity”, whether referring to the individual (the official, the diplomat, the patient, the police officer, the doctor) or to the group (civil officers, the police, pharmaceutical companies, the “herd,” or the population) has shuttled among the registers of language that are held responsible for human and social life. Used in law, medicine, politics, religion and philosophy, the idea of immunity underpins that which constitutes the human and its relation to the non-human, disease, impurity, danger, and spatial containment. If natural immunity is the ability to resist infection, legal immunity is the granting of an exemption by a higher authority.  In the case of ecclesiastical immunity, immunity is an exception from secular or civil duties. The afterlife of this ecclesiastical model can be found, for example, in the notion of qualified immunity given to police officers in the US who have murdered African Americans. Immunity as a category has gone hand in hand with the idea of quarantine: the enclosure of peoples and places to protect the larger population from contamination of various kinds - epidemiological, ideological, cultural, psychic, and moral. Together, immunity and quarantine have been mutually constitutive in the spheres they have shaped and curtailed.  In this seminar, we will explore their interplay both in the context of the differential spatial logics of the Covid-19 pandemic and the cultural and political ramifications of the AIDS epidemic. Theories on vaccines and immunity, biopolitical thought, critical race theory, as well as cultural products such as literary works and art projects will feature in the presentations.

 

 

Professor Sarah Nuttall, Director, WISER, University of the Witwatersrand, will introduce the topic and moderate the seminar.

 

Professor Ranjana Khanna, Director, Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University, will offer an intellectual history of immunity ranging from ancient legal regimes like the Roman to the rise of queer theory during the AIDS era. She will also draw on critical race theory (a product of legal scholarship) to reflect on the limits of qualified immunity that offers protection to law enforcement authorities in dealing with racial violence.

 

Professor Debjani Ganguly, Director, Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, University of Virginia will explore the interplay of immunity and autoimmunity in a biopolitical regime marked by complex systems, the emergence of risk discourse, and theories of probability. Her talk will engage with the works of Michel Foucault, Roberto Esposito, and Ulrich Beck, and offer insights into speculative fictional modes on pandemics.

"The Cambridge History of World Literature" Launch Event w/ Debjani Ganguly, Francesca Orsini, Jahan Ramazani, and B. Venkat Mani

May 27, 2021

Webinar | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

"The Cambridge History of World Literature" Launch Event w/ Debjani Ganguly, Francesca Orsini, Jahan Ramazani, and B. Venkat Mani

May 27, 2021

Webinar | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

On May 27th @ 4-5 pm BST and 11-12 pm EST, Please join us for a virtual launch event for the forthcoming The Cambridge History of World Literature, edited by Debjani Ganguly. Debjani Ganguly will be on a panel alongside Francesca OrsiniJahan Ramazani, and B. Venkat Mani

 

Debjani Ganguly is Professor of English and Director of the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures at the University of Virginia. She works in the fields of world literature, postcolonial studies and South Asian studies. Her research interests include novel studies, theories of world literature, global Anglophone literatures, technologies of war and violence, literature and human rights, planetary humanities, caste and dalit studies, and Indian Ocean literary worlds.

Francesca Orsini is a literary historian at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies working primarily with Hindi and Urdu materials and interested in exploring how multilingualism worked and continues to work within the literary cultures of South Asia. 

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is the author of a number of books of criticism on poetry, including Poetry in a Global Age (2020) and Poetry and Its Others: News, Prayer, Song, and the Dialogue of Genres (2013).

B. Venkat Mani is Professor of German at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is also affiliated with the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture and the Institute for Regional and International Studies.

 

Register here

Rethinking World Literature: China as Method - "Recovering First Patients: De-anglophonizing the Pandemic Archive on SARS”

May 14, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Rethinking World Literature: China as Method - "Recovering First Patients: De-anglophonizing the Pandemic Archive on SARS”

May 14, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Belinda Kong, Associate Professor, Bowdoin College
"Recovering First Patients: De-anglophonizing the Pandemic Archive on SARS”

 

As the first global pandemic of the 21st century, the 2003 SARS outbreak was as an uncanny precursor to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Who were its first patients, how were they narrated by the anglophone media, and what alternative archives can we look to to reconstruct their stories? Focusing on three SARS index cases—the first patients in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore—this talk examines anglophone formations of sinophobic racism and bioorientalism as they intersect with contemporary global discourses of infectious disease crisis. 
 
Belinda Kong is John F. and Dorothy H. Magee Associate Professor of Asian Studies and English at Bowdoin College. She is author of Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square: The Chinese Literary Diaspora and the Politics of Global Culture (Temple University Press 2012) and is working on a new book project, What Lived Through SARS: Chronicles of Pandemic Resilience, which examines global pandemic discourses around the 2003 SARS epidemic, with focus on everyday cultures of epidemic life that emerged from the outbreak’s epicenters in China and Hong Kong. 

 

Register in advance for this meeting

Trans-National Ties: Formation Between the Episcopal Mission of Hankow and the Chinese Bible Church of Greater Boston (w/ Natasha Heller & Emily Yen)

May 4, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 pm

Trans-National Ties: Formation Between the Episcopal Mission of Hankow and the Chinese Bible Church of Greater Boston (w/ Natasha Heller & Emily Yen)

May 4, 2021

Webinar | 12:00 pm

While there is extensive scholarship on protestant missions in China prior to 1950 and the emergence of Chinese American protestant churches in the United States during the second half of the 20th Century, there is a limited understanding of the mechanisms that allowed the former to shape the growth of the latter.  There is little empirical research on the relationships between the recalled missionaries in China and the Chinese student migrants fleeing to the United States during the McCarthy Era. This case study traces how the social ties formed between a missionary and congregants at the Episcopal Mission of Hankow shaped the emergence of the Chinese Bible Church of Greater Boston.  These pre-migration ties significantly shaped the Chinese Christian community in Boston and complicate our understanding of the mechanisms facilitating Boston’s Quiet Revival and Chinese American church planting.  More broadly, this case study provides insight into how recalled missionaries can shape immigrant communities.

 

Register here

 

Natasha Heller studies Chinese Buddhism in the context of cultural and intellectual history. Her research includes both the pre-modern period (10th through 14th c.) and the contemporary era. Heller's study of an eminent monk of the Yuan dynasty, Illusory Abiding: The Cultural Construction of the Chan Monk Zhongfeng Mingben, was published by Harvard University Asia Center in 2014.  This monograph examines Mingben’s use of poetry, calligraphy, and gong’an commentary in the context of his distinctive Chan (Zen) teachings. Heller’s current book project concerns picture books published by Buddhist organizations in Taiwan, and how such children’s fiction not only teaches young people about the Buddhist tradition, but also addresses how to relate to clergy, family members, and society. She has published in journals such as History of Religions, the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, and Material Religion.

 

Emily H. A. Yen is a Visiting Faculty Scholar at the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures at the University of Virginia. She earned a doctorate in Sociology at UCLA and was Kelter Postdoctoral Fellow in Urban Studies at Trinity College.

East Asian Cultural Responses to the Covid-19 Pandemic

April 26, 2021

Webinar | 7:00 pm

East Asian Cultural Responses to the Covid-19 Pandemic

April 26, 2021

Webinar | 7:00 pm

While policy and strategy decisions have dominated mainstream media coverage of other nations’ handling of the Covid-19 pandemic, it is also important to consider how at the level of everyday life, societies and individuals have been experiencing the upheavals caused by the pandemic. This panel thus focuses on East Asian cultural reactions to this worldwide crisis. 

 

Jaeho Kang (Seoul National University) will describe how South Korean responses to the pandemic have been shaped by a confluence of technological and traditional cultural factors, and are interpreted along these rubrics. Chenshu Zhou (University of Pennsylvania) will be examining online video representations of Wuhan under lockdown that make use of drone footage. Anri Yasuda (University of Virginia) will analyze how works of Japanese literature written during the pandemic underscore a pervasive 'crisis ordinary' mentality that precedes Covid-19. After the presentations, there will be time for dialogue and exchanges about the shared themes, as well as the marked differences, amongst the contemporary East Asian socio-cultural contexts under discussion. 

 

Registration link forthcoming

Humanities Week 2021: Normalcy in Arts and Theatre - Broadway Talks Back with Alice Ripley

April 23, 2021

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Humanities Week 2021: Normalcy in Arts and Theatre - Broadway Talks Back with Alice Ripley

April 23, 2021

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Join Tony award winning actress Alice Ripley as she discusses her experience in the hit Broadway show Next to Normal and normalcy in the theatre.

 

Zoom link TBD

Teaching the 'Long' 18th Century

April 23, 2021

Webinar | 9:00 am - 11:00 am

Teaching the 'Long' 18th Century

April 23, 2021

Webinar | 9:00 am - 11:00 am

After Thomas Baldwin, A Balloon-Prospect from above the Clouds, 

plate from Thomas Baldwin, Airopaidia (London; Chester: Printed for the author, 1786), 154.

 

Friday, April 23, 2021

9-11 am EDT

Register Here

 

"Teaching the ‘Long’ 18th Century"

Organized by Sarah Betzer, University of Virginia,

and Dipti Khera, Art History and Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

 

Roundtable featuring:

Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Princeton University

Nebahat Avcıoğlu, Hunter College, City University of New York

Emma Barker, The Open University, London

Ananda Cohen-Aponte, Cornell University

Prita Meier, Art History and Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

Nancy Um, Binghamton University, State University of New York

Stephen Whiteman, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

 

 

This roundtable brings together scholars from a broad array of geographical foci and institutional perspectives who have been at the forefront of efforts to rethink approaches to thinking, researching, and, crucially, teaching the art and material culture of an interconnected “long” eighteenth century. Convened in conjunction with a session at the 2021 College Art Association conference, the roundtable will appear in distilled form in a dedicated issue of Journal18, forthcoming in Fall 2021. Two key aims animate the roundtable and its afterlife in Journal18: 1) to reflect upon teaching the “long" eighteenth century, particularly in light of renewed debates on the reparation of objects, revision of histories, and inclusion of colonized and enslaved voices in museums, plantation sites, and public squares; and 2) to compile a list of resources and open-access supporting materials that are pragmatically useful for colleagues engaged in teaching the “long” and “broad” eighteenth century.

 

 

Humanities Week 2021: UVA Sustainability

April 22, 2021

Humanities Week 2021: UVA Sustainability

April 22, 2021

Join Humanities Week as we partner with UVA Sustainability on Earth Day to explore normalcy in the environment.

Watershed Clean-Up
1-3PM // Meadow Creek and Pollock's Branch​

Join The Nature Conservancy and Charlottesville Parks for an Earth Day Celebration! You will be helping to clean up the watershed around Meadow Creek and Pollock's Branch to prevent plastic pollution from reaching the Chesapeake Bay. Volunteers must read and sign our COVID field guidelines and health screening questions. Guidelines include having a mask readily accessible if working less than 6' apart, bringing hand sanitizer and confirming you have health insurance. Email caitlin.embly@tnc.org for more information.

 

Leave No Trace Awareness Workshop
6-7PM // Zoom

Learn the 7 principles of Leave No Trace during this Awareness Workshop! Participants will learn how to hike, camp, and explore outside in a way that leaves a minimal impact. We will also touch on the upcoming City Nature Challenge and how to participate while leaving no trace.

Zoom registration link

 

SUN SiNG in Place Earth Day Concert
7-8PM // Livestreamed on Vimeo, Youtube, and Facebook

Join ARTivism Virginia and the SUN SiNG Collective for #EarthDay2021 at 7:00PM Eastern for one hour of music, spoken word, and action opportunities as we stay connected in resistance to new fossil fuel infrastructure, united in our fights for environmental justice, and together in solidarity for a livable future! Streaming live on:

Vimeo: https://www.vimeo.com/artivismvirginia 
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/artivismvirginia 
And Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/artivismvirginia

 

The Subjectivity of the Translator

April 21, 2021

Webinar | 7:00 pm

The Subjectivity of the Translator

April 21, 2021

Webinar | 7:00 pm

Jeremy Tiang discusses the process of translating the late Yeng Pway Ngon's Unrest, and what it means to be a Singaporean Chinese translator working within his own community and culture. What happens to the metaphor of translation as a 'bridge' when both ends of the bridge are located in the same place? Can the translator truly be neutral, or should we pay more attention to who is doing the translating?

 

Jeremy Tiang is a novelist, playwright and translator from Chinese. His translations include novels by Yeng Pway Ngon, Su Wei-Chen, Yan Ge, Zhang Yueran, Lo Yi-Chin, Chan Ho-Kei and Li Er. His plays include Salesman之死A Dream of Red Pavilions, and translations of scripts by Chen Si’an, Wei Yu-Chia, Quah Sy Ren and others. His novel State of Emergency won the Singapore Literature Prize in 2018. He lives in Flushing, Queens, and is a member of the translation collective Cedilla & Co.

 

Register here

Humanities Week 2021: PechaKucha Presentation Night

April 21, 2021

Webinar | 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Humanities Week 2021: PechaKucha Presentation Night

April 21, 2021

Webinar | 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Join Humanities Week in our inaugural PechaKucha night! PechaKucha (Japanese for “chit chat”) is the world’s fastest-growing storytelling platform, used by millions around the globe. Watch a selection of PechaKucha presentations by UVA students for an evening of engaging and informational fun.

Prizes available for submissions! Submit your own PechaKucha video below for a chance to win!
 

Submission link

Good Neighbors? Charlottesville & UVA: Webinar feat. Davarian Baldwin, Ang Conn, & Laura Goldblatt

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 4:00 pm

Good Neighbors? Charlottesville & UVA: Webinar feat. Davarian Baldwin, Ang Conn, & Laura Goldblatt

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 4:00 pm

Next: Good Neighbors? Charlottesville & UVA
Webinar feat. Davarian Baldwin, Ang Conn, & Laura Goldblatt
April 20th, 4:00-5:15 pm
Register here

 

In cities across America—including here in Charlottesville—universities have become a dominant social and economic presence: gentrifying neighborhoods, maintaining large police forces, and becoming primary employers. “University life,” it could be said, increasingly happens at the expense of the cities which surround them. What is a university’s obligation to the city in which it resides? What actions can we take to imagine a new, equitable vision of university life? Join us for a webinar conversation with Davarian Baldwin (Trinity College) and Ang Conn (organizer), moderated by Laura Goldblatt (UVA), about how we might address UVA’s relationship to Charlottesville. Davarian Baldwin will discuss his findings from his recent book, In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower, and Ang Conn will address the local situation in Charlottesville. 

 

Note: Live transcription will be available. Please email any additional access needs to jaw2yc@virginia.edu

Music and Mimesis: A Roundtable Discussion

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 9:30 am - 11:30 am

Music and Mimesis: A Roundtable Discussion

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 9:30 am - 11:30 am

Music and Mimesis: A Roundtable Discussion 

Register here

 

Imitation, or mimesis, may be the glue that binds culture, but we have yet to take the full measure of its forms, processes, and effects. This two-hour session is devoted to exploring mimesis within the realm of music—a line of inquiry that is still in its early stages. How does mimesis manifest itself within music? What makes musical mimesis important to study? How does it relate to other instances of mimesis in culture? We will broach these and other questions in a roundtable discussion moderated by Michael Puri (UVa), and featuring Arnie Cox (Oberlin College), Roger Mathew Grant (Wesleyan University), and Daniel Villegas Vélez (KU Leuven).  

 

Humanities Week 2021: The Story of Plastic Film Screening

April 20, 2021

UVA Ampitheater | 8:00 pm

Humanities Week 2021: The Story of Plastic Film Screening

April 20, 2021

UVA Ampitheater | 8:00 pm

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Humanities Week 2021: Cooking Class Livestream

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Humanities Week 2021: Cooking Class Livestream

April 20, 2021

Webinar | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

​Join Teen Chopped Champion and UVA fourth-year Veronica Seguin as she prepares a dish in the International Center kitchen! With people at home now more than ever, learning and improving our cooking skills has become the new normal. Buy the ingredients in advance and follow along to take care of dinner for the night!

 

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Humanities Week 2021: Normalcy in Politics Lecture and Q&A with Larry Sabato

April 19, 2021

Webinar | 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Humanities Week 2021: Normalcy in Politics Lecture and Q&A with Larry Sabato

April 19, 2021

Webinar | 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Tune in to catch a riveting, timely talk about (ab)normalcy in politics with Center for Politics Director Larry Sabato! The short talk will be followed by a brief Q&A where students will be able to submit questions for Prof. Sabato to answer, moderated by Humanities Week volunteers in the Batten School. Also be sure to check out a new book on the subject, A Return to Normalcy?, edited by Larry Sabato.

 

Zoom information

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Tessa Farmer, “Cairo’s Sabils: Gifting Water”

April 16, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 11:00 am

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Tessa Farmer, “Cairo’s Sabils: Gifting Water”

April 16, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 11:00 am

Tessa Farmer

Assistant Professor

Department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures; and, the Global Studies Program, University of Virginia

** Seminar:  April 16, 2021: “Cairo’s Sabils: Gifting Water”

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Project Summary

My research focuses on sabils, or charitable water fountains, as a key location for exploring vernacular water architecture and investigating the underlying conceptual frameworks that give them life. Sabils are important parts of the built environment of Cairo, drawing on religious precedence and enacting everyday ethical notions of reciprocity. They are particularly important in the changing environmental conditions of Cairo and point to the ways in which vernacular and small-scale water infrastructure can add to the picture of urban water resilience in the context of Climate Change. As vernacular memorials, sabils operate as the conduit and material co-producers of hasanat (merits accrued with God) for the souls of departed loved ones. As nodes in neighborly relations, sabils engage neighbors in practices of asynchronous exchanges of the embodied kindness of a cold drink of water and the ephemeral gift of participating in the accrual of divine favor. Sabils are an important manifestation of local process of creative resilience, everyday practices of tinkering and collective action that probe the limits of the possible, work to remake the built environment and stich together fluid social networks, and stake claims to the city. Additionally, the project will investigate the diversity of material forms, practices of care and repair for clay and metal water infrastructure, embodied notions of smell, taste and temperature, a shifting history of social responses to a material context of hardship, and practices of neighborliness that draw on religious traditions to shape the livability and transversability of Cairo’s urban landscapes.

 

Biography

Tessa Farmer is Assistant Professor in the Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures Department and the Global Studies Program at the University of Virginia, where she serves as the Track Director for the Global Studies-Middle East South Asia (GSMS) major. Tessa received her MA (2007) and PhD (2014) in Anthropology from the University of Texas at Austin. She conducted fieldwork in Cairo, Egypt between 2009 and 2019. Based on this work, her current book project, “Well-Connected: Everyday Water Practices in Cairo,” investigates the ways in which lower income residents of Cairo, Egypt work to obtain sources of potable water and deal with the ramifications of sewage in their urban ecology. A second project on charitable water fountains, sabils, is underway. Her research has been awarded funding by Fulbright Hayes, Social Science Research Council, PEO, the University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Virginia. Tessa’s work appeared in the Middle East Law and Governance Journal, the Journal of Sustainability Education, MERIP, and she co-guest edited a special issue on the Environment in the Middle East in the International Journal of Middle East Studies with Jessica Barnes.

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