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Mellon Fellows Seminar - Michael Puri, “Music, Mimesis, Modernity”

February 19, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Michael Puri, “Music, Mimesis, Modernity”

February 19, 2021

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Michael Puri

Associate Professor

Department of Music, University of Virginia

** Seminar:  February 19, 2021: “Music, Mimesis, Modernity”

 

“If human beings suddenly ceased imitating, all forms of culture would vanish.” This striking statement by René Girard invests imitation with an extraordinary ability to generate culture. It also implicitly challenges scholars to investigate the role of imitation within their particular fields of study.

 

My Mellon-sponsored project takes up this challenge from the standpoint of musicology. More specific, it focuses on mimesis—practices and theories of imitation—within western music of the modern industrial era. How has mimesis manifested itself within this context? How has it been conceptualized? How and why has it changed over time?

 

In this talk I will open up two perspectives on these matters. The first is pedagogical. I will discuss the process involved in constructing a syllabus for a seminar on this topic that I am currently offering to PhD students in Music and English. The second is research-oriented and seeks to delineate the role of mimesis within evolving notions of the artwork in early European modernism.

 

I begin by teasing out the presence of mimesis in and between Walter Benjamin’s concepts of craft and commodity as he developed them in his “Arcades Project.” This will help to show what Benjamin believed to have been gained and lost in the advent of capitalism over the course of the long nineteenth century, especially in France. I then consider how these approaches to mimesis might illuminate aspects of French music at the fin de siècle—in particular, the work of Maurice Ravel. His is a celebrated but conflicted oeuvre, one that is caught between the artisan’s atelier and the mass marketplace.

 

Bio: Michael J. Puri is Associate Professor in the Department of Music at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Ravel the Decadent and the editor of a forthcoming volume of essays on musical meaning and interpretation, both of which are published by Oxford. His work lies at the intersection of music, intellectual history, and critical theory. It has appeared in many venues and received support from a variety of institutions, including a year-long residential fellowship at the National Humanities Center and the Alfred Einstein Award from the American Musicological Society. He is currently working on two further monographs. One expands upon the topic of this presentation: relationships between mimesis and music in modernity. The other brings to light hitherto unrecognized connections between French and German music in the early twentieth century.

Conversation with MOISÉS KAUFMAN, Natl Medal of Arts Recipient & “Laramie Project” Creator

February 19, 2021

Webinar | 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Conversation with MOISÉS KAUFMAN, Natl Medal of Arts Recipient & “Laramie Project” Creator

February 19, 2021

Webinar | 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

 

Register here

Strange Bedfellows?: Asian American Studies & Asian Studies in the 21st Century

January 28, 2021

Webinar | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Strange Bedfellows?: Asian American Studies & Asian Studies in the 21st Century

January 28, 2021

Webinar | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Many Asian Studies programs in the U.S. find their roots in Cold War area studies, while many Asian American Studies programs were born out of 1960s ethnic studies, and at many institutions, faculty in both fields are separated by intellectual as well as institutional boundaries. Yet, as both fields attend to issues related to transnationalism, globalization, and diaspora, there are many possibilities for collaboration that do not fit into existing disciplinary and institutional structures.
 

Join us for a Zoom roundtable and discussion about histories and futures of Asian American Studies and Asian Studies and their co-existence and potential collaboration, featuring Asian American Studies scholars situated in a variety of departmental and program structures, and coming from a diverse set of institutions “East of California” (away from the epicenters of Asian American Studies program building in the West).

 

Confirmed roundtable participants:
Sylvia Chong, University of Virginia (moderator)
John Cheng, Binghamton University
Nerissa Balce, Stony Brook University
Christine So, Georgetown University
Nayoung Aimee Kwon, Duke University
Francis Tanglao-Aguas, William & Mary

 

Register here

Cosmopolitan Pedagogy in Asian Studies: A Roundtable Conversation

December 4, 2020

Webinar | 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Cosmopolitan Pedagogy in Asian Studies: A Roundtable Conversation

December 4, 2020

Webinar | 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Learn about the innovative teaching of Eileen Chow (Duke), Anand Vaidya (San Jose State), and Yến Lê Espiritu (UC-San Diego), and join them in a conversation about teaching Asian Studies in new ways and contexts.  

 

Register here

Asian Cosmopolitanisms Curricular Innovations

December 3, 2020

Webinar | 3:30 pm - 5:00pm

Asian Cosmopolitanisms Curricular Innovations

December 3, 2020

Webinar | 3:30 pm - 5:00pm

Faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students will discuss how they’ve integrated the themes of the Asian Cosmopolitanisms lab into existing classes and new course designs.  

 

Register here

Tehila Sasson (Emory), "Ethical Capitalism and the End of Empire"

December 1, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Tehila Sasson (Emory), "Ethical Capitalism and the End of Empire"

December 1, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Register here

Chronicles of the Apocalypse: Writing on Climate Change (w/ Amitav Ghosh, Terry Tempest Williams, & Emily Raboteau),

December 1, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Chronicles of the Apocalypse: Writing on Climate Change (w/ Amitav Ghosh, Terry Tempest Williams, & Emily Raboteau),

December 1, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Chronicles of the Apocalypse: Writing on Climate Change

A Conversation with Amitav Ghosh, Terry Tempest Williams,
& Emily Raboteau

Introduced by Jennifer Egan, President of PEN America


December 1, 2020 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm | Register here

Civilization and our planet's very future are now in doubt with a level of environmental crisis that demands the attention of fiction writers, journalists, and essayists. Acclaimed novelist Amitav Ghosh’s Gun Island exemplifies the new writing about the pressing realities of our rapidly changing planet. His story of forced migration follows the deadly 1970 Bhola Cyclone, which killed half a million people. Terry Tempest Williams’ collection of essays, Erosion, continues her environmental critiques of what we are losing beyond the living world—how we are eroding and evolving as our climate changes irrevocably. This is an urgent and necessary conversation on how writers are charting our apocalyptic future with moderator Emily Raboteau, a novelist and essayist who has been writing exclusively about the climate crisis for the last year.

 

Register here

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “Environmental Crisis and Security in the Indian Ocean” (with Sunil Amrith)

November 20, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “Environmental Crisis and Security in the Indian Ocean” (with Sunil Amrith)

November 20, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

 

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Indian Ocean region, with its fast-accelerating economies, its innumerable oil and gas producers, its collapsing ecosystems, its vulnerable yet rapidly-increasing populations, and its swiftly-expanding carbon footprint, will be the theatre in which the future of the world will be decided. How will the ongoing changes affect the material and cultural lives of the region’s peoples, who are simultaneously drivers and victims of climate change? Many of the world’s major zones of conflict are already clustered around the Indian Ocean, and the region is also the theater of many accelerating arms races. How will these developments affect the global balance of power? What lessons might past climatic shifts offer for the future? These are some of the issues that will be discussed over the four two-hour sessions of this workshop. 

 

November 20: Environmental Crisis and Security in the Indian Ocean

 

With guest speaker: Sunil Amrith (Harvard)

 

  • Sunil Amrith, “When the Waters Rise,” from Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants, Harvard UP, 2013
  • Sunil Amrith, excerpts from Unruly Waters: How Rains, Rivers, Coasts and Seas Have Shaped Asia’s History, Basic Books, 2018.
  • Simon Dalby, Chapter 5 & 6 from Security and Environmental Change, Polity Press 2009.
  • Sanjay Chaturvedi and Timothy Doyle, “Geopolitics of Fear and the Emergence of Climate Refugees: Imaginative Geographies of Climate Change and Displacements in Bangladesh,” Journal of the Indian Ocean Region, 6:2, 2010, pp. 206-222
  • Brahma Chellaney, “Indian Ocean Maritime Security: Energy, Environmental and Climate Challenges,” Journal of the Indian Ocean Region, 6:2, 2010, pp 155-168.
  • Michelle Voyer et.al, “Maritime Security and the Blue Economy: Intersections and Interdependencies in the Indian Ocean,” Journal of the Indian Ocean Region, 14:1, 2018, pp 28-48

Ali A. Rizvi, "The Recent Rise of Secular Thought in the Muslim World"

November 18, 2020

Webinar | 5 pm

Ali A. Rizvi, "The Recent Rise of Secular Thought in the Muslim World"

November 18, 2020

Webinar | 5 pm

Priyamvada Gopal (Cambridge), "Decolonization and the Western University"

November 17, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Priyamvada Gopal (Cambridge), "Decolonization and the Western University"

November 17, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Register here

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part IV)

November 16, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part IV)

November 16, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

IHGC Fall Seminar with Deborah Baker

Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism”

 

Mondays, 3.00-5.00pm

 

Dates

October 26

November 2

November 9

November 16

 

 

We are living in a time of rising extremism and increasing polarization around the world.  This trend has been accompanied by acts of millenarian terror, generally committed by men who believe themselves and their identities and beliefs to be facing an existential threat.  What narrative strategies can be used to dramatize the conflict between those who want to destroy civil society, replacing civic norms with ones in which they are the unquestioned arbiters, and those who seek to protect the status quo? In this seminar we will look at works of fiction and narrative non-fiction that have captured this struggle in all its moral, political, and historical dimensions.

 

Reading list:

The Convert by Deborah Baker (narrative non-fiction)

One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway by Asne Sierstad  (narrative non-fiction)

American War by Omar el Akkad (futurist fiction)

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (speculative fiction)

Defying Hitler by Sebastien Haffner (posthumous memoir)

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Kasey Jernigan, “Mapping Indigenous/UVA Relations”

November 13, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Kasey Jernigan, “Mapping Indigenous/UVA Relations”

November 13, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Register here

Mapping Indigenous/UVA Relations: Stories of Space, Place, and Histories is a participatory action methodological project that focuses on sparsely documented Indigenous relations with the University of Virginia. This project combines archival materials related to Indigenous histories and presences in and around UVA with Virginia tribal citizens’ personal digital stories that articulate Indigenous perspectives, knowledge, and stories of space, place, and histories. Digital stories are powerful and brief visual narratives that have the potential to uncover histories layered into the fabric of UVA, Charlottesville, and the surrounding areas. Centering tribal citizens not as research participants, but as research partners, shifts power dynamics inherent in traditional research methods, allowing for new knowledge to emerge that is mediated by Indigenous perspectives and returns this knowledge to communities as Indigenously-informed. This project seeks to offer an alternative to mainstream mapping techniques that, when created by Indigenous peoples, serve as a localized counter-mapping project using multi-sensorial techniques to imbue meaning and ways of knowing spaces and places. As a new modality for “sensing” Indigenous research, digital stories combined with archived materials enable us to conceptualize place not just cognitively, but through the many sensory channels of experience, revealing unspoken insights and embodied or visually-articulated life-worlds not easily captured through traditional means. Taking seriously digital stories as sense-making intimate objects, Indigenous-produced digital stories have the capacity to serve as transformative artifacts of understanding, pushing the production of knowledge – and just what constitutes this knowledge – in new directions to inform our understandings of Indigenous/UVA relations.  

 

Bio:

As a critical medical anthropologist, my research focuses on obesity (and related chronic conditions) at the intersections of issues related to structural violence, historical trauma, heritage narratives, and meaning-making among Indigenous communities in Oklahoma. Using collaborative and participatory methods, my research examines the socio-cultural, economic, political, and historical influences of health, while centering tribal citizens’ personal stories and meaning-making in these processes. In my current book project, Embodied Heritage: Commod Bods and Indian Identities, I examine the ways shifting patterns of participation in food and nutrition assistance programs (commodity foods in particular) have shaped Indigenous foodways; how these foodways are linked to Indigenous bodies and health; and how foodways and bodies are intertwined with structural violence, identity, and heritage.

 

I received my PhD in anthropology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, with a Graduate Certificate in Native American and Indigenous Studies. I also hold an MPH in epidemiology from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. I come to UVA from Wesleyan University where I was the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Native American Studies.

 

I am a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and grew up in Tulsa, OK.

 

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “The Arts of Living in a Precarious Age” (with Anand Pandian)

November 13, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “The Arts of Living in a Precarious Age” (with Anand Pandian)

November 13, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

 

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Indian Ocean region, with its fast-accelerating economies, its innumerable oil and gas producers, its collapsing ecosystems, its vulnerable yet rapidly-increasing populations, and its swiftly-expanding carbon footprint, will be the theatre in which the future of the world will be decided. How will the ongoing changes affect the material and cultural lives of the region’s peoples, who are simultaneously drivers and victims of climate change? Many of the world’s major zones of conflict are already clustered around the Indian Ocean, and the region is also the theater of many accelerating arms races. How will these developments affect the global balance of power? What lessons might past climatic shifts offer for the future? These are some of the issues that will be discussed over the four two-hour sessions of this workshop. 

 

November 13: The Arts of Living in a Precarious Age

 

With guest speaker: Anand Pandian (Johns Hopkins)

 

  • Anand Pandian, Introduction to A Possible Anthropology: Methods for Uneasy Times, Duke UP, 2019.
  • Nils Bubandt, “Haunted Geologies: Spirits, Stones and the Necropolitics of the Anthropocene,” Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet, eds. Anne Tsing, et.al. University of Minnesota Press, 2017
  • Wu Ming-Yi, excerpts from the novel, The Man with the Compound Eyes, Taiwan: Summer Festival Press, 2011.
  • Jason Decaires Taylor, underwater art installations

https://www.underwatersculpture.com/

IHGC & PEN America - Democracy in Danger Podcast

November 12, 2020

Webinar | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

IHGC & PEN America - Democracy in Danger Podcast

November 12, 2020

Webinar | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Join Siva and Will for a live recording of Democracy in Danger, a new podcast from UVA's Deliberative Media Lab. Their special guests will discuss the challenges facing Democracy in the wake of 2020. After a historic year marked by a global pandemic, economic catastrophe, educational upheaval, the struggle for racial equity, and a chaotic national election, what is America's path forward?

Register here

 

Joanne Rappaport, "Cowards Don’t Make History: A Discussion about Participatory Action Research"

November 11, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Joanne Rappaport, "Cowards Don’t Make History: A Discussion about Participatory Action Research"

November 11, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Joanne Rappaport, "Cowards Don’t Make History: A Discussion about Participatory Action Research"

About this Event

Registration link

 

How can research serve liberatory and emancipatory ends? In the early 1970s, a group of Colombian intellectuals led by the pioneering sociologist Orlando Fals Borda created a research-activist collective called La Rosca de Investigación y Acción Social (Circle of Research and Social Action) that developed a method of collaboration known as Participatory Action Research. In her recently-published book Cowards Don’t Make History: Orlando Fals Borda and the Origins of Participatory Action Research (Duke University Press, 2020), Joanne Rappaport examines the development of Participatory Action Research on Colombia’s Caribbean coast, where Fals Borda and his colleagues collaborated with the National Peasant Users Association. By coordinating research priorities with peasant leaders, studying the history of peasant struggles and preparing accessible materials for an organizational readership, activist-researchers transformed research into a political organizing tool.

 

Professor Rappaport’s talk will introduce the participatory methods of knowledge construction developed by Fals Borda and his colleagues in 1970s Colombia, with particular attention to the role that visuality and graphic storytelling played in their work. The presentation will be followed by a discussion of the continuing relevance and potential applications of Participatory Action Research in other contexts, including Charlottesville.

 

This event is organized by PhD candidates Mathilda Shepard and Matthew Slaats as a part of the IHGC PhD Public Humanities Lab.

 

 

Joanne Rappaport is an anthropologist in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Georgetown University. Professor Rappaport’s research interests include ethnicity, historical anthropology, new social movements, literacy, race, collaborative research methodologies, and Andean ethnography and ethnohistory. She has published four single-authored books, as well as teaching in the Ethnoeducation Program of the Universidad del Cauca (Colombia) and the Community Pedagogy Program of the Autonomous Indigenous Intercultural University sponsored by the Consejo Regional Indígena del Cauca (CRIC). She has also collaborated with the Casa del Pensamiento, a research unit of the Asociación de Cabildos Indígenas del Norte del Cauca (ACIN). Professor Rappaport is currently working with Altais Comics on a graphic history based on her study of Fals Borda.

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part III)

November 9, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part III)

November 9, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

IHGC Fall Seminar with Deborah Baker

Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism”

 

Mondays, 3.00-5.00pm

 

Dates

October 26

November 2

November 9

November 16

 

 

We are living in a time of rising extremism and increasing polarization around the world.  This trend has been accompanied by acts of millenarian terror, generally committed by men who believe themselves and their identities and beliefs to be facing an existential threat.  What narrative strategies can be used to dramatize the conflict between those who want to destroy civil society, replacing civic norms with ones in which they are the unquestioned arbiters, and those who seek to protect the status quo? In this seminar we will look at works of fiction and narrative non-fiction that have captured this struggle in all its moral, political, and historical dimensions.

 

Reading list:

The Convert by Deborah Baker (narrative non-fiction)

One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway by Asne Sierstad  (narrative non-fiction)

American War by Omar el Akkad (futurist fiction)

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (speculative fiction)

Defying Hitler by Sebastien Haffner (posthumous memoir)

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Ari Blatt, “State of Place, State of Mind: Vernacular Landscapes in Contemporary French Photography”

November 6, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Ari Blatt, “State of Place, State of Mind: Vernacular Landscapes in Contemporary French Photography”

November 6, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Ari Blatt

Associate Professor

Department of French, University of Virginia

** Seminar:  November 6, 2020: “State of Place, State of Mind:  Vernacular Landscapes in Contemporary French Photography”

 

Project Summary

Since the mid-1980s, art photographers from metropolitan France have been training their lenses on places throughout the country they call home. Their work constitutes a dynamic, thoughtful, and altogether transformative way of envisioning what on the surface might seem like perfectly mundane locations, but which the photographs endorse as landscapes endowed with the capacity to expand and indeed “scape” our experience and understanding of modern France. My current book project, The Topographic Imaginary: Attending to Place in Contemporary French Photography, introduces readers to a selection of some of the most compelling artists who exemplify this trend. Particularly sensitive to the physiognomic state of the nation today—and to environments both natural and manmade—the pictures they produce depict diverse sectors of terrain from throughout urban, peri-urban, and rural France. They are especially adept at rendering the variegated contours and surface features of some of the nation’s most unheralded and vernacular landscapes more visible than they have ever been before. As they investigate various zones of the real that, under most conditions, would normally elude us, these images contribute to a consistently emerging sense of place and shape our gaze of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century France in exciting new ways. They invest the places they picture with meaning and re-negotiate how the nation has come to be seen. They revisit, challenge, and disorient dominant conceptions associated with the French photographic tradition and the mythologies it has engendered. And they show how contemporary photographers deploy the medium and experiment with its conventions to reimagine a more traditional and time-worn idea of the country’s shared common space.

 

Biography

Ari Blatt is Associate Professor in the Department of French at UVa. A specialist of modern and contemporary French literature and culture, he is the author of Pictures into Words: Images in Contemporary French Fiction (Nebraska, 2012). Other published or forthcoming work includes articles on television and literature; on manic fiction; on the suspension of movement in cinema; on topographic narrative; on writing about walking; and on looking at (and listening to) trees. He recently co-edited an essay collection entitled France in Flux: Space, Territory, and Contemporary Culture (Liverpool, 2019), and is writing a book on vernacular landscapes in contemporary French photography.

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “The Little Ice Age in Tokugawa Japan and Mughal India: Early Modern Perspectives”; (with Julia Adeney Thomas, University of Notre Dame)

November 6, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “The Little Ice Age in Tokugawa Japan and Mughal India: Early Modern Perspectives”; (with Julia Adeney Thomas, University of Notre Dame)

November 6, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

 

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Indian Ocean region, with its fast-accelerating economies, its innumerable oil and gas producers, its collapsing ecosystems, its vulnerable yet rapidly-increasing populations, and its swiftly-expanding carbon footprint, will be the theatre in which the future of the world will be decided. How will the ongoing changes affect the material and cultural lives of the region’s peoples, who are simultaneously drivers and victims of climate change? Many of the world’s major zones of conflict are already clustered around the Indian Ocean, and the region is also the theater of many accelerating arms races. How will these developments affect the global balance of power? What lessons might past climatic shifts offer for the future? These are some of the issues that will be discussed over the four two-hour sessions of this workshop. 

 

November 6: The Little Ice Age in Tokugawa Japan, the Dutch Republic, and Mughal India: Early Modern Perspectives

 

With guest speaker, Julia Adeney Thomas (Notre Dame)

 

  • Dagomar Degroot, excerpt from The Frigid Golden Age: Climate Change, the Little Ice Age and the Dutch Republic, 1560-1720, Cambridge UP, 2018.  
  • Julia Adeney Thomas, “Practicing Hope in the Anthropocene” (unpublished work)
  • Julia Adeney Thomas, “History and Biology in the Anthropocene: Problems of Scale, Problems of Value,” American Historical Review, December 2014.
  • Sugata Ray, “Hydroaesthetics in the Little Ice Age: Theology, Artistic Cultures and Environmental Transformation in Early Modern Braj, c 1560-70” South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, 40:1, pp1-23.
  • Amitav Ghosh, excerpts from Gun Island

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part II)

November 2, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part II)

November 2, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

IHGC Fall Seminar with Deborah Baker

Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism”

 

Mondays, 3.00-5.00pm

 

Dates

October 26

November 2

November 9

November 16

 

 

We are living in a time of rising extremism and increasing polarization around the world.  This trend has been accompanied by acts of millenarian terror, generally committed by men who believe themselves and their identities and beliefs to be facing an existential threat.  What narrative strategies can be used to dramatize the conflict between those who want to destroy civil society, replacing civic norms with ones in which they are the unquestioned arbiters, and those who seek to protect the status quo? In this seminar we will look at works of fiction and narrative non-fiction that have captured this struggle in all its moral, political, and historical dimensions.

 

Reading list:

The Convert by Deborah Baker (narrative non-fiction)

One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway by Asne Sierstad  (narrative non-fiction)

American War by Omar el Akkad (futurist fiction)

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (speculative fiction)

Defying Hitler by Sebastien Haffner (posthumous memoir)

NEW DATE & TIME: Deborah Baker, "In the Heart of Whiteness; Charlottesville, Modernism, and White Supremacy"

November 2, 2020

Webinar | 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

NEW DATE & TIME: Deborah Baker, "In the Heart of Whiteness; Charlottesville, Modernism, and White Supremacy"

November 2, 2020

Webinar | 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Deborah Baker, "In the Heart of Whiteness; Charlottesville, Modernism, and White Supremacy"

Zoom link (no registration required)
To understand the Unite the Rally of 2017, I will talk about a forgotten episode in the city's history when another white supremacist chose Charlottesville as the staging ground for a race war. This earlier event illuminates in unsettling ways how academia and high modernism conspired to re-center whiteness in the American mainstream.

Deborah Baker was born in Charlottesville and grew up in Virginia, Puerto Rico and New England.  She attended the University of Virginia and Cambridge University.  Her first biography, written in college, was Making a Farm: The Life of Robert Bly, published by Beacon Press in 1982. After working a number of years as a book editor and publisher, in 1990 she moved to Calcutta where she wrote In Extremis; The Life of Laura Riding.  Published by Grove Press and Hamish Hamilton in the UK, it was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography in 1994.  Her third book, A Blue Hand: The Beats in India was published by Penguin Press USA and Penguin India in 2008. In 2008–2009 she was a Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis C. Cullman Center for Writers and Scholars at The New York Public Library.  There she researched and wrote The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, a narrative account of the life of an American convert to Islam, drawn on letters on deposit in the library’s manuscript division. The Convert, published by Graywolf and Penguin India, was a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award in Non-Fiction. In August 2018, she published her fifth work of non-fiction, The Last Englishmen: Love, War and the End of Empire.

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Allison Bigelow, “Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Seminar - Allison Bigelow, “Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Allison Bigelow

Tom Scully Discovery Chair Associate Professor of Spanish

Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese, University of Virginia

** Seminar:  October 30, 2020:  “Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World”

REGISTER HERE

 

Project Summary

I am beginning a new project at IHGC, one that builds from the methods that I developed in my first book, Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture for the University of North Carolina Press, May 2020). My new project turns from mining to agriculture, another critical vernacular science and a root paradigm of settler colonialism. In what I am tentatively titling Women of Corn, Men of Corn: The Meanings of Maize Agriculture in the Early Americas, I will compare agricultural technologies and the techniques of maize cultivation in two regions of the hemisphere, Mayan-speaking Mesoamerica, where men grew crops, and the Algonquin-speaking Chesapeake, where women took charge of farming. This framework of similarity and difference will allow me to analyze how gender influenced agricultural life, and how agricultural patterns shaped gender systems, before and after the European invasion.

 

Biography

Allison Bigelow is the Tom Scully Discovery Chair Associate Professor of Spanish in the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese. She is the author of Mining Language: Racial Thinking, Indigenous Knowledge, and Colonial Metallurgy in the Early Modern Iberian World (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture for UNC Press, 2020), the first book-length study of the technical and scientific vocabularies that miners developed in early modern Iberian colonies. Her research on Indigenous knowledge production, gender systems, and colonial science has been funded by the NEH, ACLS, and Huntington Library, and it is published in journals like Anuario de estudios bolivianosEarly American LiteratureEarly American StudiesEthnohistoryJournal of Extractive Industries and Societies, and PMLA. With Rafael Alvarado (https://datascience.virginia.edu/people/rafael-alvarado) she is the co-PI of the UVA Multepal Project, a scholarly and pedagogical initiative in digital Mesoamerican studies. Multepal's current focus is to prepare digital critical editions of the sacred book of the Maya K'iche', Popol Wuj (https://multepal.github.io/popolwuj/). At IHGC, Allison is beginning a new project, tentatively titled Women of Corn, Men of Corn: The Meanings of Maize Agriculture in the Early Americas, which will compare agricultural technologies in two regions of the Americas: Mesoamerica, where men grew crops, and the Chesapeake, where women took charge of farming.

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “Indian Ocean Worlds and the Anthropocene”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh Fall 2020 Seminar: “Indian Ocean Worlds and the Anthropocene”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is becoming increasingly clear that the Indian Ocean region, with its fast-accelerating economies, its innumerable oil and gas producers, its collapsing ecosystems, its vulnerable yet rapidly-increasing populations, and its swiftly-expanding carbon footprint, will be the theatre in which the future of the world will be decided. How will the ongoing changes affect the material and cultural lives of the region’s peoples, who are simultaneously drivers and victims of climate change? Many of the world’s major zones of conflict are already clustered around the Indian Ocean, and the region is also the theater of many accelerating arms races. How will these developments affect the global balance of power? What lessons might past climatic shifts offer for the future? These are some of the issues that will be discussed over the four two-hour sessions of this workshop. 

For more information, e-mail Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com)

October 30: Indian Ocean Worlds and the Anthropocene

 

  • Markus Vink, “Indian Ocean Studies and the New Thalassalogy,” Journal of Global History, 2, pp 41-62.
  • Will Steffen, Paul Crutzen and John McNeill, “The Anthropocene: Are Humans Now Overwhelming the Great Forces of Nature,” Ambio, 36:8, Dec 2007 (publication of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences)
  • Amitav Ghosh, The Great Derangement, part I, “Stories” University of Chicago Press, 2016.
  • Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Climate and Capital: On Conjoined Histories,” Critical Inquiry, 41:1, 2014, pp 1-23.
  • Elizabeth Deloughrey, “Toward a Critical Ocean Studies for the Anthropocene” English Language Notes, 57:1, April 2019

Amitav Ghosh, “Future or Past? Climate Change as seen from the Global North and South”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh, “Future or Past? Climate Change as seen from the Global North and South”

October 30, 2020

Webinar | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Amitav Ghosh, “Future or Past? Climate Change as seen from the Global North and South”

Friday October 30, 2020 | 3.00-4.00 pm | Zoom link (no registration required)

In the West, no matter whether in economics, science or indeed, fiction, climate change is almost always imagined in relation to the future.  In the global south the imagining of climate change is markedly different. This talk will examine some of the differences between the two perspectives.

Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He studied in Delhi, Oxford and Alexandria and is the author of The Circle of ReasonThe Shadow LinesIn An Antique LandDancing in CambodiaThe Calcutta ChromosomeThe Glass PalaceThe Hungry Tide, and the three volumes of The Ibis Trilogy; Sea of PoppiesRiver of Smoke and Flood of Fire.The Circle of Reason was awarded France’s Prix Médicis in 1990, and The Shadow Lines won two prestigious Indian prizes the same year, the Sahitya Akademi Award and the Ananda Puraskar. The Calcutta Chromosome won the Arthur C. Clarke award for 1997 and The Glass Palace won the International e-Book Award at the Frankfurt book fair in 2001. In January 2005 The Hungry Tide was awarded the Crossword Book Prize, a major Indian award. His novel, Sea of Poppies (2008) was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, 2008 and was awarded the Crossword Book Prize and the India Plaza Golden Quill Award.

Stuart Ward (University of Copenhagen), "Human Rights After Smuts"

October 27, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Stuart Ward (University of Copenhagen), "Human Rights After Smuts"

October 27, 2020

Webinar | 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Register here

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part I)

October 26, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Deborah Baker Fall 2020 Seminar: “Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism” (Part I)

October 26, 2020

Webinar | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Register HERE

IHGC Fall Seminar with Deborah Baker

Narrative in the Age of Political Extremism”

 

Mondays, 3.00-5.00pm

 

Dates

October 26

November 2

November 9

November 16

 

 

We are living in a time of rising extremism and increasing polarization around the world.  This trend has been accompanied by acts of millenarian terror, generally committed by men who believe themselves and their identities and beliefs to be facing an existential threat.  What narrative strategies can be used to dramatize the conflict between those who want to destroy civil society, replacing civic norms with ones in which they are the unquestioned arbiters, and those who seek to protect the status quo? In this seminar we will look at works of fiction and narrative non-fiction that have captured this struggle in all its moral, political, and historical dimensions.

 

Reading list:

The Convert by Deborah Baker (narrative non-fiction)

One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway by Asne Sierstad  (narrative non-fiction)

American War by Omar el Akkad (futurist fiction)

The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (speculative fiction)

Defying Hitler by Sebastien Haffner (posthumous memoir)

Pages