University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

News

Global South Soccer

November 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Global South Soccer

November 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Informal Urbanisms Workshop

November 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Informal Urbanisms Workshop

November 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium

November 10, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium

November 10, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Global Thinkers Series: Hannah Arendt, Mahatma Gandhi and Ibn Tufayal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Global Thinkers Series: Hannah Arendt, Mahatma Gandhi and Ibn Tufayal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

A Night of Sufi Music and Ghazals

October 15, 2017

Old Cabell Hall Auditorium | 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

A Night of Sufi Music and Ghazals

October 15, 2017

Old Cabell Hall Auditorium | 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Ongoing Mahfil: The Urdu Ghazal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Ongoing Mahfil: The Urdu Ghazal

October 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Global Political Thought Workshop

October 5, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Global Political Thought Workshop

October 5, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Television Studies in the Global South

September 25, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:00 am

Television Studies in the Global South

September 25, 2017

Wilson 142 | 9:00 am

Music and the Inner World

September 23, 2017

Music and the Inner World

September 23, 2017

The conference will address a range of issues related to music and “the inner world,” a phrase open to various interpretations. The program of invited speakers brings together different psychological/psychoanalytic orientations and different scholarly or professional relations to music. There will be nine half-hour presentations, each followed by a half hour of discussion, along with a keynote presentation. Conference sessions will take place all day Saturday, September 23, and on Sunday morning, ending at 12:30 PM.

 

The keynote speaker, Francis Grier, based in London, is a distinguished composer and performer, as well as a practicing psychoanalyst. Other presenters include Diane Austin (NYU; music therapist, author of a book on uses of voice in therapy); Seth Brodsky (University of Chicago; author of a recent book about Lacan and musical modernism); Nomi Dave (University of Virginia; research on music, politics, and pleasure); Marion Guck (University of Michigan; recent research on psychoanalytic concepts as models for the music-listener relationship); Erin Johnson and Cara Marinucci (Integrative Music Institute, Charlottesville private practice therapists and trainers of The Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music); Fred Maus (University of Virginia; recent work on object relations psychoanalysis and music); Jenny Johnson (Wellesley College; composer and author of publications about music and trauma); Mitchell Morris (UCLA; author of a book about 70s popular music and pleasure; influenced by Klein and Winnicott); and Michael Puri (University of Virginia; author of a book on Ravel and other publications that draw on psychoanalysis).

 

Conference events on Saturday and Sunday are free and open to the public. Potential attendees from outside Charlottesville should be aware that hotel accommodations often fill up because of visitors to the University, especially on weekends, and should plan ahead.

Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

September 22, 2017

Gibson Room Cocke Hall | 9:00 am

Time and Eternity in Archaic Greek Literature

September 22, 2017

Gibson Room Cocke Hall | 9:00 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium

September 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Mellon Fellows Symposium

September 15, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Workshop on Global Water (convened by Christian McMillen)

May 8, 2017

TBD | 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Workshop on Global Water (convened by Christian McMillen)

May 8, 2017

TBD | 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Davide Domenici Roundtable: "Material Indians, Early Modern Circulation of Ethnographica

May 4, 2017

Wilson 142 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Davide Domenici Roundtable: "Material Indians, Early Modern Circulation of Ethnographica

May 4, 2017

Wilson 142 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Please join us on Thursday, May 4, from 2:30-4 pm in Wilson 142 for a roundtable discussion with Professor Davide Domenici (Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà/Department of History, Culture, and Civilization, University of Bologna).

 

As part of Professor Domenici's week-long visit to UVa, sponsored by the Institute of the Humanities & Global Cultures, we'll discuss "Material Indians: Early Modern Circulation of Ethnographica and the Construction of the Indies as a Global Category."

 

For more information, please contact professors Allison Bigelow and Ricardo Padrón.

Workshop on the Historical Novel and Ethnographic Writing with Amitav Ghosh

April 28, 2017

Brooks Hall Commons | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Workshop on the Historical Novel and Ethnographic Writing with Amitav Ghosh

April 28, 2017

Brooks Hall Commons | 10:30 am - 12:30 pm

A workshop on the historical novel and ethnographic writing with members of the Mellon Global South Lab and Department of Anthropology students and faculty.

A Conversation with Amitav Ghosh on The Great Derangement

April 27, 2017

Harrison/Small Auditorium | 4.30 - 6.00 p.m.

A Conversation with Amitav Ghosh on The Great Derangement

April 27, 2017

Harrison/Small Auditorium | 4.30 - 6.00 p.m.

Harrison Small Auditorium
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

In this evening event, Distinguished Writer-in-Residence Amitav Ghosh will speak about his newest book, The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable (2016). This event will include a brief conversation between Ghosh and Professor Debjani Ganguly, Director of Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, a public Q&A, and a reception following the event.

Here's how Chicago UP describes the book: "Are we deranged? The acclaimed Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh argues that future generations may well think so. How else to explain our imaginative failure in the face of global warming? In his first major book of nonfiction since In an Antique Land, Ghosh examines our inability—at the level of literature, history, and politics—to grasp the scale and violence of climate change."

Read more about The Great Derangment.

Amitav Ghosh Public Lecture - From Bombay to Canton and Back: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route

April 26, 2017

Nau 101 | 4:30 - 6:00 p.m.

Amitav Ghosh Public Lecture - From Bombay to Canton and Back: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route

April 26, 2017

Nau 101 | 4:30 - 6:00 p.m.

Public Lecture, 4.30pm-6.00pm
Nau Hall 101

From Bombay to Canton: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route 

Guangzhou (also known as Canton) is one of the world’s great cosmopolitan entrepots. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, it was through this city, and its environs, that opium was funneled into China by British, American and Indian merchants. This trade was to have an enormous impact , not just  on China but the whole world: its influence on India was especially significant, for the subcontinent was the world's leading opium-producing region under the British Raj.  This talk explores Guangzhou as an Indian trader might have seen it in the 19th century.

"Language at the Bar: James Joyce, Myles Joyce and the 1882 Maamtrasna Murders (Galway, Ireland) Revisited," Prof. Margaret Kelleher Public Lecture

April 20, 2017

Bryan Faculty Lounge | 4:30 - 6:00 pm

"Language at the Bar: James Joyce, Myles Joyce and the 1882 Maamtrasna Murders (Galway, Ireland) Revisited," Prof. Margaret Kelleher Public Lecture

April 20, 2017

Bryan Faculty Lounge | 4:30 - 6:00 pm

Biography

 

Professor Margaret Kelleher was awarded the Chair of Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama in 2012.  For the previous five years, she was founding director of An Foras Feasa: the Institute for Research in Irish Historical and Cultural Traditions, at NUI Maynooth. Her books include The Feminization of Famine (published by Duke UP and Cork UP, 1997) and the landmark publication The Cambridge History of Irish Literature (2006), co-edited with Philip O¿Leary. She was a contributing editor to Field Day Anthology Volumes 4 and 5, and editor of the special issue on the Irish Literary Revival forIrish University Review (2003). Her primary research interests include nineteenth-century literature, famine literature, women¿s writings, cultural history, and the historical relationship between literature in English and Irish. 
 

She was awarded an IRCHSS Senior Project Fellowship in 2011 to create an electronic version of the Loebers' Guide to Irish Fiction (operative from November 2012 at http://www.lgif.ie) and has worked with colleagues in An Foras Feasa on a number of groundbreaking digital humanities projects. She was Principal Investigator (with John Keating) of the PRTLI 4 funded project 'Humanities, Technology and Innovation" 2007-2011 (grant award ¿5.8 m) and NUI Maynooth's Principal Investigator from 2011-2012 for the PRTLI 5 funded Digital Arts and Humanities PhD programme (grant award ¿750,000). Her current research project is a study of bilingual culture in nineteenth-century Ireland.
 

A leading advocate for Irish studies internationally, Professor Kelleher is Chairperson of the International Association for the Study of Irish Literatures, Chair of the Irish Film Institute and a member of the Humanities Committee of Science Europe.  Educated at University College Cork and Boston College, she has been visiting Professor at Concordia University Montreal, University of São Paulo, Boston College and Beijing Foreign Studies University, and was recently awarded a visiting fellowship at St John's College, Cambridge. She is Director of the MA in Anglo-Irish Literature in the School of English, Drama and Film.

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Carmen Lamas, Christian McMillen, Enrico Cesaretti)

April 14, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Carmen Lamas, Christian McMillen, Enrico Cesaretti)

April 14, 2017

Wilson 142 | 10:00 am

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday April 14, 2017

10.00am-1.30pm

142 Wilson Hall

 

Enrico Cesaretti, Associate Professor of Italian

"Slick Territories: Two Oil Encounters Italian Style"

10:00 am - 10:45 am

 

Carmen Lamas, Assistant Professor of Latina/o Literature and Latina/o Studies, Department of English

"Archival Interventions in the Latino Nineteenth Century"

10:45 am - 11:30 am

 

Christian McMillen, Professor, Department of History

"Clean Drinking Water and Sanitation in the Global South, 1970 to the Present"

11:30 am - 12:15 pm

 

Lunch

12:15 pm - 1:30 pm

"Social Movements: Where Have All the Leaders Gone?" Prof. Michael Hardt Public Lecture

April 11, 2017

Nau 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

"Social Movements: Where Have All the Leaders Gone?" Prof. Michael Hardt Public Lecture

April 11, 2017

Nau 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

We continue to witness each year the eruption of “leaderless” social movements.  From North Africa and the Middle East to Europe, the Americas, and East Asia, movements have left journalists, political analysts, police forces, and governments disoriented and perplexed.  Activists too have struggled to understand and evaluate the power and effectiveness of horizontal movements.  The movements have proven able to pose democratic ideals, sometimes to force reforms, and to pressure and even overthrow regimes – and, indeed, widespread social processes have been set in motion in coordination with or as consequence of them – but the movements tend to be short-lived and seem unable to bring about lasting social transformation.  Many assume that if only social movements could find new leaders they would return to their earlier glory and be able to sustain and achieve projects of social transformation and liberation.  Where, they ask, are the new Martin Luther King Jr.s, Rudi Dutschkes, Patrice Lumumbas, and Steve Bikos?  Where have all the leaders gone? Leadership has become a conundrum that today’s movements seem unable to solve, but the leadership problem in revolutionary and progressive movements is not entirely new.  In this lecture, Hardt will use some examples from past theory and practice to situate and clarify some of the issues and alternatives involved in the organization of social movements today.

Time: 5:30 - 7:00 pm
Location: Nau Hall 101

Biography
 

Michael Hardt is Professor of Literature in the Department of Romance Studies at Duke University. His writings explore the new forms of domination in the contemporary world as well as the social movements and other forces of liberation that resist them. In the Empire trilogy -- Empire (2000), Multitude (2004), and Commonwealth (2009) -- he and Antonio Negri investigate the political, legal, economic, and social aspects of globalization. They also study the political and economic alternatives that could lead to a more democratic world. Their pamphlet Declaration (2012) attempts to articulate the significance of the encampments and occupations that began in 2011, from Tahrir Square to Zuccotti Park, and to recognize the primary challenges faced by emerging democratic social movements today. 

"Excavating Contemporary Capitalism: Toward a Critique of Extraction Writ Large," Prof. Sandro Mezzadra Public Lecture

April 10, 2017

Wilson 142 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

"Excavating Contemporary Capitalism: Toward a Critique of Extraction Writ Large," Prof. Sandro Mezzadra Public Lecture

April 10, 2017

Wilson 142 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Time: 4:30 - 6:00 pm
Location: Wilson142

 

Is globalization over in the age of Trump? The talk will take this question as a point of departure and will focus on actually existing global processes in order to suggest that what is currently at stake is rather a set of conflicts and tensions surrounding the direction of globalization and the organization of its spaces. It will attempt to shed light on the specific “rationality,” or “logic” underlying operations of capital in strategically important “sectors” of economic activity – such as extraction, logistics, and finance. The talk aims to show that such operative logic eschews containment and articulation by the nation state and has rather “global” characteristics. It argues for the need to work toward an expanded notion of extraction and to look at the ways in which extraction writ large shapes contemporary capitalism. The talk will end by asking a set of important questions regarding a politics capable of effectively confronting this increasingly extractive capitalism and opening up new vistas of liberation and life beyond the rule of capital.

 

Biography 

 

Sandro Mezzadra teaches political theory at the University of Bologna. In the last decade his work has centered on the relations between globalization, migration and capitalism as well as on postcolonial criticism. He is an active participant in the ‘post-workerist’ debates and one of the founders of the website www.euronomade.info. Among his books: Diritto di fuga. Migrazioni, cittadinanza, globalizzazione (“The right to escape: Migration, citizenship, globalization”, ombre corte, 2006), La condizione postcoloniale. Storia e politica nel presente globale (“The postcolonial condition: History and politics in the global present”, ombre corte, 2008) and Nei cantieri marxiani. Il soggetto e la sua produzione (“In the Marxian Workshops. The Subject and its Production”, Manifestolibri, 2014). With Brett Neilson he is the author of Border as Method, or, the Multiplication of Labor (Duke University Press, 2013).

Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

April 8, 2017

Wilson 142 | 8:30 am

Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

April 8, 2017

Wilson 142 | 8:30 am

Many conversations in environmental humanities involve selecting and interpreting scientific data, then adding contributions from humanities fields to that quantitative base. Our symposium asks what happens when the equation is flipped—when we assume that many environmental issues start with the humanities. What questions are we best positioned to pose, and to explore? How can scientists help us, instead of the other way around? How are the humanities particularly suited to explore issues of environmental justice at the intersection of creative and critical practice? The symposium will explore these questions through interdisciplinary panels, workshops, and a reading by poet Cecily Parks. Panel topics include Critical Cartography, African American Environmentalisms, and Indigenous Environmental Justice. 
 

For more information, visit the official event page

Political Thinking at the Margins

April 6, 2017

1 West Range, Hotel A | 2:00 pm

Political Thinking at the Margins

April 6, 2017

1 West Range, Hotel A | 2:00 pm

April 6-7, 2017

University of Virginia

 

THIS TWO DAY CONFERENCE brings together established and emerging scholars of colonialism, settler-colonialism, and race for a discussion of law, violence, borders, war, property, sovereignty, the global, and the humanities in different contexts around the globe. While our approach is interdisciplinary and comparative, we acknowledge challenges to Western canons and to the “comparative” turn in the humanities; and we are also mindful that comparison is a political activity that may reinforce existing distinctions between West and non-West, settler and native, white and non-white, civilized and uncivilized, and so forth. Accordingly, the conference seeks to elicit connections and understand the disconnections between bodies of thought that have, in contemporary academic formations, remained distinct. Visit the official website for more information.

 

Each panel will take place at the Center for Global Inquiry + Innovation, 1 West Range, Hotel A. The Keynote Address will be at Nau Hall, 101.

 

Sponsored by
The Buckner W. Clay Endowment for the Humanities
The Institute of the Humanities and Global Culture
The Page-Barbour Foundation
The Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation
and the Department of Politics

The Global/Contemporary Symposium

March 31, 2017

Nau 101 | 10:30 am - 7:30 pm

The Global/Contemporary Symposium

March 31, 2017

Nau 101 | 10:30 am - 7:30 pm

What is gained and what is lost, what is revealed and what is obscured by understanding the moment in which we live as global? This one-day symposium at the University of Virginia will explore the alignment of two dominant terms within the academy, the “contemporary” and the “global,” to question, challenge, and expand the relationship between them. We hope to interrogate the ways in which the phenomena that draw the attention of scholars of the contemporary—the rise of digital media, an increasingly inter- and supra-national economy, technologies of migration and communication, far-reaching environmental degradation, and political unrest—have become the prominent reference points for writing about our current moment. While the time in which we live is inarguably global, this schema can obscure alternate ones and allow us to forget that the characteristics marking our era as “global” have long and complex histories of their own. Inviting a vibrant group of scholars, we hope that this symposium might lead to longer-term collaborations and an intellectual community that will supplement the ties we hold to our own departments and institutions—indeed, to create a wider-reaching and even global network of discourse surrounding this subject. For more information, visit the Global/Contemporary Symposium website.

Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

March 30, 2017

Old Cabell Hall | 8:00 pm

Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

March 30, 2017

Old Cabell Hall | 8:00 pm

Click here for tickets ($12 general / free for students)

 

A series of curricular, co-curricular, creative, and academic events around a movie screening of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc presented with live music by the Orlando Consort. Visit the main page for a full schedule of activities. 
 

“Voices Appeared: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc and the Orlando Consort” is a live multimedia performance and historical reconstruction of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc. “Voices Appeared” features live musical accompaniment to the film, curated and performed by the Orlando Consort. Inspired by Joan of Arc’s gnomic description of angels appearing before her, “Voices Appeared” reconciles the silent film medium with Joan’s narrative experience of hearing voices. The project uses vocal works from the early part of the fifteenth century, when Joan was alive and active, providing historical context as well as musical commentary on her psyche while in captivity, especially as a gender and religious minority figure.
 

Cited as “simultaneously ravishing and reverential” by the Los Angeles Times and “enthralling” by The London Evening Standard, the Orlando Consort, formed in 1988 by the Early Music Network of Great Britain, is one of Europe’s most expert and consistently challenging groups performing repertoire from the years 1050 to 1550. Their work successfully combines captivating entertainment and fresh scholarly insight. The unique imagination and originality of their programming, together with their superb vocal skills, has marked the Consort out as the outstanding leaders of their field. More infomation at http://www.orlandoconsort.com/
 

 

"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

March 28, 2017

Nau 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

March 28, 2017

Nau 101 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

This talk will explore the demands of criticism at the present moment, assessing a number of recent calls for new methods, including those that seek to promote a new mood for criticism. The arguments of my recent book, Bleak Liberalism, will be discussed in relation to these larger debates, and a case will be made for the importance of the tradition of normative critical theory to the challenges we face both inside and outside the academy.  
 

Biography

 

Amanda Anderson joined the Brown faculty in 2012 as the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English and became Director of the Cogut Center for the Humanities in 2015. She is a literary scholar and theorist who has written on nineteenth-century literature and culture as well as on contemporary debates in the humanities. Her books include Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (Princeton, 2006), The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (Princeton, 2001), and Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture (Cornell, 1993).  From 2008-2014, she served as the director of an interdisciplinary summer institute, the School of Criticism and Theory, which is hosted by Cornell University. Prior to joining the Brown faculty, she taught at Johns Hopkins University, where she served as department chair from 2003-2009.

 

In her latest work, Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), Professor Anderson asks: Why is liberalism so often dismissed by thinkers from both the left and the right? To those calling for wholesale transformation or claiming a monopoly on “realistic” conceptions of humanity, liberalism’s assured progressivism can seem hard to swallow. Bleak Liberalism makes the case for a renewed understanding of the liberal tradition, showing that it is much more attuned to the complexity of political life than conventional accounts have acknowledged.

Amanda Anderson examines canonical works of high realism, political novels from England and the United States, and modernist works to argue that liberalism has engaged sober and even stark views of historical development, political dynamics, and human and social psychology. From Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Hard Times to E. M. Forster’s Howards End to Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook, this literature demonstrates that liberalism has inventive ways of balancing sociological critique and moral aspiration. A deft blend of intellectual history and literary analysis, Bleak Liberalism reveals a richer understanding of one of the most important political ideologies of the modern era.

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