University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

News

A Conversation with Amitav Ghosh on The Great Derangement

April 27, 2017

A Conversation with Amitav Ghosh on The Great Derangement

April 27, 2017

In this evening event, Distinguished Writer-in-Residence Amitav Ghosh will speak about his newest book, The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable (2016). This event will include a brief conversation between Ghosh and Professor Debjani Ganguli, Director of Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, a public Q&A, and a reception following the event.

Here's how Chicago UP describes the book: "Are we deranged? The acclaimed Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh argues that future generations may well think so. How else to explain our imaginative failure in the face of global warming? In his first major book of nonfiction since In an Antique Land, Ghosh examines our inability—at the level of literature, history, and politics—to grasp the scale and violence of climate change."

Read more about The Great Derangment.

Amitav Ghosh Public Lecture - From Bombay to Canton and Back: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route

April 26, 2017

Amitav Ghosh Public Lecture - From Bombay to Canton and Back: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route

April 26, 2017

Public Lecture, 4.30pm-6.00pm
Nau Hall 101

From Bombay to Canton: Traveling the Indian Ocean Opium Route 

Guangzhou (also known as Canton) is one of the world’s great cosmopolitan entrepots. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, it was through this city, and its environs, that opium was funneled into China by British, American and Indian merchants. This trade was to have an enormous impact , not just  on China but the whole world: its influence on India was especially significant, for the subcontinent was the world's leading opium-producing region under the British Raj.  This talk explores Guangzhou as an Indian trader might have seen it in the 19th century.

"Language at the Bar: James Joyce, Myles Joyce and the 1882 Maamtrasna Murders (Galway, Ireland) Revisited," Prof. Margaret Kelleher Public Lecture

April 20, 2017

"Language at the Bar: James Joyce, Myles Joyce and the 1882 Maamtrasna Murders (Galway, Ireland) Revisited," Prof. Margaret Kelleher Public Lecture

April 20, 2017

Biography

 

Professor Margaret Kelleher was awarded the Chair of Anglo-Irish Literature and Drama in 2012.  For the previous five years, she was founding director of An Foras Feasa: the Institute for Research in Irish Historical and Cultural Traditions, at NUI Maynooth. Her books include The Feminization of Famine (published by Duke UP and Cork UP, 1997) and the landmark publication The Cambridge History of Irish Literature (2006), co-edited with Philip O¿Leary. She was a contributing editor to Field Day Anthology Volumes 4 and 5, and editor of the special issue on the Irish Literary Revival forIrish University Review (2003). Her primary research interests include nineteenth-century literature, famine literature, women¿s writings, cultural history, and the historical relationship between literature in English and Irish. 
 

She was awarded an IRCHSS Senior Project Fellowship in 2011 to create an electronic version of the Loebers' Guide to Irish Fiction (operative from November 2012 at http://www.lgif.ie) and has worked with colleagues in An Foras Feasa on a number of groundbreaking digital humanities projects. She was Principal Investigator (with John Keating) of the PRTLI 4 funded project 'Humanities, Technology and Innovation" 2007-2011 (grant award ¿5.8 m) and NUI Maynooth's Principal Investigator from 2011-2012 for the PRTLI 5 funded Digital Arts and Humanities PhD programme (grant award ¿750,000). Her current research project is a study of bilingual culture in nineteenth-century Ireland.
 

A leading advocate for Irish studies internationally, Professor Kelleher is Chairperson of the International Association for the Study of Irish Literatures, Chair of the Irish Film Institute and a member of the Humanities Committee of Science Europe.  Educated at University College Cork and Boston College, she has been visiting Professor at Concordia University Montreal, University of São Paulo, Boston College and Beijing Foreign Studies University, and was recently awarded a visiting fellowship at St John's College, Cambridge. She is Director of the MA in Anglo-Irish Literature in the School of English, Drama and Film.

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Carmen Lamas, Christian McMillen, Enrico Cesaretti)

April 14, 2017

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Carmen Lamas, Christian McMillen, Enrico Cesaretti)

April 14, 2017

"Social Movements," Prof. Michael Hardt Public Lecture

April 11, 2017

"Social Movements," Prof. Michael Hardt Public Lecture

April 11, 2017

Time: 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Location: Nau Hall 101

Biography
 

Michael Hardt is Professor of Literature in the Department of Romance Studies at Duke University. His writings explore the new forms of domination in the contemporary world as well as the social movements and other forces of liberation that resist them. In the Empire trilogy -- Empire (2000), Multitude (2004), and Commonwealth (2009) -- he and Antonio Negri investigate the political, legal, economic, and social aspects of globalization. They also study the political and economic alternatives that could lead to a more democratic world. Their pamphlet Declaration (2012) attempts to articulate the significance of the encampments and occupations that began in 2011, from Tahrir Square to Zuccotti Park, and to recognize the primary challenges faced by emerging democratic social movements today. 

"Border-Thinking," Prof. Sandro Mezzadra Public Lecture

April 10, 2017

"Border-Thinking," Prof. Sandro Mezzadra Public Lecture

April 10, 2017

Time: 5:00 - 6:00 pm
Location: Nau 101

Biography 

 

Sandro Mezzadra teaches political theory at the University of Bologna. In the last decade his work has centered on the relations between globalization, migration and capitalism as well as on postcolonial criticism. He is an active participant in the ‘post-workerist’ debates and one of the founders of the website www.euronomade.info. Among his books: Diritto di fuga. Migrazioni, cittadinanza, globalizzazione (“The right to escape: Migration, citizenship, globalization”, ombre corte, 2006), La condizione postcoloniale. Storia e politica nel presente globale (“The postcolonial condition: History and politics in the global present”, ombre corte, 2008) and Nei cantieri marxiani. Il soggetto e la sua produzione (“In the Marxian Workshops. The Subject and its Production”, Manifestolibri, 2014). With Brett Neilson he is the author of Border as Method, or, the Multiplication of Labor (Duke University Press, 2013).

Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

April 8, 2017

Beyond Representation: Creative & Critical Practice in the Environmental Humanities

April 8, 2017

For more information, visit the official event page

Political Thinking at the Margins

April 6, 2017

Political Thinking at the Margins

April 6, 2017

Conference Conveners: Lawrie Balfour, Murad Idris, Sandhya Shukla 

 

Funded by the Clay Foundation, the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, the Page-Barbour Foundation, the Center for Global Innovation and Inquiry, and the Department of Politics

 

Speakers: 
Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers), Adom Getachew (University of Chicago), Barnor Hesse (Northwestern), Juliet Hooker (University of Texas-Austin), Desmond Jagmohan (Princeton), Hagar Kotef (SOAS), Aishwary Kumar (Stanford), Joseph Massad (Columbia), Robert Nichols (University of Minnesota), Dan-el Padilla Peralta (Princeton), Aziz Rana (Cornell), Andrew Sartori (NYU), Alicia Schmidt-Camacho (Yale), Chris Taylor (University of Chicago), and Megan Thomas (University of California-Santa Cruz); and Vijay Prashad (Trinity) will deliver a keynote address on the opening night.
 

The Global/Contemporary Symposium

March 31, 2017

The Global/Contemporary Symposium

March 31, 2017

What is gained and what is lost, what is revealed and what is obscured by understanding the moment in which we live as global? This one-day symposium at the University of Virginia will explore the alignment of two dominant terms within the academy, the “contemporary” and the “global,” to question, challenge, and expand the relationship between them. We hope to interrogate the ways in which the phenomena that draw the attention of scholars of the contemporary—the rise of digital media, an increasingly inter- and supra-national economy, technologies of migration and communication, far-reaching environmental degradation, and political unrest—have become the prominent reference points for writing about our current moment. While the time in which we live is inarguably global, this schema can obscure alternate ones and allow us to forget that the characteristics marking our era as “global” have long and complex histories of their own. Inviting a vibrant group of scholars, we hope that this symposium might lead to longer-term collaborations and an intellectual community that will supplement the ties we hold to our own departments and institutions—indeed, to create a wider-reaching and even global network of discourse surrounding this subject. For more information, visit the Global/Contemporary Symposium website.

Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

March 30, 2017

Joan of Arc/Afterlives Symposium

March 30, 2017

Click here for tickets ($12 general / free for students)

 

A series of curricular, co-curricular, creative, and academic events around a movie screening of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc presented with live music by the Orlando Consort. Visit the main page for a full schedule of activities. 
 

Voices Appeared: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc and the Orlando Consort

“Voices Appeared: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc and the Orlando Consort” is a live multimedia performance and historical reconstruction of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 silent film La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc. “Voices Appeared” features live musical accompaniment to the film, curated and performed by the Orlando Consort. Inspired by Joan of Arc’s gnomic description of angels appearing before her, “Voices Appeared” reconciles the silent film medium with Joan’s narrative experience of hearing voices. The project uses vocal works from the early part of the fifteenth century, when Joan was alive and active, providing historical context as well as musical commentary on her psyche while in captivity, especially as a gender and religious minority figure.
 

Cited as “simultaneously ravishing and reverential” by the Los Angeles Times and “enthralling” by The London Evening Standard, the Orlando Consort, formed in 1988 by the Early Music Network of Great Britain, is one of Europe’s most expert and consistently challenging groups performing repertoire from the years 1050 to 1550. Their work successfully combines captivating entertainment and fresh scholarly insight. The unique imagination and originality of their programming, together with their superb vocal skills, has marked the Consort out as the outstanding leaders of their field. More infomation at http://www.orlandoconsort.com/
 

 

"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

March 28, 2017

"Bleak Liberalism and the Question of Therapeutic Criticism," Prof. Amanda Anderson Public Lecture

March 28, 2017

This talk will explore the demands of criticism at the present moment, assessing a number of recent calls for new methods, including those that seek to promote a new mood for criticism. The arguments of my recent book, Bleak Liberalism, will be discussed in relation to these larger debates, and a case will be made for the importance of the tradition of normative critical theory to the challenges we face both inside and outside the academy.  
 

Biography

 

Amanda Anderson joined the Brown faculty in 2012 as the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English and became Director of the Cogut Center for the Humanities in 2015. She is a literary scholar and theorist who has written on nineteenth-century literature and culture as well as on contemporary debates in the humanities. Her books include Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (Princeton, 2006), The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (Princeton, 2001), and Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture (Cornell, 1993).  From 2008-2014, she served as the director of an interdisciplinary summer institute, the School of Criticism and Theory, which is hosted by Cornell University. Prior to joining the Brown faculty, she taught at Johns Hopkins University, where she served as department chair from 2003-2009.

 

In her latest work, Bleak Liberalism (Chicago, 2016), Professor Anderson asks: Why is liberalism so often dismissed by thinkers from both the left and the right? To those calling for wholesale transformation or claiming a monopoly on “realistic” conceptions of humanity, liberalism’s assured progressivism can seem hard to swallow. Bleak Liberalism makes the case for a renewed understanding of the liberal tradition, showing that it is much more attuned to the complexity of political life than conventional accounts have acknowledged.

Amanda Anderson examines canonical works of high realism, political novels from England and the United States, and modernist works to argue that liberalism has engaged sober and even stark views of historical development, political dynamics, and human and social psychology. From Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Hard Times to E. M. Forster’s Howards End to Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook, this literature demonstrates that liberalism has inventive ways of balancing sociological critique and moral aspiration. A deft blend of intellectual history and literary analysis, Bleak Liberalism reveals a richer understanding of one of the most important political ideologies of the modern era.

Global History of Black Girlhood Conference

March 17, 2017

Global History of Black Girlhood Conference

March 17, 2017

The Global History of Black Girlhood Conference will gather over forty scholars, artists and activists to present recent research, creative works, and political organizing that places the emerging field of black girls' history within a global framework. Presentations will focus on black girls' pasts in Africa, Europe, and the Americas, addressing themes including kinship, bondage, activism, justice, pleasure, play, and representation. The conference will include a keynote panel on “Global Black Girl Politics” and a reading by Tayari Jones from her novel Silver Sparrow. For more information on the conference please contact globalblackgirlhood@gmail.com. For more on the History of Black Girlhood Network, please visit https://historyofblackgirlhood.org

"What is a Poem?" Inaugural Symposium of the Center for Poetry and Poetics

March 17, 2017

"What is a Poem?" Inaugural Symposium of the Center for Poetry and Poetics

March 17, 2017

Is a poem more like a song or a shipping container? What was a poem in the seventeenth century, and what is it in the digital age? Why poetry, anyway? Join our world-class speakers as they explore these and other questions. The symposium will conclude with a conversation with former US Poet Laureate Rita Dove. Visit the Center for Poetry & Poetics website for more information. 

 

"WHAT IS A POEM?" 

Friday, March 17, 2017

The Rotunda Dome Room

10am-5pm

 

10am - Noon - Panel 1
     Roland Greene
         “Apollo Barroco: What Was a Poem in the Seventeenth Century?” 
     Anjali Nerlekar
         “The Poem and the Ocean-Encircled Earth" 
     Marjorie Perloff
         “Reading the Verses Backward: Poetry for the Digital Age”      

 

1:30pm - 3:30pm - Panel 2
     Stephen Burt
          "Shipping Containers"
     Nikki Skillman
          "The Song of the Harpies"
     Don Share
          "Why Poetry"

 

4:00pm - 5:00pm – A Conversation with Rita Dove

"Unseen City: Travelling Psychoanalysis and the Urban Poor," Prof. Ankhi Mukherjee, Oxford University

March 13, 2017

"Unseen City: Travelling Psychoanalysis and the Urban Poor," Prof. Ankhi Mukherjee, Oxford University

March 13, 2017

This lecture examines the institution of Freudian psychoanalysis in an international frame, with reference to its inadequate engagement with urban poverty, as seen in the specific context of global cities in India. Using case studies, it will discuss literary and aesthetic representations of poverty in relation to India's psychoanalytic and psychiatric culture, as that culture is manifested in public attitudes toward the psychic life of the poor. The lecture presents research from the India chapter of Professor Mukherjee's third monograph, The Psychic Life of the Poor: A City Unseen in Mumbai, London, and New York.

 

Biography

Ankhi Mukherjee is Professor of English and World Literatures and a Fellow of Wadham College. Her first book is Aesthetic Hysteria: The Great Neurosis in Victorian Melodrama and Contemporary Fiction (Routledge, 2007). Her second monograph, What is a Classic? Postcolonial Rewriting and Invention of the Canon, published by Stanford University Press in 2014, won the British Academy Rose Mary Crawshay Prize in English Literature in 2015. Mukherjee has published on a wide range of topics in PMLA, MLQ, Contemporary Literature, Paragraph, Parallax and other peer-reviewed journals, and has co-edited  A Concise Companion to Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Culture (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014). She is at work on two projects: her third monograph, The Psychic Life of the Poor: A City Unseen in Mumbai, London, and New York, which examines the relationship between psychoanalysis, race, and poverty in the context of global cities, and a collaborative volume, After Lacan, which she is editing for Cambridge University Press.

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Sheila Crane, Amanda Phillips, Douglas Fordham)

March 3, 2017

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Sheila Crane, Amanda Phillips, Douglas Fordham)

March 3, 2017

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday March 3, 2017

10.00am-1.30pm

142 Wilson Hall

 

10:00 am - 10:45 am

Sheila Crane, Associate Professor, School of Architecture

"Towards a Non-Aligned Architectural Theory: Notes from the Maghrib"

 

10:45 am - 11:30 am

Amanda Phillips, Assistant Professor, Department of Art

"Between the Seas: Ottoman Textiles in the Eighteenth Century"

 

11:30 am - 12:15 pm

Douglas Fordham, Associate Professor, Department of Art

"Aquatint Empires: Medium and Message in Georgian Book Illustration relating to Asia and Africa"

 

12:15 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch

Graham Harman workshop and lecture (with NLH)

February 16, 2017

Graham Harman workshop and lecture (with NLH)

February 16, 2017

Professor Harman is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at SCI-Arc in Los Angeles and the founder of object-oriented ontology as well as a leading commentator on the work of Bruno Latour. His many books include Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects, Toward Speculative Realism, Prince of Networks: Bruno Latour and Metaphysics, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy, and Immaterialism.

 

Feb 16th at 5pm: Graham Harman will give a lecture “On Knowledge in the Arts and Taste in the Sciences" in Campbell 158 in the Architecture School. (Abstract provided below.)

 

Feb 17th from 10am-12pm: Harman will participate in a “seminar on formalism” intended mainly for graduate students (others are also welcome) in Wilson 142. If you intend to attend the seminar, please read Harman’s new book Dante’s Broken Hammer pp. 149-249.

 

“On Knowledge in the Arts and Taste in the Sciences”

 

In the 2012 essay “The Third Table,” I claimed that objects are irreducible to knowledge of any sort, whether it be knowledge of what a thing is made of or knowledge of what it does. I claimed further that the arts and design are well aware that they produce something other than knowledge, and that philosophy belongs on this side of the fence as well: Socrates’ constant assertions that he knows nothing are not just playful irony, but a direct statement of what philosophy really is. At the same time, I argued that what makes science a form of knowledge is its willingness to paraphrase things in terms of properties that truly belong to them. While this distinction between the arts and the sciences generally holds, we must also consider those cases in which art does transmit knowledge and in which science does yield something like an aesthetic experience. How does this recognition transform the basic concepts developed in “The Third Table”?

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Camilla Fojas, Mary Kuhn, Jack Chen, Hanadi Al-Samman)

February 10, 2017

Mellon Fellows Symposium (with Camilla Fojas, Mary Kuhn, Jack Chen, Hanadi Al-Samman)

February 10, 2017

IHGC Presents 

Mellon Fellows Symposium

Friday February 10, 2017

9.30am-1.30pm

142 Wilson Hall

 

9:30 am - 10:15 am

Hanadi Al-Samman, Associate Professor, Department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures 

"Queering the Arab Closet"

 

10:15 am - 11:00 am

Jack Chen, Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures, & Cultures
"Towards a Literary History of Information in Traditional China"

 

11:00 am - 11:45 am

Camilla Fojas, Associate Professor, Department of Media Studies
"Techno-Domestics, Telecommunications, and Surveillance across the American Pacific"

 

11:45 am - 12:30 pm

Mary Kuhn, Assistant Professor, Department of English
"'The vulgar short leaved pine': Forest Industries and the U.S. Literary Landscape in the Late-19th Century”

Post-Humanism in the Anthropocene - IHGC Mellon Symposium

December 2, 2016

Post-Humanism in the Anthropocene - IHGC Mellon Symposium

December 2, 2016

142 Wilson Hall

 

Schedule of Events:

9.00 a.m.                      
Coffee

9.30 a.m.                      
Welcome and Introduction – Enrico Cesaretti

9.45 – 11.00 a.m.          
Panel 1: Questioning Boundaries
Massimo Lollini (Dept. of Romance Languages, University of Oregon), “The Ancient Roots of a Non-Anthropocentric Philosophy: A Pythagorean Perspective”
Monica Seger (Dept. of Modern Languages - Italian, College of William & Mary), “Walking the Land: Toxicity, Transcorporeality and Phytoremediation in Southern Italy”
Louise Westling (Dept. of English and Environmental Studies, University of Oregon), “Merleau-Ponty's Ecophenomenology and Human Enmeshment in the Semiosphere”

11.15 – 12.30 p.m.         
Panel 2: Energies, Ecologies, Matters
Karen Pinkus (Dept. of Italian & Comp. Literature, Cornell University), “Thinking Decarbonization with Italian Autonomia”
Elena Past (Dept. of Classics and Italian, Wayne State University), “Thinking on Foot in the Hydrocarbon Sublime: Sorrentino’s Petrocultures”
Heather Sullivan (Dept. of German & Comp. Literature, Trinity University, “Petro-Texts and Material Ecocriticism”

12.30 – 13.45 p.m.         
Lunch

14.00 – 15.15 p.m.         
Panel 3: Mediterranean Narratives Between Bios and Zoe
Federico Luisetti (Dept. of Romance Studies - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), “Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Political Animism”
Damiano Benvegnù (Dept. of French & Italian, Dartmouth College) “How Much Animal There Is in Us: Primo Levi's Animal Testimony”
Pasquale Verdicchio (Dept. of Literature – Italian & Comp. Lit. UCSD), “This Nostrum That is Neither Sea nor Remedy: Mediterranean Re-visions”

"Global South: A Colloquium" - presented by the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, November 16-19, 2016

November 16, 2016

"Global South: A Colloquium" - presented by the Institute of the Humanities and Global Cultures, November 16-19, 2016

November 16, 2016

Keynote Speakers

"Afro-Atlantic Genealogies of the Global South
Laurent Dubois (History and Romance Studies, Duke University)
Wednesday, November 16, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Nau Hall 101

Plenary Panel: "Southern Theory"
Juan Obarrio (Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University), Debjani Ganguly (English, University of Virginia), and Laurent Dubois (History and Romance Studies, Duke University)
Moderated by Ian Baucom (Buckner W. Clay Dean of Arts & Sciences, University of Virginia)
Thursday, November 17, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Nau Hall 101

"Poetry, the Global South, and the Migration of Form"
Jahan Ramazani (University of Virginia)
Friday, November 18, 4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
New Cabell Hall 236

"Where Next? The Global South Out West," Tsitsi Jaji (English, Duke University)
Saturday, November 19, 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
New Cabell Hall 236

Historically, the idea of the ‘Global South’ can be traced to the Brandt Report of 1980, which posited a divide between countries of the North and South according to technological development, GDP, and standard of living. A cultural genealogy of the term stretches back even further to the 1955 Africa-Asia Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, which inaugurated ‘Third World’ collaborations, decolonization movements, and heralded a sustained engagement with the postcolonial as an historical epoch.

Notwithstanding these specific genealogies, ‘Global South’ today appears as an unsettled and unsettling frame from which to contemplate the world. Some think of it as a post-Cold War era replacement for the ‘Third World’ (and so primarily covering Africa, Latin America, South and Southeast Asia, but not Europe, America and the Mediterranean worlds), while others use it synonymously with the idea of underdevelopment and deprivation wherever these are found. Yet others see it as a ‘frontier in the unfolding history of neoliberal capitalism’ and a window from which to grasp the conditions of intelligibility of our global present: historical, cultural, aesthetic, political, environmental, biomedical and technological. The antinomy with the more privileged Global North persists both in the domain of political economy and in culturalist perceptions of a decolonial reinvention and invigoration of non-Western lifeworlds.

As will be obvious from the above, the idea of the ‘Global South’ has varied inflections across the disciplines. An economist’s understanding of it does not converge with that of a historian or a literary scholar or even that of a media specialist. At the same time, the paradigmatic force of the term is not in doubt, one that makes intelligible larger constellations of meaning beyond the specific historicity of its origins in a postcolonial and post-Cold War world. The Global South currently exists at the confluence of and tension between systems of knowledge and ways of conceptualizing space, habitations, cultures, aesthetics and political economy. Our colloquium will explore the many dimensions of this concept – philosophical, historical, political, spatial and aesthetic - as they inform contemporary scholarship. 

"Culture at Hand: The Anthropology of Creativity and the Making of a Divine Craftsman in India" by IHGC visiting scholar Prof. Kirin Narayan, Australian National University (with UVA Anthropology Dept); 10:00AM-11:30AM, New Cabell 236

November 11, 2016

"Culture at Hand: The Anthropology of Creativity and the Making of a Divine Craftsman in India" by IHGC visiting scholar Prof. Kirin Narayan, Australian National University (with UVA Anthropology Dept); 10:00AM-11:30AM, New Cabell 236

November 11, 2016

Biography

Kirin Narayan was born in India to an American mother and Indian father, and moved to the United States to attend college. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California—Berkeley. Her first book, Storytellers, Saints and Scoundrels: Folk Narrative in Hindu Religious Teaching (1989), won the first Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing from the American Anthropological Association and was co-winner of the Elsie Clews Prize for Folklore from the American Folklore Society. Her novel Love, Stars and All That (1994) was included in the Barnes and Nobles Discover Great New Writers program. In the course of researching women’s oral traditions in Kangra, Northwest Himalayas, she collaborated with Urmila Devi Sood to bring together a book of tales with discussions of their meaning and ethnographic context in Mondays on the Dark Night of the Moon: Himalayan Foothill Folktales (1997). An interest in family stories and diasporic experience inspired  My Family and Other Saints (2007). Teaching ethnographic writing led her to compose Alive in the Writing: Crafting Ethnography in the Company of Chekhov (2012), that includes galvanizing extracts, prompts and writing exercises. Her forthcoming book, Everyday Creativity: Singing Goddesses of the Himalayan Foothills explores creativity and well-being among women singers in Kangra, and will be released by the University of Chicago Press in 2016.

Kirin Narayan has received support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Institute of Indian Studies, the School of American Research, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the University of Wisconsin Institute for Research in the Humanities, and the University of Wisconsin Graduate School. She received a Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Wisconsin in 2011. Since 2001, she has served as an editor for the Series in Contemporary Ethnography at the University of Pennsylvania Press. She currently serves on the Committee of Selection for the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/narayan-k

"Companionable Objects, Companionable Conscience: Politics, Cover up, and Disclosure in an Indonesian Art Show" by IHGC visiting scholar, Prof. Ken George, Australian National University (with UVA's Asia Institute), 4:30PM - 6:00PM, Rouss 410

November 10, 2016

"Companionable Objects, Companionable Conscience: Politics, Cover up, and Disclosure in an Indonesian Art Show" by IHGC visiting scholar, Prof. Ken George, Australian National University (with UVA's Asia Institute), 4:30PM - 6:00PM, Rouss 410

November 10, 2016

 

Ken joined the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific in 2013 as Professor of Anthropology and Director of the School of Culture, History and Language, having served previously at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harvard University and the University of Oregon.  He is a specialist on Southeast Asia and a Past Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies (2005-2008).  His ethnographic research in Indonesia has focused on the cultural politics of minority ancestral religions (1982-1992), and more recently (1994-2008), on a long-term collaboration with painter A. D. Pirous, exploring the aesthetic, ethical, and political ambitions shaping Islamic art and art publics in that country.  Ken has been the recipient of major postdoctoral fieldwork fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and the Aga Khan Trust for Culture.  His fellowships for writing and study include awards from the National Endowment of the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.   His current research projects are two:  The first looks at the production of “companionable objects and “companionable conscience” in an effort to link artworks to ethics, affect, language, and public culture.  Another involves a comparative look at early postcolonial artists in Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and India, and aims at theoretical and disciplinary issues surrounding public culture and the anthropology of art and visual culture.

https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/george-k

"Knowing the World through Objects in the Eighteenth Century" - presented by IHGC's Mellon Fellows in Art History, Douglas Fordham & Amanda Phillips, and visiting scholars. Harrison's Small Library Auditorium, 9:00AM - 12:30PM

November 4, 2016

"Knowing the World through Objects in the Eighteenth Century" - presented by IHGC's Mellon Fellows in Art History, Douglas Fordham & Amanda Phillips, and visiting scholars. Harrison's Small Library Auditorium, 9:00AM - 12:30PM

November 4, 2016

 
Knowing the World through Objects in the Eighteenth Century
Friday, November 4, 9:00AM – 12:30PM
Harrison Small Auditorium at UVa
 
Organizers:  Amanda Phillips and Douglas Fordham
Visiting Scholars:  Michael Yonan (Associate Professor, Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century European Art, Director of Graduate Studies, University of Missouri); Maia Nuku (Evelyn A. J. Hall and John A. Friede Associate Curaotr for Oceanic Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art)
 
How was knowledge of the world transmitted through objects in the long eighteenth century? Histories of material culture, printed images, commodities, and exchange have grown dramatically in the last few decades yielding surprising insights about the past not found in the textual record. This half-day symposium questions the role of objects as evidence and explores methods and approaches that might cut across disciplines as we analyze intercultural exchange in the eighteenth century. 

Latin American Studies Conference, October 13-14, 2016

October 13, 2016

Latin American Studies Conference, October 13-14, 2016

October 13, 2016

IHGC Mellon Fellows Symposium w/Fahad Bishara and Maya Boutaghou. Wilson Hall 142, 10:00AM - 12:30PM.

October 7, 2016

IHGC Mellon Fellows Symposium w/Fahad Bishara and Maya Boutaghou. Wilson Hall 142, 10:00AM - 12:30PM.

October 7, 2016

IHGC Presents 
Mellon Fellows Symposium
October 7, 2016 - Friday
10.00am-12.30pm
142 Wilson Hall
 
10.00 -11.00 am 
Fahad Bishara, Assistant Professor, Corcoran Department of History 
"Monsoon Travelers: Dhows and the Trading Worlds of the Western Indian Ocean, c. 1800-1960."
 
11.00am -12.00 noon
Maya Boutaghou, Assistant Professor, Department of French
“Remapping Francophone Literatures and Cultures through a Global South Perspective: Provincializing France
 
12.00-12.30: General Discussion
12.30-1.00pm: Lunch
 
Bios:
Fahad Ahmad Bishara’s research interests lie in the fields of legal history and the history of capitalism – primarily in the Islamic world, but also beyond it. His current research traces the legal transformation of the Western Indian Ocean through the Arab and Indian settlement and commercialization of the East African coast during the nineteenth century. His book, A Sea of Debt: Law and Economic Life in the Western Indian Ocean, 1780-1940 is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. His next project is a microhistory, exploring the dhow trade in the Indian Ocean during the early twentieth century through logbooks left behind by Kuwaiti sea captains (nakhodas). He received his Ph.D. in History from Duke University in 2012, and holds an M.A. in Arab Gulf Studies from the University of Exeter. His research has been supported by the Social Science Research Council and the American Council of Learned Societies, and he is an alumnus of the Hurst Summer Institute in Legal History.
 
Maya Boutaghou graduated from Université de Limoges in Comparative Literature. From 2008 to 2010, she was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California Los Angeles in the Center for Cultures in Transnational Perspective. She is the author of Occidentalismes : Romans historiques postcoloniaux et identités nationales au dix-neuvième siècle (Paris, Honoré Champion, 2016). Occidentalismes offers a new approach to the fields of comparative literature and postcolonial studies with poetical and textual perspectives on postcolonial literatures and cultural identity construction in 19th century (Australia, Bengal, Egypt, Mexico). Her second book focuses on plurilingual women writers in postcolonial contexts (Egypt, Bengal, Mauritius, and Algeria). She publishes extensively in comparative literature, Francophone, Arabic, and Anglophone postcolonial studies (Expressions Maghrébines, French Studies, International Journal of Francophone Studies, Dalhousie French Studies, Comparative Literary Studies). She recently guest-edited a special issue for l’Esprit créateur, « The Algerian War of Independence and its Legacy in Algeria, France and Beyond », Winter 2014, and a forthcoming book, Fictions et représentations de la guerre algérienne d’indépendance (Garnier, 2016). At UVa she will extend her major areas of expertise within postcolonial literatures and cultures as an IHGC Fellow in the Global South Initiative supported by the Mellon Foundation.

Prof Raffaele Laudani presents: "UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy in Global Humanities & Critical Theory"

September 9, 2016

Prof Raffaele Laudani presents: "UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy in Global Humanities & Critical Theory"

September 9, 2016

Professor Raffaele Laudani, Director of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy in Global Humanities and Critical Theory, in the U.S. to visit Duke and UVA, will be discussing this collaboration between the three universities, the program and its summer school, which has now matured into a year-round Academy in Global Humanities, as well as the various opportunities available. We encourage you to make every effort to attend on Friday, September 9, 10:30AM-12:00PM, in Nau Hall 342.

 

About Raffaele Laudani:

Raffaele Laudani is Director of the UVA-Duke-Bologna Academy in Global Humanities & Critical Theory, and Associate Professor in the Department of History and Human Cultures at the University of Bologna, where he teaches the History of Political Thought and Atlantic Studies. Prof. Laudani graduated in Political Science in 1998 at the University of Bologna and earned in 2003 a PhD in History of Political Thought and Political Institutions at the University of Turin and in Philosophy and History of Ideas at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis. His research focuses on the history of modern and contemporary political thought. He has published several volumes and essays on the Frankfurt School, globalization, disobedience, African-American abolitionism. He is the editor of the Italian edition of Herbert Marcuse's uncollected papers. At the moment he is studying the Atlantic dimension of modern political thought. He has participated and organized several international meetings and seminars and participated in numerous collective national research projects. He created and edits the book series "Marcusiana" (Manifestolibri). He is member of the editorial board of the journals Filosofia politica and Storicamente, among others.  Since 2006, he is the director of the Bologna International Committee for the Cartography and Analysis of Contemporary World and of its website (www.cartografareilpresente.org). He was political columnist of the newspaper L'Alto Adige. He is a contributor for several cultural and political newspapers, such as Le Monde diplomatique and il manifesto. Among his recent works are: Politica come movimento. Il pensiero di Herbert Marcuse (Il Mulino, 2005); Disobbedienza (Il Mulino, 2011), Disobedience in Western Political Thought:  A Genealogy (Cambridge University Press, 2013); Secrets Reports on Nazi Germany: The Frankfurt School Contribution to the War Effort (Princeton University Press, 2013). https://www.unibo.it/sitoweb/raffaele.laudani/cv-en

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