University of Virginia, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Sponsored Courses

Spring 2015

How to Survive an Apocalypse

Brandon Walsh and Eliza Fox

This course examines post-apocalyptic scenarios from film, texts, and graphic narratives around the turn of the twenty-first century. Discussions of how alternative futures shape and elaborate concerns of the present will form the crux of our discussions, which will include such topics as zombie apocalypse juvenile delinquency, nuclear war and superhero mythology, and technological terror.

Garden as Metaphor and Practice

Barbara Bernstein

Creating a garden offers the solace and attention sorely needed in times of transition and healing. In addition, planting, nurturing and cultivating are also metaphors of how ideas are generated and distributed. This course offers students the rewards of experiencing both: the physical manifestation of transformation by sowing plants along with its symbolic representations through culture: language, images, music, etc.

Fall 2014

Viewing the Global South

Audrey Golden

What can film and television teach us about violence and resistance in other parts of the world? Do these popular mediums have something to say about how we understand recent moments in history? In the 1980s, the region commonly known as the “Global South” experienced an unprecedented level of localized violence. Each week we’ll focus on a place and a work of cinema, watching the films while reading excerpts from literature and history.

Summer 2014

Science, Religion and Politics

Seung-Hun Lee

More often than not, Science is intertwined with Religion and Politics. This course will provide students with an opportunity to study the entanglement of Science, Religion, and Politics, and how they have driven national and international policies. Examples will include the Galileo affair and the Manhattan project. Truth, reality, ethics and the anthropology of those involved will be examined in several exemplary cases. Offered Spring 2012, Spring 2013, and Spring 2014 as a Pavilion Seminar.

Spring 2014

Humanities in Place: Academic Space in Theory

Bill Sherman and Michael Levenson

This seminar involves the design, fabrication and erection of a portable fabric structure to provide a venue for readings, conversations and performances sponsored by the Institute of the Humanities and Global Culture. Alongside the work of planning and construction, the seminar will address questions of sustainable ethics, the theory of shelter, and the symbolic spaces of humanistic learning. The completed structure will stand as both a metaphor for academic aspiration and the central space of events in the humanities. Students will work with a group of faculty members to research historical precedents, contemporary lightweight materials, develop design proposals, fabricate the structure and deploy it in multiple sites on the university grounds during Humanities Week, the second week of April.

American Youth and Film

Brandon Walsh and Eliza Fox

This seminar focuses on post-WWII American film made about or for teenagers and adolescents. The changing conceptions of aging, maturity, and American identity on screen form the crux of our discussion, and the course explores these topics in relation to race and rituals of belonging, sexuality and body horror, and the commodification of youth and American identity.

Fall 2014

Viewing the Global South

Audrey Golden

What can film and television teach us about violence and resistance in other parts of the world? Do these popular mediums have something to say about how we understand recent moments in history? In the 1980s, the region commonly known as the “Global South” experienced an unprecedented level of localized violence. Each week we’ll focus on a place and a work of cinema, watching the films while reading excerpts from literature and history.

Fall 2014

Viewing the Global South

Audrey Golden

What can film and television teach us about violence and resistance in other parts of the world? Do these popular mediums have something to say about how we understand recent moments in history? In the 1980s, the region commonly known as the “Global South” experienced an unprecedented level of localized violence. Each week we’ll focus on a place and a work of cinema, watching the films while reading excerpts from literature and history.